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Schlep

Vitabase

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wiseguy
I am interested to hear from anyone taking the Vitabase blood sugar formula and the results that they have had.

 

Thanks

These concoctions contain a variety of substances that are known to help reduce blood glucose levels. The problem is that they are not in near the quantity needed to produce results at the recommended dosage. So in my opinion they are totally useless.

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Schlep
You can always check out ______________for reviews on different products.

 

I did check that out was not sure if the reviews were unbiased or not.

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Old man

I just replied to this question in the above "Which supplements do you take" so this is sort of a double post.

Tried a few bottles of Vitabase blood sugar formula and it seemed to do no harm. I found Nature's Way Completia Diabetic Tabs which I think is a good multi-vitamin and mineral supplement and it has everything listed in the Vitabase product at $14.95 per 90 tabs at Highlife-vitamins. I take one tablet three times per day. I did not notice a lowering of my usual 100 to 110 fasting levels. As a matter of fact after about a year I now have fasting of around 120. I actually think the Vitabase ingredients have neither helped nor hurt. Maybe someone with higher numbers would benefit. If I can't lower mine soon I may take a trip to the vet to get some met.

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Alice

Since supplements aren't regulated, they can make all the claims they want and not have to provide research and testing to prove results. This is a huge loophole in the supplement business...and the reason why so many people are making huge amounts of money selling this stuff.

 

I don't think these things can "hurt"...but I'd take them with a grain of salt and knowing you are handing money over to a company that doesn't have to provide results.

 

I have a friend who is an attorney for such a company.

 

Someone is making a lot of money selling cinnamon right now (a few people)...who would have thought? (No, I don't want to hear about the miracles cinnamon provides...research and the ADA say nothing has been proven)

 

When it has been proven, then I'm open to spending money.

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Schlep
Since supplements aren't regulated, they can make all the claims they want and not have to provide research and testing to prove results. This is a huge loophole in the supplement business...and the reason why so many people are making huge amounts of money selling this stuff.

 

I don't think these things can "hurt"...but I'd take them with a grain of salt and knowing you are handing money over to a company that doesn't have to provide results.

 

I have a friend who is an attorney for such a company.

 

Someone is making a lot of money selling cinnamon right now (a few people)...who would have thought? (No, I don't want to hear about the miracles cinnamon provides...research and the ADA say nothing has been proven)

 

When it has been proven, then I'm open to spending money.

 

I do not dispute any of this and that is why I asked for comments from those who have tried the supplement.

 

If we all close our eyes to everything that is said no one would be using insulin now as for every statement made someone can find a claim for it and one against it.

 

What about those that say there is a cure for diabetes out there but there is to much money to be made by not disclosing the cure.

 

What about the FDA approving nutra sweet if you read up on it you will find that it originally started as an ant poison and the FDA denied its use. Now it is okay?

 

So please in my post I asked for opinions from those that had used it to see what the results are. Don't be so sure that the FDA and other government departments are looking out for your best interest all the time.

 

Why has the FDA not approved stevia?

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AliB

Hi. I am one of those people you have been wanting to hear a reply from.

 

I have been taking the Vitabase Blood Sugar Formula for over a month now. It has brought my sugar levels down from consistently over 300 to within, or just above 'normal' range.

 

I am absolutely delighted with the result. Not only is it cheap, it works.

 

You have to be sensible with your food control and limit the carbs - particularly if you are trying to lose weight, which is how Diabetics should eat anyway. If it is used as an excuse to pig out or carry on eating too much food and too much rubbish, it will not work.

 

My doc took me off insulin and put me on to Byetta, but took me off after 3 months as although it had helped me lose some weight (by making me feel so ill and giving me raging diarrhea), it had not touched my blood sugar levels and he felt the awful side effects weren't worth the sacrifice.

 

The day after going back on the insulin I started the Vitabase, getting virtually instant results which are improving all the time, and haven't looked back since. I get such a kick out of seeing most readings now consistently within in normal range!

 

Hey all you cynics out there - don't knock it till you've tried it! Give me a natural remedy over toxic drugs and their horrendous side effects any day!

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wiseguy
Someone is making a lot of money selling cinnamon right now (a few people)...who would have thought? (No, I don't want to hear about the miracles cinnamon provides...research and the ADA say nothing has been proven)

What does the ADA have to do with it? These are the morons that tell you that an A1c under 7% is just fine. And how about the position of Richard Kahn, Chief Scientific Officer of the ADA, that there's no value in using an insulin pump, or a CGM system, or even a fingerstick meter if you're a Type 2 not on insulin.

 

In other threads, I have shown plenty of proof that cinnamon does help lower blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetics. I will not go into all of that again here.

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wiseguy
Don't be so sure that the FDA and other government departments are looking out for your best interest all the time.

 

Why has the FDA not approved stevia?

Stevia has been approved by the FDA as a supplement but not as a sweetener. So it won't hurt you if you ingest it as a supplement, but don't dare use it to sweeten your coffee. Just another example of the FDA's ties to big business. Stevia is a natural substance that cannot be patented and therefore is detrimental to the profits of the sugar substitute industry.

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Alice

ADA aside, there needs to be some protection of people who throw money into hope. It's my personal option to wait and review research and testing before giving someone my money. I find fault with ADA for many things (lack of public education for one...related to my issue with supplements)... but they are at least a body working, with all their faults, toward filtering some of this mis-information that permeates our community.

 

Those that say they benefit from a supplement are also using other methods that can reduce glucose...such as meds, exercise & diet.

 

To say that a supplement has magically reduced someones glucose level is very misleading and dangerous.

 

But, in the US, people can hand their money to whatever hope they wish for...

 

Diet supplements, muscle-building supplements...I think it's a cagey business. My opinion...but I have a hard time watching these forums fill up (not just DF) with ads for supplements via postings. Not suggesting that's what the original poster is doing, but without expressing my opinion on the lack of regulation, a lot of people only get the "sell"...not the caution.

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Schlep
ADA aside, there needs to be some protection of people who throw money into hope. It's my personal option to wait and review research and testing before giving someone my money. I find fault with ADA for many things (lack of public education for one...related to my issue with supplements)... but they are at least a body working, with all their faults, toward filtering some of this mis-information that permeates our community.

 

Those that say they benefit from a supplement are also using other methods that can reduce glucose...such as meds, exercise & diet.

 

To say that a supplement has magically reduced someones glucose level is very misleading and dangerous.

 

But, in the US, people can hand their money to whatever hope they wish for...

 

Diet supplements, muscle-building supplements...I think it's a cagey business. My opinion...but I have a hard time watching these forums fill up (not just DF) with ads for supplements via postings. Not suggesting that's what the original poster is doing, but without expressing my opinion on the lack of regulation, a lot of people only get the "sell"...not the caution.

 

I don't think anyone can be quick to judge unless they have tried something and it did not work. To spend $10.00 on a supplement to see if it works and the claims are true or false is something after getting as much information as I can I think myself and others have the right to do.

 

My goodness what happens if something actually works will you continue to deny it or wait for the FDA to okay it in 10 years?

 

They okayed saccharin and what happened there? And what about thalidomide?

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notme
ADA aside, there needs to be some protection of people who throw money into hope. It's my personal option to wait and review research and testing before giving someone my money. I find fault with ADA for many things (lack of public education for one...related to my issue with supplements)... but they are at least a body working, with all their faults, toward filtering some of this mis-information that permeates our community.

 

Those that say they benefit from a supplement are also using other methods that can reduce glucose...such as meds, exercise & diet.

 

To say that a supplement has magically reduced someones glucose level is very misleading and dangerous.

 

But, in the US, people can hand their money to whatever hope they wish for...

 

Diet supplements, muscle-building supplements...I think it's a cagey business. My opinion...but I have a hard time watching these forums fill up (not just DF) with ads for supplements via postings. Not suggesting that's what the original poster is doing, but without expressing my opinion on the lack of regulation, a lot of people only get the "sell"...not the caution.

 

I don't think anyone can be quick to judge unless they have tried something and it did not work. To spend $10.00 on a supplement to see if it works and the claims are true or false is something after getting as much information as I can I think myself and others have the right to do.

 

My goodness what happens if something actually works will you continue to deny it or wait for the FDA to okay it in 10 years?

 

They okayed saccharin and what happened there? And what about thalidomide?

 

I can see valid points in both posts. My big concern is that people get "sold" on some item (and there are SO many claims to cure) and they damage their health taking a so called natural suppliment. Many of these natural suppliments are harmful if taken in excess.

 

The American public, in general, is gullable. There does need to be someone or body of people that protect the public from the scammers that tell us we will be cured if we ingest some foreign substance.

 

If a miracle cure or suppliment is found, you can be assured that word will get out. Claiming that a suppliment will lower your blood sugar enough to give up taking insulin is pretty wreckless. I would hope that people would be careful when experimenting with this drastic decision.

 

Honestly, I would be much more inclined to believe this type of claim from a long time poster on our site who tried something new and found it to be amazing. I am always leary of people that post without an introduction and claim a miracle drug is out there. No offense intended to anyone. Just my opinion.

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Harold
I don't think anyone can be quick to judge unless they have tried something and it did not work. To spend $10.00 on a supplement to see if it works and the claims are true or false is something after getting as much information as I can I think myself and others have the right to do.

 

My goodness what happens if something actually works will you continue to deny it or wait for the FDA to okay it in 10 years?

 

They okayed saccharin and what happened there? And what about thalidomide?

Supplements are by the the name a supplement to meds, diet, and exercise. They are not a substitute for meds, diet, and exercise. People desperately in denial will latch on to supplements as cures. When you have watched someone waste away taking supplements instead of their meds and skipping meals because they did not have enough money left for food you will understand the hostility some have for supplements.

 

When people come in claiming they have been taking a supplement and stopped taking their meds because they have great numbers good for them. However not knowing if they have been a type 2 or type 1.5 or any other of the many factors that go into the making of diabetes, can we take it with anything other than a grain of salt? I want to know all of the particulars and want to hear how they are doing in 5, 10, and 15 years before I waste my time and health. IMHO anything else smells of desperately seeking a cure. Just my opinion.

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Schlep
Supplements are by the the name a supplement to meds, diet, and exercise. They are not a substitute for meds, diet, and exercise. People desperately in denial will latch on to supplements as cures. When you have watched someone waste away taking supplements instead of their meds and skipping meals because they did not have enough money left for food you will understand the hostility some have for supplements.

 

When people come in claiming they have been taking a supplement and stopped taking their meds because they have great numbers good for them. However not knowing if they have been a type 2 or type 1.5 or any other of the many factors that go into the making of diabetes, can we take it with anything other than a grain of salt? I want to know all of the particulars and want to hear how they are doing in 5, 10, and 15 years before I waste my time and health. IMHO anything else smells of desperately seeking a cure. Just my opinion.

 

Supplements are natural and where do you think 90 % of the drugs we take today originated? With natural supplements.

 

No one has been advised to quit their medication, no one has been advised to quit eating because they are taking supplements.

 

If people are doing that then they are sick and need strong medication.

 

I admit it is hard to believe only one post, but that is why I asked for more information and I don't feel it is the right for others to come on and condemn my request for information with their biased opinions about a product they know nothing about.

 

If you had a mechanic that tried to fix your car but had never been under the hood of a car would you trust him?

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notme

I don't think anyone intends to say that suppliments aren't worth investigating. However, care needs to be taken when adding suppliments while you are taking medications or forgoing medication entirely and only taking a suppliment. Women who are pregnant or nursing should be especially cautious about using herbal supplements or any type of dietary supplement that contains herbs, either alone or in mixtures since these products can act like drugs. This caution also applies to treating children with herbal supplements. Just because something is marked as "natural" doesn't make it safe.

 

Nobody is condemning anyone for posting their personal experience using a suppliment. What is questionable is a first time post that reads like an advertisement. I think your question was definitely worth asking and I want to hear responses. We do have a policy on diabetes forums about advertising and it needs to be remembered by all of us who post. Almost daily we get people who sign on to DF and try to sell their products. Most are deleted before anyone has to be bothered with them. A few slip through.

 

There have been snake oil salesmen since time began. If we lifted the rule about advertising, you would not be able to read your daily posts without having to sift through a million sales presentations and some of them would be dangerous.

 

Please try and lighten up a bit Schlep. There has to be a voice of reason on DF that weeds through all of the advertisting posts. I am not saying our new poster is an advertiser however we get some sneaky advertisers here. Nobody would like to see anyone hurt by a product that wasn't well tested and known safe. Certainly Tony would not want anyone injured.

 

Name of natural supplement and

(Also known as),

Dangers and

Regulatory actions

 

DEFINITELY HAZARDOUS

Documented organ failure and known carcinogenic properties

Aristolochic acid(Aristolochia, birthwort, snakeroot, snakeweed, sangree root, sangrel, serpentary, serpentaria; asarum canadense, wild ginger). Can be an ingredient in Chinese herbal products labeled fang ji, mu tong, ma dou ling, and mu xiang. Can be an unlabeled substitute for other herbs, including akebia, asarum, clematis, cocculus, stephania, and vladimiria species.

 

 

Potenthuman carcinogen; kidney failure, sometimes requiring transplant; deaths reported.

FDAwarning to consumers and industry and import alert, in April 2001. Banned in 7 European countries and Egypt, Japan, and Venezuela.

 

 

 

VERY LIKELY HAZARDOUS

Banned in other countries, FDA warning, or adverse effects in studies

 

Comfrey (Symphytumofficinale, *** ear, black root, blackwort, bruisewort, consolidae radix, consound, gum plant, healing herb, knitback, knitbone, salsify, slippery root, symphytum radix, wallwort)

 

 

Abnormalliver function or damage, often irreversible; deaths reported.

FDAadvised industry to remove from market in July 2001.

 

Androstenedione

(4-androstene-3, 17-dione, andro, androstene)

Increased cancer risk, decrease in HDL cholesterol.

FDAwarned 23 companies to stop manufacturing, marketing, and distributing in March 2004. Banned by athletic associations.

 

 

 

Chaparral(Larrea divaricata, creosote bush, greasewood, hediondilla, jarilla, larreastat)

Abnormalliver function or damage, often irreversible; deaths reported.

FDAwarning to consumers in December 1992.

 

Germander(Teucrium chamaedrys, wall germander, wild germander)

Abnormalliver function or damage, often irreversible; deaths reported.

 

 

Bannedin France and Germany.

 

Kava (Pipermethysticum, ava, awa, gea, gi, intoxicating pepper, kao, kavain, kawa-pfeffer, kew, long pepper, malohu, maluk, meruk, milik, rauschpfeffer, sakau, tonga, wurzelstock, yagona, yangona)

 

 

Abnormalliver function or damage, occasionally irreversible; deaths reported.

FDAwarning to consumers in March 2002. Banned in Canada, Germany, Singapore, South Africa, and Switzerland.

 

LIKELY HAZARDOUS Adverse-event reports or theoretical risks

Bitter orange(Citrus aurantium, green orange, kijitsu, neroli oil, Seville orange, shangzhou zhiqiao, sour orange, zhi oiao, zhi xhi)

 

 

Highblood pressure; increased risk of heart arrythmias, heart attack, stroke.

 

 

None

 

Organ/glandular extracts(brain/adrenal/pituitary/

placenta/other gland “substance” or “concentrate”)

Theoretical risk of mad cow disease, particularly from brain extracts.

FDAbanned high-risk bovine materials from older cows in foods and supplements in January 2004. (High-risk parts from cows under 30 months still permitted.) Banned in France and Switzerland.

 

 

 

Lobelia(Lobelia inflata, asthma weed, bladderpod, emetic herb, gagroot, lobelie, indian tobacco, pukeweed, vomit wort, wild tobacco)

Breathing difficulty, rapid heartbeat, low blood pressure, diarrhea, dizziness, tremors; possible deaths reported.

 

 

Bannedin Bangladesh and Italy.

 

Pennyroyaloil(Hedeoma pulegioides, lurk-in-the-ditch, mosquito plant, piliolerial, pudding grass, pulegium, run-by-the-ground, squaw balm, squawmint, stinking balm, tickweed)

Liverand kidney failure, nerve damage, convulsions, abdominal tenderness, burning of the throat; deaths reported.

 

 

None

 

Scullcap(Scutellaria lateriflora, blue pimpernel, helmet flower, hoodwort, mad weed, mad-dog herb, mad-dog weed, quaker bonnet, scutelluria, skullcap)

 

 

Abnormalliver function or damage.

None

 

Yohimbe (Pausinystalia yohimbe, johimbi, yohimbehe, yohimbine)

Changein blood pressure, heart arrythmias, respiratory depression, heart attack; deaths reported.

 

 

None

 

According to product labels.

Sources: Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database 2004 and Consumers Union's medical and research consultants.

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REDLAN

nice list of stuff not to take....

 

I googled the ingredients for the vitabase blood formula.

 

it contains amongst other things...

 

1) bitter melon. There is some (limited) evidence that it may lower blood sugar. However all the studies I found listed are from either rat or mice studies. There are some abstracts about it's use in humans but no clinical data to back it up.

 

2) gymnema sylvestra - this is my favourite. This stuff is used in Ayurveda (traditional Indian medicine). It is claimed to block sugar - what it actually does is to change the taste of sugar for a short period, and so discourage the taker from eating sugar.

 

3) Guggul - I found 1 whole clinical trial for this one - Guggul is supposed to lower cholesterol (it does not have any claimed effect on blood sugars). In the clinical trial guggul actually managed to raise LDL cholesterol by a modest amount, and 6 of the subjects suffered a hypersensitivity rash from taking guggul (about 10% of the participants).

 

so...

 

you can take a supplement that lowers blood sugars in rodents, makes sugar taste a bit funny for a while, which may raise your cholesterol by a small amount, and possibly give you a rash.

 

it will however most definitely relieve you of your cash.

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Schlep
I don't think anyone intends to say that suppliments aren't worth investigating. However, care needs to be taken when adding suppliments while you are taking medications or forgoing medication entirely and only taking a suppliment. Women who are pregnant or nursing should be especially cautious about using herbal supplements or any type of dietary supplement that contains herbs, either alone or in mixtures since these products can act like drugs. This caution also applies to treating children with herbal supplements. Just because something is marked as "natural" doesn't make it safe.

 

Nobody is condemning anyone for posting their personal experience using a suppliment. What is questionable is a first time post that reads like an advertisement. I think your question was definitely worth asking and I want to hear responses. We do have a policy on diabetes forums about advertising and it needs to be remembered by all of us who post. Almost daily we get people who sign on to DF and try to sell their products. Most are deleted before anyone has to be bothered with them. A few slip through.

 

There have been snake oil salesmen since time began. If we lifted the rule about advertising, you would not be able to read your daily posts without having to sift through a million sales presentations and some of them would be dangerous.

 

Please try and lighten up a bit Schlep. There has to be a voice of reason on DF that weeds through all of the advertisting posts. I am not saying our new poster is an advertiser however we get some sneaky advertisers here. Nobody would like to see anyone hurt by a product that wasn't well tested and known safe. Certainly Tony would not want anyone injured.

 

Name of natural supplement and

(Also known as),

Dangers and

Regulatory actions

 

DEFINITELY HAZARDOUS

Documented organ failure and known carcinogenic properties

Aristolochic acid(Aristolochia, birthwort, snakeroot, snakeweed, sangree root, sangrel, serpentary, serpentaria; asarum canadense, wild ginger). Can be an ingredient in Chinese herbal products labeled fang ji, mu tong, ma dou ling, and mu xiang. Can be an unlabeled substitute for other herbs, including akebia, asarum, clematis, cocculus, stephania, and vladimiria species.

 

 

Potenthuman carcinogen; kidney failure, sometimes requiring transplant; deaths reported.

FDAwarning to consumers and industry and import alert, in April 2001. Banned in 7 European countries and Egypt, Japan, and Venezuela.

 

 

 

VERY LIKELY HAZARDOUS

Banned in other countries, FDA warning, or adverse effects in studies

 

Comfrey (Symphytumofficinale, *** ear, black root, blackwort, bruisewort, consolidae radix, consound, gum plant, healing herb, knitback, knitbone, salsify, slippery root, symphytum radix, wallwort)

 

 

Abnormalliver function or damage, often irreversible; deaths reported.

FDAadvised industry to remove from market in July 2001.

 

Androstenedione

(4-androstene-3, 17-dione, andro, androstene)

Increased cancer risk, decrease in HDL cholesterol.

FDAwarned 23 companies to stop manufacturing, marketing, and distributing in March 2004. Banned by athletic associations.

 

 

 

Chaparral(Larrea divaricata, creosote bush, greasewood, hediondilla, jarilla, larreastat)

Abnormalliver function or damage, often irreversible; deaths reported.

FDAwarning to consumers in December 1992.

 

Germander(Teucrium chamaedrys, wall germander, wild germander)

Abnormalliver function or damage, often irreversible; deaths reported.

 

 

Bannedin France and Germany.

 

Kava (Pipermethysticum, ava, awa, gea, gi, intoxicating pepper, kao, kavain, kawa-pfeffer, kew, long pepper, malohu, maluk, meruk, milik, rauschpfeffer, sakau, tonga, wurzelstock, yagona, yangona)

 

 

Abnormalliver function or damage, occasionally irreversible; deaths reported.

FDAwarning to consumers in March 2002. Banned in Canada, Germany, Singapore, South Africa, and Switzerland.

 

LIKELY HAZARDOUS Adverse-event reports or theoretical risks

Bitter orange(Citrus aurantium, green orange, kijitsu, neroli oil, Seville orange, shangzhou zhiqiao, sour orange, zhi oiao, zhi xhi)

 

 

Highblood pressure; increased risk of heart arrythmias, heart attack, stroke.

 

 

None

 

Organ/glandular extracts(brain/adrenal/pituitary/

placenta/other gland “substance” or “concentrate”)

Theoretical risk of mad cow disease, particularly from brain extracts.

FDAbanned high-risk bovine materials from older cows in foods and supplements in January 2004. (High-risk parts from cows under 30 months still permitted.) Banned in France and Switzerland.

 

 

 

Lobelia(Lobelia inflata, asthma weed, bladderpod, emetic herb, gagroot, lobelie, indian tobacco, pukeweed, vomit wort, wild tobacco)

Breathing difficulty, rapid heartbeat, low blood pressure, diarrhea, dizziness, tremors; possible deaths reported.

 

 

Bannedin Bangladesh and Italy.

 

Pennyroyaloil(Hedeoma pulegioides, lurk-in-the-ditch, mosquito plant, piliolerial, pudding grass, pulegium, run-by-the-ground, squaw balm, squawmint, stinking balm, tickweed)

Liverand kidney failure, nerve damage, convulsions, abdominal tenderness, burning of the throat; deaths reported.

 

 

None

 

Scullcap(Scutellaria lateriflora, blue pimpernel, helmet flower, hoodwort, mad weed, mad-dog herb, mad-dog weed, quaker bonnet, scutelluria, skullcap)

 

 

Abnormalliver function or damage.

None

 

Yohimbe (Pausinystalia yohimbe, johimbi, yohimbehe, yohimbine)

Changein blood pressure, heart arrythmias, respiratory depression, heart attack; deaths reported.

 

 

None

 

According to product labels.

Sources: Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database 2004 and Consumers Union's medical and research consultants.

 

Wow how you have taken my posts and original thread out of context and added so much to a simple request for people to tell of their experience with a certain product.

 

I watch on this site many times and see people giving medical advise to others without knowing who they are or about the other drugs they are on.

 

But yet a simple request About peoples own experience draws the anger of mods and others just for asking for peoples opinions.

 

Yes I agree (as I said before) that the person who gave raving reviews on Vitabase only had one post, does that mean they are not telling the truth. According to you yes it does and again I do not know the answer but I certaninly can go through 100's of posts on this board where people are left to make their own decisions.

 

Again who said to stop taking your medication not me all I asked for was personal experiences. You do not seem to want to let people post that.

 

If you think that the person who wrote About their personal experience on Vitabase was someone doing an advertisement then please delete the post.

 

Why are people who reccomend medications to others without medical knowledge allowed to post what they want with no control.

 

Again if you feel someone advertised in my thread then delete the post.

 

Perhaps the poster should be contacted rather than triing to prove them wrong without knowing anyone who has taken the product.

 

Please take the time to research the positive as well as the negative before posting. Again all I wanted to know was if anyone had used the product as it seemed like a simple question.

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Schlep
nice list of stuff not to take....

 

I googled the ingredients for the vitabase blood formula.

 

it contains amongst other things...

 

1) bitter melon. There is some (limited) evidence that it may lower blood sugar. However all the studies I found listed are from either rat or mice studies. There are some abstracts about it's use in humans but no clinical data to back it up.

 

2) gymnema sylvestra - this is my favourite. This stuff is used in Ayurveda (traditional Indian medicine). It is claimed to block sugar - what it actually does is to change the taste of sugar for a short period, and so discourage the taker from eating sugar.

 

3) Guggul - I found 1 whole clinical trial for this one - Guggul is supposed to lower cholesterol (it does not have any claimed effect on blood sugars). In the clinical trial guggul actually managed to raise LDL cholesterol by a modest amount, and 6 of the subjects suffered a hypersensitivity rash from taking guggul (about 10% of the participants).

 

so...

 

you can take a supplement that lowers blood sugars in rodents, makes sugar taste a bit funny for a while, which may raise your cholesterol by a small amount, and possibly give you a rash.

 

it will however most definitely relieve you of your cash.

 

Would you like to see the reports on nutri sweet? Why do people get upset because others do not have the same opinion as themselves?

 

You can find anything you want on the net to prove for or against a product that is why I asked for personal experiences.

 

I ended up with poisoning from nutra sweet but that is okay the FDA approved it.

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notme

Schlep, nobody is angered by your post. Nobody was upset at you for asking. The original post was perfectly fine.

 

Supplements can be dangerous, but they can also be helpful to some. What worries people are claims of miraculous cures and the ability to abandon insulin from a poster that has never been here or even told us what type diabetes they have. It screams of advertisement.

 

There are no mods or anyone else as far as I know that are angry. There are a few that are concerned about the claims made about this amazing supplement that all but cures diabetes. If you look at the thread you just posted, it is a question about what supplement people take. Nobody made any miraculous claims and most people just answered the question about what they were taking and why.

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wiseguy

Schlep, you're fighting a losing battle. The majority of people actually believe that the FDA is protecting them and that any substance that has not been FDA approved must be snake oil. The fact that FDA approved substances have ended up killing many thousands of people doesn't seem to matter. Anyone who doesn't see that the FDA is heavily influenced buy big business has their head in the sand.

 

What you hear over and over again is that this and that supplement has not been proven to work. They never will be if we leave it up to the medical establishment. They are the ones who fund all the research and they are not going to spend any money researching something that they can't patent. Where's the profit in that?

 

If you search enough you will find evidence that some supplements actually do help with BG levels. The only "proof" will be your own, and others, experiences. But don't expect many people to believe you.

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Schlep
Schlep, you're fighting a losing battle. The majority of people actually believe that the FDA is protecting them and that any substance that has not been FDA approved must be snake oil. The fact that FDA approved substances have ended up killing many thousands of people doesn't seem to matter. Anyone who doesn't see that the FDA is heavily influenced buy big business has their head in the sand.

 

What you hear over and over again is that this and that supplement has not been proven to work. They never will be if we leave it up to the medical establishment. They are the ones who fund all the research and they are not going to spend any money researching something that they can't patent. Where's the profit in that?

 

If you search enough you will find evidence that some supplements actually do help with BG levels. The only "proof" will be your own, and others, experiences. But don't expect many people to believe you.

 

Thank you well said.

 

Approved drugs that kill, worth reading.

 

PRESCRIPTION DRUGS THAT KILL: ANOTHER KIND OF DRUG PROBLEM

 

Have you ever listened to the drug commercials on TV and the side effects and yet some do not even tell you what they are for.

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