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DeusXM

Acronyms

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DeusXM

Deus's Diabetes Dictionary v0.1

 

IDDM - Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (or T1 to you and me)

 

NIDDM - Non-insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (T2)

 

MODY - Mature-Onset Diabetes of the Young. T2 in under-30s, usually the term is only applied to those who appear to have developed the condition purely through genetics.

 

LADA - the opposite of MODY - Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults (basically a form of T1 that occurs in adults that takes a while to develop, AKA T1.5) Also a poor-quality brand of car from the former USSR. Neither form of LADA is particularly fun to have and both require similar amounts of maintainance.

 

Dxed - diagnosed

 

MDI - Multiple Daily Injections (the insulin treatment plan that involves basal insulin injections and then bolus injections when you eat)

 

Basal - background insulin. This sort of insulin is usually long-lasting, slow-acting and shouldn't actually reduce your BG levels, it should just keep them constant.

 

Bolus - the extra insulin you take when you eat. Usually short-lasting, fast acting, and reduces any BG spikes.

 

BG, BM, BS - Blood Glucose, Blood Monitoring, Blood Sugar. All mean the same thing ie. it's the reading on your meter.

 

HbA1c - aka A1c. A blood test that evaluates your average BG for the last 3 months based on the haemoglobin of your blood cells. The more scientific-minded amongst us refer to it as 'how sticky your blood is' :biggrin:

 

DKA - Diabetic Ketoacidosis. What happens when you haven't got enough insulin. It's another form of metabolism that primarily burns fat and muscle and makes your blood all acidic. Will be fatal if not treated.

 

Ketones - waste products of DKA that show up in your urine. Generally not a good thing to have, although if you wake up in the morning and find really minor traces of ketones, it's probably not a problem, provided they go away.

 

Hypo - short for hypoglycaemia. Low blood sugar. Like being drunk but without the good bits. Needs some sugar in order to correct.

 

There's loads more, but now I'm bored with my dictionary.:boring:

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UpNorth

LADA - the opposite of MODY - Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults (basically a form of T1 that occurs in adults that takes a while to develop, AKA T1.5) Also a poor-quality brand of car from the former USSR. Neither form of LADA is particularly fun to have and both require similar amounts of maintainance.

 

This one is just too funny! :D "Also a poor-quality brand of car from the former USSR. Neither form of LADA is particularly fun to have and both require similar amounts of maintainance."

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poodlebone

CGMS - continuous glucose monitoring system. A sensor is placed under the skin, attached to a transmitter and the results are sent to a monitor or insulin pump carried on the person.

 

I:C Ratio - Insulin:Carbohydrate ratio - the number of grams of carbohydrate covered by one unit of insulin

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shiftzor

Hyper - short for hyperglycemia. High blood sugar level. Usually accompanied by feeling warm, sweating, frequent urination, dry mouth and fatigue.

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notreally

This one should almost be stickied in the introduction. Great information and helps me to read some of these posts.

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Russell A.

MM-minimed pump

Pod- Omni pod

Coz-cozmo pump

Ping Animas Ping system

 

Okay now I am stretching it!

 

Will think of some others to help things along.

 

Russell

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Ckoei

GAD65 antibodies:

 

GAD = Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase, an enzyme that grabs a carboxylic purse off glutamic acid (an amino acid and "giddy-up" neurotransmitter), to leave behind Gamma-Amino-Butanoic Acid (GABA, a "hold-your-horses" neurotransmitter). Both transmitters act as traffic cops inside several kinds of endocrine cell (β-cells included), where they handle the stopping and starting of hormone secretion. Antibodies against GAD (like birds of prey) imply that some endocrine cells have spilled their guts after attack by predatory autoreactive T-cells.

(Some labs slap on an "anti" before the GAD, which to me would indicate that the birds of prey are preying on themselves?)

 

65 = size of the molecule, in kiloDalton.

 

Fortunately, I'm about to be gobbled up by a phagocyte, so I cannot con

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LCD
Fortunately, I'm about to be gobbled up by a phagocyte, so I cannot con

 

Ckoei ~ are you still there?

 

Is this another thing to worry about, those of us with the D. Type 1 or 2?

 

Libby :D

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Moonpie
This one should almost be stickied in the introduction. Great information and helps me to read some of these posts.

I agree I just found it through a link in a new thread.

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davef

Another one which can be particularly relevant is:

 

YMMV: Your Mileage May Vary.

 

I say it's particularly relevant in relation to Diabetes management, as just becuase something works for somebody else and does not work for you, does not mean you are weird or do something wrong, we are all different with our own variety of diabetes so not everything will work the same for everyone.

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DeusXM
sometimes extended to IMHO (humble opinion)

 

....which is only ever used by people who aren't in the least bit humble about their opinions :D

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janice21475

Being new and still a lurker, I am trying to learn as much as I can by reading *everything* I can find, this DP has been popping up and confuses me. Help, please.

 

Thank you,

Janice

Wife and food preparer of a Type 2 - I feel the weight of the responsibility strongly on my shoulders. Want him around and above ground and feeling better.

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foxl
Being new and still a lurker, I am trying to learn as much as I can by reading *everything* I can find, this DP has been popping up and confuses me. Help, please.

 

Thank you,

Janice

Wife and food preparer of a Type 2 - I feel the weight of the responsibility strongly on my shoulders. Want him around and above ground and feeling better.

 

 

Dawn Phenomenon. Increased blood glucose in the morning. People have various recommendations for dealing with it. Try searching the forums on those words.

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MikeJsimon

Gestational

Gestational DI occurs during pregnancy. As a systemic body process pregnant women produce vasopressinase in the placenta, which breaks down antidiuretic hormone secretion. Mostly gestational DI can be treated with desmopressin. In rare cases, however, an abnormality in the thirst mechanism causes gestational DI then desmopressin should not be used.

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Delphinus

PWD - Person with diabetes. (I never knew what PWD was until yesterday. Saw it used in a thread and kept going over it in my head until it came to me. :D )

 

JGTTFFAMS - Jason going to the fridge for a midnight snack.

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plattb1
PWD - Person with diabetes. (I never knew what PWD was until yesterday. Saw it used in a thread and kept going over it in my head until it came to me. :D )

 

JGTTFFAMS - Jason going to the fridge for a midnight snack.

 

Jase, you see why we missed you? Your humor is irreplaceable ... love it.

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princesslinda

DX: Diagnosis

 

OP: Original poster/post

 

PP: Post-prandial (after eating/meal)

 

PCP: Primary care provider/physician

 

Rx: Prescription

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micks

micks.

I am a type 2 new to this forum.

Can someone explain to me the difference with the readings. I see where some people get a reading of 150 or thereabouts, but my Endo. only tolds me about the readings, as seen on a monitor. ie. 6.8 or 7.6. This has been making it hard for me (a newbee) to understand what some people are talking about.

 

Micks

 

currentlly 45 units Novo-rapid

& 40 units Lantus A.M.

45 units Novo-rapid

& 60 units Lantus P.M.

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