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Yoboney

Use Caution When Considering Lasik Surgery

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Yoboney

Hello folks, well I finally found out what is wrong with my left eye. As I told you I had lasik surgery in 1999 and my eyes were bad prior to that. They went from 20/600 to 20/30 and 20/25. I had until 1995 with excellent vision. Then I noticed that my left eye was fluctuating and I had no idea why. I thought it was needing a rezapping by the dr. I asked about it each year as the left eye got blurrier and blurrier. Then last year I had some diabetic sores and I thought diabetes was the culprit. But the tests came back negative so far. Today, after going to six specialists I asked this doctor if we were going to do a topography of the eye. He did and then came back and said it was indeed ectasia. It is very scary as this can cause horrible blindness and I have no insurance..he did tell me to get medical insurance. So now I will continues tests for diabetes, glaucoma, more gout and boy doesn't it hit after you hit 45. :confused: Then I was reading one doctor mentioning that glaucoma can cause the ectasia so anyone that has lasik should really think hard before having this surgery. It normally affects both eyes so I will be doing lots of praying that it does not hit both.

 

Brad

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Tiger Lily

Brad, you made me look up what was happening

 

LaserMyEye :: FAQ for Patients :: Ectasia

 

are you using the gas permiable contact lenses to help the eye retain it's shape?

 

the eye clinic that does the lasik surgery (well, one of them) told me flat out NO, they will not do lasik on a diabetic........ but that was also years ago

 

i do hope you don't progress to further problem

 

read that link....... they mention surgery to repair the surgically induced damage to the eye (ironic, eh)

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Yoboney
Brad, you made me look up what was happening

 

LaserMyEye :: FAQ for Patients :: Ectasia

 

are you using the gas permiable contact lenses to help the eye retain it's shape?

 

the eye clinic that does the lasik surgery (well, one of them) told me flat out NO, they will not do lasik on a diabetic........ but that was also years ago

 

i do hope you don't progress to further problem

 

read that link....... they mention surgery to repair the surgically induced damage to the eye (ironic, eh)

 

I am actually going on June 20 for an exam and fitting for the synergeys lenses. They are supposed to help with the progression. I used to wear gas permeable lenses years ago..kind of funny to go full circle back to them. So I guess we will find out in the future...hope to be able to see then too..:(

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LasikExpert

Brad,

 

Ectasia (keratectasia) is a forward bulging of the cornea due to weakness induced by trauma or surgery such as Lasik. Glaucoma is an increased pressure inside the eye. This pressure can cause the cornea to vault forward. Glaucoma can present the same symptom as ectasia.

 

The fluctuation in vision throughout the day indicates that your problem may be more related to an elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) than ectasia. It appears that you have had a stable cornea for nearly a decade after your Lasik. Although it is possible that you have developed late-onset ectasia, it is not highly probable.

 

Even a cornea that is untouched by Lasik or similar vision correction surgery can bulge forward with elevated IOP.

 

About six decades of practical experience indictaes that a healthy cornea will remain stable if at least 250 microns of corneal tissue remains untouched. There are now diagnostic medical devices that can measure accurately the amount of untouched tissue in your corneas. This would help in an evaluation if you are dealing with ectasia.

 

Another condition that will undoubtedly be evaluated by your doctor is if you have Keratoconus. Keratoconus is a disease of the cornea that causes weakening and thinning, presenting as an irregular forward bulging of the cornea. Keratoconus tends to run in families, so ask if any of your relatives have had the problem or a corneal transplant.

 

A rigid gas permable (RGP) contact lens can provide needed stability and correction of refractive error whether your issue is ectasia or keratoconus. Glaucoma needs to be treated and managed through medications, and sometimes, surgery. The hybrid SynergEyes contact lenses are designed to provide both support and comfort, however if you have a progressive problem you may find that a traditional RGP will be more appropriate.

 

It is vitally important that you monitor and manage your glaucoma. This increase in IOP can affect the blood vessels in the eye that may be compromised due to diabetes.

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Janlaton

SO glad you are finding an answer and a treatment for your eyes. The above post was very interesting reading!:)

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Yoboney
SO glad you are finding an answer and a treatment for your eyes. The above post was very interesting reading!:)

 

Well, I don't know if I am finding out info or not. :D I had mentioned to the doc for the past few years that the left eye had gone haywire and he always said it was 20/40 and that my complaints of blurred vision could not be true. Then I had some tests for glaucoma to rule that out as noone in my family has ever had that. Then last week I finally got another appointment with the surgeon and I requested a topography of the eyes...then whammo...he said there was a problem. Not a revelation to me at all. But I have read some and they do say that even if a person does not meet the 21 or above to indicate glaucoma that if you lower the internal eye pressure to 10 that the ectasia or keratconous(sic) is stopped and basically the air goes out of the balloon so to speak. Now I just have to worry about the right eye going bad and praying that the left eye does not get worse. I will have to ask about meds to lower the eye pressure just to see what happens and I will continue to monitor for diabetes and try to keep the sugar lower. I did notice that my right eye seems better since I have lost a bit of weight so I guess we will find out in the next few months. But in the meantime I would have to not recommend lasik to anyone with bad eyes because of this scary long term side effect that could be underreported.

 

Brad

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Yoboney
Brad,

 

Ectasia (keratectasia) is a forward bulging of the cornea due to weakness induced by trauma or surgery such as Lasik. Glaucoma is an increased pressure inside the eye. This pressure can cause the cornea to vault forward. Glaucoma can present the same symptom as ectasia.

 

The fluctuation in vision throughout the day indicates that your problem may be more related to an elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) than ectasia. It appears that you have had a stable cornea for nearly a decade after your Lasik. Although it is possible that you have developed late-onset ectasia, it is not highly probable.

 

Even a cornea that is untouched by Lasik or similar vision correction surgery can bulge forward with elevated IOP.

 

About six decades of practical experience indictaes that a healthy cornea will remain stable if at least 250 microns of corneal tissue remains untouched. There are now diagnostic medical devices that can measure accurately the amount of untouched tissue in your corneas. This would help in an evaluation if you are dealing with ectasia.

 

Another condition that will undoubtedly be evaluated by your doctor is if you have Keratoconus. Keratoconus is a disease of the cornea that causes weakening and thinning, presenting as an irregular forward bulging of the cornea. Keratoconus tends to run in families, so ask if any of your relatives have had the problem or a corneal transplant.

 

A rigid gas permable (RGP) contact lens can provide needed stability and correction of refractive error whether your issue is ectasia or keratoconus. Glaucoma needs to be treated and managed through medications, and sometimes, surgery. The hybrid SynergEyes contact lenses are designed to provide both support and comfort, however if you have a progressive problem you may find that a traditional RGP will be more appropriate.

 

It is vitally important that you monitor and manage your glaucoma. This increase in IOP can affect the blood vessels in the eye that may be compromised due to diabetes.

 

I agree with the information that glaucoma can manifest itself as ectasia and I also agree that by lowering the pressure of the eye can help ectasia even if glaucoma is not present. My vision has always fluctuated because of medicines I take. Sometimes I get tired and strain my eyes so when I talk about fluctuating vision the eyes may not actually be fluctuating but just changing because of advil etc. Nobody in my family has ever had glaucoma or keratoconus so it is probably ectasia from the lasik.

 

I hae read many articles on ectasia and I was hoping for another answer as it is very very scary. I was going to ask the doctor about lowering the eye pressure as I had read a report on a man who lowered his eye pressure and the ectasia disappeared while on the drops. My doc does not like surgery or drugs unless necessary but I would like to be able to see. Becauemy pre corrected via lasik vision was -8.0 it is pretty likely that this problem is from the surgery.

 

My doctor has said I can call him anytime and was very nice and I know why. There have been numerous lawsuits now because the docs found out in 1998-1999 that this kind of problem existed down the road. But all I want it my eyesight back. I will also keep an eye on diabetes even though I have never been diagnosed because they keep mentioning "pigment dispersion syndrome" and nobody in my family has ever had this either. So I would not be surprised if I had a sugar spike and that is what they have seen in the eye.

 

Thanks for your insight. I will keep updating my vision quest.

 

Brad

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ALICIA21
Brad,

 

Ectasia (keratectasia) is a forward bulging of the cornea due to weakness induced by trauma or surgery such as Lasik. Glaucoma is an increased pressure inside the eye. This pressure can cause the cornea to vault forward. Glaucoma can present the same symptom as ectasia.

 

The fluctuation in vision throughout the day indicates that your problem may be more related to an elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) than ectasia. It appears that you have had a stable cornea for nearly a decade after your Lasik. Although it is possible that you have developed late-onset ectasia, it is not highly probable.

 

Even a cornea that is untouched by Lasik or similar vision correction surgery can bulge forward with elevated IOP.

 

About six decades of practical experience indictaes that a healthy cornea will remain stable if at least 250 microns of corneal tissue remains untouched. There are now diagnostic medical devices that can measure accurately the amount of untouched tissue in your corneas. This would help in an evaluation if you are dealing with ectasia.

 

Another condition that will undoubtedly be evaluated by your doctor is if you have Keratoconus. Keratoconus is a disease of the cornea that causes weakening and thinning, presenting as an irregular forward bulging of the cornea. Keratoconus tends to run in families, so ask if any of your relatives have had the problem or a corneal transplant.

 

A rigid gas permable (RGP) contact lens can provide needed stability and correction of refractive error whether your issue is ectasia or keratoconus. Glaucoma needs to be treated and managed through medications, and sometimes, surgery. The hybrid SynergEyes contact lenses are designed to provide both support and comfort, however if you have a progressive problem you may find that a traditional RGP will be more appropriate.

 

This increase in IOP can affect the blood vessels in the eye that may be compromised due to diabetes.

 

It is vitally important that you monitor and manage your glaucoma.

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Time25
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I just had this surgery and was told by my doctor that during the healing process, you will need to pay very close attention in order to help protect your eyes. There are many things you should avoid doing during the 2 to 4 weeks after your LASIK surgery. First and foremost, you should never rub your eyes under any condition. The flap will take a minimum of two weeks to steal itself, and if you move it out of place by rubbing your eyes you may need further surgery. I had my LASIK done at a place called LASIK San Diego in case anyone is wondering.

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