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Margo

Sending my daughter away

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Margo

I have a daughter who is 18 years of age and she has just recently been diagnosed with reactive and fasting hypoglycemia. Basically the same as diabetic hypos with out the highs, fasting hypoglycemia is a often a precursor to diabetes. She is other wise a healthy kid. However she wants to go to Bulgaria over the summer for a mission trip with a camp. I'm not sure if if this is a good idea. Any thoughts?

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Mich

Have you checked things out on the internet?

 

I personally know several people who have fasting hypoglycemia. So far, not one has become a diabetic yet although I know it can happen. As a rule, all of them get grouchy and HUNGRY RIGHT NOW when they are low.

 

The key to handling these lows is to accompany any fast acting carb with a little protein. This helps keep the liver from releasing glucose, causing another low. It avoids the see-saw effect.

 

A handful of peanuts with a small glass of juice, peanut butter with the bread or crackers, a piece of fruit and a bit of cheese. Balance bars, Glucerna bars and other granola bars are excellent for this, but the protein and carbs should be pretty equal.

 

As the mom of two grown daughters and a retired teacher, I encourage you to send her off. The things she will see and learn will be wonderful and will be good experience for her. Have her pack some snack bars and be sure to discuss this with one of the Chaperones and your daughter so both of them know what to do if they hit a rough spot. I don't think it will happen if everyone is prepared. The fact that you are searching for answers tells me you've raised her well :)

 

Good luck to both of you on this adventure.

 

Mich

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Keezheekoni

My daughter has reactive hypoglycemia as well. She carries a meter with her at all times (she's in 11th grade). She also carries glucose tablets at all times as well... sometimes she also carries those little cake icing gel tubes.

 

My daughter travels to Atlanta every summer to be with her biological dad. She knows what to do if/when she gets low and takes care of herself. She, knock wood, hasn't had to have medics come to care for her thus far.

 

I'm sure that your daughter's travel will be a wonderful experience! Don't be afraid that she doesn't know how to take care of herself. Give her a meter (get one free, in really cool colors, in the UltraMini thread here), get her a couple bottles of glucose tables (about $5 for 100 at WalMart), and a pocket-sized pack of glucose tabs (about $1 at WalMart, it holds 10 tabs). Make sure her passport is in order, pack appropriately, hug, kiss, tell her you love her, and let her go! :D

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augoldminer

I had fasting hypoglycemia at that age I finely became a diabetic three months ago at the age of 57. and i did 4 years in the navy.19-23years old.

 

What to do to keep it from happening is to eat a balanced meal and not a high carbohydrate meal

 

One of the biggest causes in teens is they grab a high fructose corn syrup soft drink instead of a meal.

 

About 2 to 3 hours later they crash.

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Newby

I have had hypo episodes for 40 years, now prediabetic. My suggestion for travel is a medic-alert bracelet so she doesn't get mistaken for a drunk or a diabetic if she has a bad reaction. I would pass out. Keep glucose tablets handy, peanuts, don't go without eating, tell people she is with that she has this condition so no one freeks out and makes matters worse. God Bless her, hope she has a great trip, don't worry she can handle herself. Teach her and then trust.

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