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mamat

difficult teen

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mamat

How do I get my 17 year old daughter who was diagnosed as a type 1 in March of 2007 to deal with her diabetes. She doesn't check her levels enough and keeps hitting lows. My biggest concern is her hitting a low while she's driving.

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Penny

The one power I had over my kids when they were teens (they were bigger than me :D ) was their driving. If I had an important issue that I needed them to cooperate and they wouldn't, I took the keys. Sometimes you have to.

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xMenace

Make a rule she has to test before starting the car and has to have sugar with her. Failure means loss of keys for a week.

 

But good luck making a 17yr old do anything. You'll have to trust you taught her well. Fortunately, 17yr olds have great Hypo sensitivity. There's little to worry about.

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techgirl12

I'm 18, just diagnosed in May, but this summer my mom made me check my blood sugar before driving always and I had to show her - mostly just to remind me because I would forget... not because I didn't want to check.

I was really irritated, but a few times i had a low blood sugar and wasn't aware of it, so it was a good thing she made me do that.

If she is driving your car then taking away the keys is the easiest thing to do since you have that right as the parent and as the owner of the vehicle.

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EndlessJoy

I am a Type 1 who was diagnosed just previous to my 17th birthday. I have had diabetes now for half my life. I am also a mother now and I really wanted to share my thoughts with you.

 

My Mother had an unusual approach with me. She basically put me in charge. I went in to the doctor's appointments alone, did the diabetes education alone, was left to the literature, supplies etc... alone. She never tested for me or gave me a shot. She allowed me to help plan our family meals according to the existing guidelines. She gave me a lot of freedom.

 

Despite the fact that she may not be doing what you would like her to, it is important to realize that at her age, autonomy is very important. The sooner she learns to live with this on her own, the better off she will be. I made some mistakes over the course of my teenage and college years. I ate too much pizza and didn't always do everything perfectly. However, I have always felt "in charge" of my diabetes - not the other way around. And mostly, I have done very well. I am in my 30s now, I am married, and I have two beautiful children - the result of two very successful pregnancies. I work closely with my doctors and I don't have any long-term complications yet. All that I have done is the result of willpower and me taking responsibility for myself.

 

I can't tell you what to do - but if she loves herself enough and wants all the things that I wanted to have in life, she'll do the best she can.

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BlueSky
.... But good luck making a 17yr old do anything. ....

That pretty much says it all :o . A few months after our 17 year old was diagnosed with T1, she left school and moved out of home. In retrospect, I think I may have interfered a bit too much. So don't get too heavy. She is most likely still making some of her own insulin, so she is able to get away with loose control. When things get more difficult, she will figure out what she needs to do to enjoy life. And she will do it for her own reasons ... :) .

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keri

I think that its good to get them involved with other teens with diabetes, i know they don't want to but if you have them atttend some events and things where other kids their age are participating than i think that it helps them adjust.

 

and of course the taking the car keys away also is good but its hard to monitor when you are not with them every second

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keri

I just found these shirts and they are beautiful and nice and i thought it might be good to getyour child one that says :I Test

 

a Great conversational piece and i love the idea,

 

The shirts are done with rhinestone lettering, really nice

 

look at Fun, creative diabetes cases & accessories for kids and adults, walk t-shirts, insulin pump cases and support items. they are under new products

 

:o

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lgvincent

I went through a lot of difficulty taking care of myself at that age. It continued into my early 20's. I don't know what happened, I just finally realized that if I didn't take care of myself I would only have myself to blame for any problems so I changed. You do need to stress the dangers of driving while low and the importance of checking her sugar before and while driving. I've destroyed three cars but that was before we could check blood sugar, it was still in the urine sugar testing period, but I know first hand how important it is and I check often while driving. I would be willing to try talking to your daughter since I don't what this to happen to anyone else. I'm just happy I never killed anyone.

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jo jo

Hi my daughter is 18 and was diagnosed yesterday and i had so much info to take in i hadnt even though about driving.She has her driving test tomorrow and has the opposite problem of her sugars are sky high 25.3.Once she gets on insulin and gets her levels under control i will tell her the importance of checking every time she is going to drive so thankyou .

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patricia52

Just remember that being a parent is not about doing the popular thing but teaching your child to do the right thing. You would not allow your 17-year-old to drive when drinking. I think you have the right to impose the same rule for low BG. Maybe you can teach her to make testing B/4 driving a routine just like clicking the seatbelt. Your goal is to make her a responsible driver. Maybe first offense, verbal reprimand, second offense loss of keys for 1 day, third offense loss of keys for 1 week. If she goes for a month with no offenses then start over. You don't want to be so strict that she has no room to learn from her mistakes. Also make sure you provide her with what she needs to correct a hypo and check to make sure she is keeping what she needs in the car. Remember that sometimes schools put strict limits on students time. The high school in our town will not even let the students sit in their car on the parking lot. Don't place unfair limits on your daughter. What ever limits you impose, make sure they are fair and done with love, and do not seem like you are punishing her for being Diabetic.

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jo jo

I just wanted to let you know my daughter passed her driving test on thurs.She started on insulin yesterday and is abit weepy i think its all just starting to sink in and she has bruises on her tummy where she has been injecting.

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Psycho Penguin

"I went through a lot of difficulty taking care of myself at that age. It continued into my early 20's. I don't know what happened, I just finally realized that if I didn't take care of myself I would only have myself to blame for any problems so I changed."

 

Even though I am a recent diabetic, this holds true for me on everything. I am just now starting to WANT to take care of myself, and I am almost 25 now.

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MODY-RN

My 17 year old has MODY (diagnosed amost a year ago) and is not good about testing or her diet. She does remember most days to take her meds. I am trying to let her learn to care for herself as my nagging doesn't go very far and when she goes off to college and into adulthood, it will be her responsibility. She will also hear from her Endo at her next appointment about lack of testing and less than great control...

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-sammy-

i was diagnosed when i was 17 in 2007 aswell.

 

good job getting to check her bg before driving. it wud be scary for anythign bad to happen while shes driving.

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