Jump to content
Diabetes forums
  • Welcome To Diabetes Forums!

    Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today to contribute and support the site.

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

lorilei

C-peptide?

Recommended Posts

lorilei

I asked this question briefly in chat last night....what would be the benefit of preserving C-peptide production? this seems controversial...i have read c-peptide does not really have a purpose other then a biproduct of insulin production..but then again..does it help in prevention of complications (thanks john)? Just wondering what everyone elses thoughts are?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
NoraWI

The scientific community hasn't discovered the purpose of c-peptide... yet. However, it is an indicator of the body's insulin production as it is released one-for-one with endogenous (your own body's) insulin. Injected (exogenous) insulin does not contain c-peptide. As a marker of insulin production, c-peptide shows if and how much insulin the beta cells in your pancreas are producing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ErikaA

I've read that the prolonged presence of c-peptide is associated with reduced cardio vascular problems and that there's strong argument for the drug companies to leave the c-peptide on the insulin.

 

I thought c-peptide was just a signal sequence. ie it directs the insulin where it needs to go.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lorilei

Thanks Nora, that part i'm aware of...just really wonderingif there is there any benefit to going on insulin while you are still producing a little in order to preserve the c-peptide production..a couple of the 1.5ers went on a little early for this reason, but i haven't heard any concrete reasons why c-peptide itself is important...Thanks Erika, it seems to be correlated with lower complications, but cannot be pinned down as a contributor!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ErikaA

Role of C-Peptide in the regulation of microvascular blood flow.

Forst T, Kunt T, Wilhelm B, Weber MM, Pfützner A.

 

During the recent years, the role of C-peptide, released from the pancreatic beta cell, in regulating microvascular blood flow, has received increasing attention. In type 1 diabetic patients, intravenous application of C-peptide in physiological concentrations was shown to increase microvascular blood flow, and to improve microvascular endothelial function and the endothelial release of NO. C-peptide was shown to impact microvascular blood flow by several interactive pathways, like stimulating Na(+)K(+)ATPase or the endothelial release of NO. There is increasing evidence, that in patients with declining beta cell function, the lack of C-peptide secretion might play a putative role in the development of microvascular blood flow abnormalities, which go beyond the effects of declining insulin secretion or increased blood glucose levels.

 

Does this help?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
soso

can't give you any links as it is ages since I looked it all up, but I saw a lot of references to c-pep's protective properties against bowel cancer (good for me as I have had gall bladder removed-associated with higher risk of BC)

 

Also stated that people who still have some c-pep tended to have lower A1c's and there was even some talk of starting to treat T1's with some c-peptide.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Scratch

I also believe the studies done of long term diabetics it is well correlated that those diabetics who retained higher levels of residual beta cell function had better control as indicated by lower A1c and fewer diabetic complications.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lorilei

hmmm... the lower a1c makes sense since some endogenous insulin is still being produced in addition to the exogenous that is being supplemented..

Soso, you were the first to come to mind when i was asking this question..that is interesting/compelling about the colon cancer..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lorilei

Re; c peptide: "perturbations in this networking of functional and structural proteins translate into a variety of structural abnormalities such as axonal degeneration, degradation of physiologic compartmentalizing barrier systems, impaired regeneration and aberrations in C-fiber integrity. These abnormalities will eventually translate into both positive symptoms such as pain, a common and debilitating symptom in diabetic subjects, and negative symptoms such as loss of sensation, erectile dysfunction and impaired cardiac function.

 

Clinical investigations have demonstrated that C-peptide has beneficial effects on blood flow in several capillary beds in skin, muscle and forearm [3, 11-13, 15, 16]. It has beneficial effects on glomerular filtration rates and micro-albuminuria in patients with incipient nephropathy [7]. In the retina it protects against vascular permeability. In diabetic neuropathy it improves sensory nerve conduction velocity, thermal and vibratory perceptions as well as heart rate variability [18]. These effects were achieved in addition to the effects provided by tight hyperglycemic control. They suggest that optimal hyperglycemic control with insulin alone is not sufficient to optimize the protection against microvascular complications. "

 

Per the website forwarded by Xmenace..

Will C-Peptide Substitution Make a Difference in Combating Complications in Insulin-Deficient Diabetes?

 

Hmm...more food for thought...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lorilei

translation: "Researchers are starting to better understand the role of C-peptide in the body. In Europe, clinical trials are being conducted that involve giving type 1 diabetics C-peptide therapy. Results have been promising, showing decreased diabetic complications with improvements in kidney function, blood flow, and nerve function. However, further studies are needed."

 

not a research based study..but I liked the conciseness

C-peptide: Common Questions

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
NoraWI

Was not aware there was ongoing research on the function of c-peptide. If it has been found that it affects vascular function, then it would behoove the pharmaceuticals to add it to the insulin we inject.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lorilei

yup! makes you wonder as many of the sites on c peptide testing discounted it as a biproduct only..also makes one more inclined to consider insulin earlier in the game if that is an option..while they still are making their own and thus preserving their natural manufacturing of both insulin and cpeptide...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TomB

Hummm, I wonder if there's a connection. I recently started Lantus, taking a 14u shot at bedtime, and my morning numbers have dropped from a 130-150mg range to 95-110mg. Haven't seen those type of numbers in years. I also have substantial and confirmed microvascular problems. I think at my next dr's appointment I'll ask for a C-Peptide test along with the other 30 or so I normally get. Now, just thinking in what-if terms, if it is low, how does one go about fixing that?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
poodlebone
Was not aware there was ongoing research on the function of c-peptide. If it has been found that it affects vascular function, then it would behoove the pharmaceuticals to add it to the insulin we inject.

 

And then they can charge even more money for it!

 

I never thought about c-peptide before, other than the fact that my test came back zero. I thought it was just some waste product of insulin, like insulin poo. Now I want some insulin poo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
StrengthCoach

Hello,

 

I'm new to this forum and I've been having what I think are blood sugar issues for several years now. I've been through every test under the sun to test for literally everything that can be tested for. My doc is down to either telling me I have Chronic Fatigue Syndrome or Diabetes. Some basic info about me is below.

 

'08 Diagnosed with IBS

'10 Diagnosed with Idopathic Gastroparesis

'10 Oral Glucose Tolerance Test:

80 Fasting, C-Peptide 0.5

60 at 1 hour

60 at 2 hour

55 at 3 hour

I literally can't tolerate ANY sugar at all in my diet. I've had monitor results after eating under 70 and as high as 168 1 hour after eating.

 

I'm 5'8", 141lbs, 3-4% body fat, very fit and muscular. I'm exhausted ALL the time and get frequent palpitations when sitting and standing. I don't have Addison's as proven by fun test I did in the hospital early one morning.

 

Anyone have anythoughts? For energy I'm on bupropion and small doses of adderall.

 

-Kevin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lorilei

Hey Kevin~ unless I'm missing something, your bg numbers are actually on the low side although so is your cpeptide..why does you doc think diabetes?

 

I will say that I dis have some dips years before dx, but i think in some ways thatwas self induced with a carb load and recovery..and me too..carbs wipe me out regardless of the wonders of insulin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TomB

Kevin -

Your BG numbers don't look like typical levels that a diabetic usually sees. In fact, they look just the opposite. Low glucose is a common cause for being fatigued. And it is a real physical condition that needs to be addressed. I haven't a clue about why your doctor would mentioned the word "diabetes." Nor do I understand why you can't tolerate sugar.

 

Athletes, body building, strength conditioning all require attention to diet.

Good luck,

Tom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.