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CountYourselfIn

Chromium

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duck

There is wild debate that has gone on for decades over the biolavailability of chromium picolinate vs. chromium polynicotinate and the so-called Glucose Tolerance Factor (GTF). And the debate rages on today, mostly between those who sell picolinate vs polynicotinate.

 

Again, unless you are chromium deficient, taking extra chromium won't help you. But for $20 or so, it won't kill your pocket book to find out.

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overmywaders

I take 200mcg GTF Chromium twice a day and it has had a significant effect. My PCP has most of her Type2's stable on just GTF Chromium and cinnamon.

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CountYourselfIn
Are we talking just plain Chromium or Chromium Picolinate and is there a difference in the two? I am just curious because I am considering buying some to try it out.

 

All I can say is avoid hexavalent chromium unless you're Erin Brockovich.

 

Picolinate seems to be the more common one.

 

I'm not sure what kind I'm taking. Chromium chelate by Webber Naturals (I'm starting to really love this brand).

 

Here's a more broad perspective on dietary chromium:

 

Chromium information page. All about chromium and the role it plays in your diet.

 

Gonna head this one off at the pass, too:

 

"If you are diabetic, do not supplement with chromium, as it can make your blood sugar levels drop. Some people have reported a skin rash and lightheadedness - if this occurs, stop taking the supplement and consult your medical practitioner."

 

By supplement, they mean a high dose. The minimum dose is 120mcg.. most of these things come in 200mcg... diabetic multivitamins come with 100mcg... this should be enough for most people who are fit, and otherwise healthy.

 

Big people w/ D2 would benefit most from 200mcg + extra chromium each day.

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fgummett

I find that David Mendosa has a balanced view of many things related to Diabetes: Chromium

 

and here is a 2006 study looking at obese Type 2 and chromium: Chromium Treatment Has No Effect in Patients With Poorly Controlled, Insulin-Treated Type 2 Diabetes in an Obese Western Population: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial -- Kleefstra et al. 29 (3): 521 -- Diabetes Care

 

With respect, I treat anything I read on a site promoting supplements as just that... "promoting supplements" ;)

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Subby
I find that David Mendosa has a balanced view of many things related to Diabetes: Chromium

 

and here is a 2006 study looking at obese Type 2 and chromium: Chromium Treatment Has No Effect in Patients With Poorly Controlled, Insulin-Treated Type 2 Diabetes in an Obese Western Population: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial -- Kleefstra et al. 29 (3): 521 -- Diabetes Care

 

With respect, I treat anything I read on a site promoting supplements as just that... "promoting supplements" ;)

 

Interesting. Apart from poorly controlled, obese, type 2s (all three categories of which I do not fall into), it's a shame there have not been more studies.

 

Thanks for pointing out Mendosa's links to potential problems with picolinate, I am checking them out. It is the type I am currently trialing. May see if I can switch to chloride.

 

I didn't outline on my taking chromium thread, really what improvements might be of interest or potential benefit to me (keeping it open). But primarily I have what appears to be high IR and variable insulin absorption/action. The "lows" were mentioned were exactly the effect that might interest me. But as opposed to a sense of "sudden uncontrollable lows", I've found a tendency of improved absorption. Not only that, but less likelyhood to bounce. (and note, I'm not actually meaning anything more by that statement than... that statement... it's a casual, loose, interpretive, empirical observation of the last few days when my BG hasn't been affected directly by other large events).

 

Who knows if in a few days the effects are revealed as a quirk of my inherent tendency to variability, things return to exactly the same, or if it continues to lower my needs even further? I for one am interested... ;) Whatever happens I wish to make it clear it's not intended to prove a thing as far as the overall argument vs and against. In the case it significantly improves things, who am I to know I am not very rare in that instance? I do not know. My aim in general is to just give it a go for a week or two and see what comes.

 

Comments on that thread are welcome to help clarify if I seem to be grossly ignoring or overlooking some factor or possibility, in my comments, or other things salient to the issue.

 

As for replacing insulin or having a huge effect, I believe those to be generally hype statements and people should be very wary of placing "cure" wishes in this area.

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overmywaders

IMO, Mendosa did not do a broad reach in arriving at his conclusions that:

  • GTF is a fiction
  • Chromium does not decrease insulin resistance

 

If you look at the excellent recent studies on animals - who are far more cooperative in keeping to their diets than humans :) - it becomes clear that chromium, and GTF, likely have a beneficial effect. For example, "The results of these studies suggest that Cr yeast decreased the fasting blood glucose and LDL-cholesterol levels in STZ-induced diabetic rats. This raises the possibility that Cr yeast supplementation can be considered to improve carbohydrate and lipid metabolism amongst human patients featuring type 2 diabetes mellitus." - Chromium yeast supplementation improves fasting plasma glucose and LDL-cholesterol in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. (2006)

and Effect of dietary chromium-L-methionine on glucose metabolism of beef steers.(2000)

and High chromium yeast supplementation improves glucose tolerance in pigs by decreasing hepatic extraction of insulin.(2000)

and Inhibition of diabetic nephropathy in rats by an oral antidiabetic material extracted from yeast.(2006)

and The effects of inorganic chromium and brewer's yeast supplementation on glucose tolerance, serum lipids and drug dosage in individuals with type 2 diabetes.(2000)

 

When you have statements from publicly funded research such as "CONCLUSION: Chromium supplementation gives better control of glucose and lipid variables while decreasing drug dosage in type 2 diabetes patients. A larger scale study is needed to help decide on the convenient chemical form, and dosage required to achieve optimal response."; you may be forgiven if you attribute some credence to it.

 

No conspiracy theory here, but it is the kiss of death in the US for a medical researcher to come out and say that a common food supplement is efficacious. The Pharmies don't like that...and they provide most of our domestic medical funding.

 

Have you read what the NIH Office of Dietary Supplements says (in part) - "Chromium is known to enhance the action of insulin [1-3], a hormone critical to the metabolism and storage of carbohydrate, fat, and protein in the body [4]. In 1957, a compound in brewers' yeast was found to prevent an age-related decline in the ability of rats to maintain normal levels of sugar (glucose) in their blood [3]. Chromium was identified as the active ingredient in this so-called "glucose tolerance factor" in 1959 [5].

 

Chromium also appears to be directly involved in carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism [1-2,6-11], but more research is needed to determine the full range of its roles in the body. The challenges to meeting this goal include:

 

* Defining the types of individuals who respond to chromium supplementation;

* Evaluating the chromium content of foods and its bioavailability;

* Determining if a clinically relevant chromium-deficiency state exists in humans due to inadequate dietary intakes; and

* Developing valid and reliable measures of chromium status [9].

...

The body's chromium content may be reduced under several conditions. Diets high in simple sugars (comprising more than 35% of calories) can increase chromium excretion in the urine [13]. Infection, acute exercise, pregnancy and lactation, and stressful states (such as physical trauma) increase chromium losses and can lead to deficiency, especially if chromium intakes are already low [28-29].

 

When can a chromium deficiency occur?

In the 1960s, chromium was found to correct glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in deficient animals, two indicators that the body is failing to properly control blood-sugar levels and which are precursors of type 2 diabetes [1]. However, reports of actual chromium deficiency in humans are rare. Three hospitalized patients who were fed intravenously showed signs of diabetes (including weight loss, neuropathy, and impaired glucose tolerance) until chromium was added to their feeding solution. The chromium, added at doses of 150 to 250 mcg/day for up to two weeks, corrected their diabetes symptoms [7,30-31]. Chromium is now routinely added to intravenous solutions.

...

What are some current issues and controversies about chromium?

Chromium has long been of interest for its possible connection to various health conditions. Among the most active areas of chromium research are its use in supplement form to treat diabetes, lower blood lipid levels, promote weight loss, and improve body composition.

...

Overall, the value of chromium supplements for diabetics is inconclusive and controversial [36]. Randomized controlled clinical trials in well-defined, at-risk populations where dietary intakes are known are necessary to determine the effects of chromium on markers of diabetes [35].

" -- Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet: Chromium

 

We hear about the recent study from the Netherlands which "proved" the inefficacy of Chromium. However, as the study authors noted "We have to point out however, that our results may not be applicable to every Western patient with type 2 diabetes, since we only included poorly controlled patients who needed large quantities of insulin. Another limitation of our study is the lack of a pill count." Also, their subjects were extremely obese and they only had 14 subjects in each group. (see Chromium Treatment Has No Effect in Patients With Poorly Controlled, Insulin-Treated Type 2 Diabetes in an Obese Western Population Such a study is, IMO, a waste of time. Further, if you read the original paper, the authors offer no disclosure of their funding -- that, in itself, invalidates their work to many.

 

So, the question is still wide open regarding the efficacy of Cr in diverse populations. We know that some benefit (I do) and some do not. At this moment, it might be worth a try.

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CountYourselfIn
We know that some benefit (I do) and some do not. At this moment, it might be worth a try.

 

I was waiting for someone else to say it, but I <3 this thread, so I'm going for it...

 

Best, reply, ever.

 

Good job.

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Real4
I tried it for quite a while and saw no difference in my numbers. Also, my diabetes educator said that there was no evidence that it helped.

 

It is possible that for one specific subset of diabetics, chromium will help significantly, but not do anything for the rest. Typical "scientific", statistical studies would find no, or just a minor effect for chromium were this the case. Yet, it could be that for the particular "chromium sensitive" group, chromium is very effective.

 

An antibiotic can be extremely effective against infection, if the infection is bacteriological, not viral, and the antibiotic is specific for the type of bacteria. The exact type of infection is all important.

 

It may be the same with diabetes - that the exact type or cause is all important in terms of certain treatments.

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CountYourselfIn

This may be the most controversial/hated thread ever, but...

 

I love you, chromium.

 

At 500mcg daily (300 AM, 200 PM), I can squeeze by with 28 units of NPH twice daily (60 PC[pre-chromium], 3 months ago), and between 8 and 15 (at most...) units of Humalog where I was 42-48 when I first got on it. If the meal is low GI, I don't need Humalog at all.

 

All things considered, down to 26% of the insulin I started on in Dec 07.

 

End of this year I may just be off the shots altogether.

 

And yes, I'm praising chromium for playing a large factor at this point.

 

That said, a friend of mine tried it, did nothing for him.

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rwrich21
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Hello All

 

I accidently found this web site this morning and registered.

I have been diagnosed with Diabetes type II since 2005 and I take Actos 45 mg. My average levels between February and October is between 132-160 only taking actos (45mg).

 

My levels seem to go into the 200-300 range from October through mid January every year and I then need Insulin stabilize my levels. This year has been colder that most in Austin, Texas so my doctor has placed me on Novolog insulin before each meal and Levemir insulin 40 units at bedtime the first of January 2010 and she keeps increasing the insulin amount to try to stablize my levels. I do not like taking Insulin and I started yesterday again looking for natural remedies or help for my Diabetes Type II.

 

I read some good things about Chronium and Garlic I am going

to start today developing a regiment and see what happens.

I will post the results as I get them.

 

Rwrich21

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SusannaSRN

I have had wonderful luck with Chromium Xtra by Sundown. It can be a bit hard to find. My recommendation is one in the morning (400mcg) after taking blood sugar and with breakfast. You WILL see a drop in BS and will need to regulate your insulin. Please keep something to eat nearby and it is wise to take your blood sugar several more times a day to monitor results. If tolerated, increase to 2 tablets and again keep a record of BS's and diet.

 

The last person I gave this recommendation to was able to cut his insulin in half his first week (70/30 and Regular) and lost 30 pounds his first month by following a lower carb diet (lean meats, veggies and berries). He went on to lose 100 pounds. I only agreed to help him (because he was out of state) if he saw his doctor and he was ecstatic with his results.

 

The ingredients are Chromium, Inositol, Choline, Lecithin and Grapefruit extract.

 

My background is ICU nurse, and advisor/nutritional counselor for AdvoCare.

 

Here's the REASON (which a good endocrinologist will address) that Chromium works. Our soil and hence our FOODS are leaches of nutrients. Organic or not, it is the soil depletion that is the problem. Chromium deficiency is probably the leading cause of an imbalance in blood sugar that leads to a spiraling weight gain and a vicious circle.

 

But, along with diet, exercise and the right supplements, you CAN control your BS and many people find that after losing the weight and a regimen of taking Chromium which is an essential mineral, they no longer require insulin or oral medications. You WILL however always need Chromium as a supplement.

 

Thanks...hope this helps. Feel free to email me if you have any questions at curvynsweet@aol.com

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BIGJEFF64

i was taking Alpha Lipoic Acid along with my multivitamin and cinnamon before i was dx'd. i saw that my mens multivitamin has 120 mcg of chromium and my ALA has 200 mcg of chromium so i take those 2x a day so that 640 mcg of chromium plus my metformin 1000 x2 and my glipizide 5 x2. is that alot? i dont feel myself dipping down to the Hypo area and no i still dont have a meter

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Subby
I have had wonderful luck with Chromium Xtra by Sundown. It can be a bit hard to find. My recommendation is one in the morning (400mcg) after taking blood sugar and with breakfast. You WILL see a drop in BS and will need to regulate your insulin. Please keep something to eat nearby and it is wise to take your blood sugar several more times a day to monitor results. If tolerated, increase to 2 tablets and again keep a record of BS's and diet.

 

The last person I gave this recommendation to was able to cut his insulin in half his first week (70/30 and Regular) and lost 30 pounds his first month by following a lower carb diet (lean meats, veggies and berries). He went on to lose 100 pounds. I only agreed to help him (because he was out of state) if he saw his doctor and he was ecstatic with his results.

 

Sounds like dropping excessive carbs probably made a whole lot of difference. Chromium factor completely untrackable in there.

 

Here's the REASON (which a good endocrinologist will address) that Chromium works. Our soil and hence our FOODS are leaches of nutrients. Organic or not, it is the soil depletion that is the problem. Chromium deficiency is probably the leading cause of an imbalance in blood sugar that leads to a spiraling weight gain and a vicious circle.

 

But, along with diet, exercise and the right supplements, you CAN control your BS and many people find that after losing the weight and a regimen of taking Chromium which is an essential mineral, they no longer require insulin or oral medications. You WILL however always need Chromium as a supplement.

 

Chromium imbalance is the leading cause of diabetes and insulin resistance?

 

Ahhehehem--bullshiit---ahahahnemem.

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