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Emmy's_mom

Behavioral Changes?

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Emmy's_mom

My daughter was diagnosed with Type 1 nearly 2 weeks ago. My husband says she is not the same kid she was before the diagnosis. Me personally? I think all the coddling he's doing is giving her a nice big chip on her shoulder.

 

I know she must be super angry and confused (turns 4 in April) and i'm trying to find a support group for her as well as the rest of us, but I do notice mood swings - sometimes seem severe to me...

 

Is this a normal thing? He say's she's not the same, I keep telling him that it's okay and she'll straighten out...what should I do?

 

(thought it may have been due to numbers jumping around but *I* don't think they've been jumping too much)

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Penny

It is my experience that 4 year olds are "moody" people anyway. They are just starting to want to be more independent and they don't mind telling you exactly how they feel about things. They haven't yet learned that they can't say and do what they want. This has to be hard on one so young. You know they hear the adults saying things and it is hard for their little heads to digest this information. I was told I was moody when I first started insulin...I don't think it was the insulin, I think it was needing to take insulin that caused it. She might just need some time to figure things out for herself. :)

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Subby

(thought it may have been due to numbers jumping around but *I* don't think they've been jumping too much)

 

Number jumps such as.... ?

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Russell A.

I can get a little cranky when I am high, have a headache, eyes hurt, etc.. (And I am 37) So I am sure it could be a factor. Jeanette your husband might also just be hyper sensitive right now. Please do be like every doctor and blame everything on D. :)

 

Once Emily's sugars get back under control things will probably level back out. I have a 4 year old son and he knows some about D but even still would be total confussed if we told him he had D.

 

Things will get better and you will adjust quickly. It is a lot to handle at first but it will become routine before you know it.

 

Russell

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jenb

Hi Mom of Emmy - Although your daughter probably can't communicate this well, it wouldn't surprise me to find that she is reacting to a major change in her daily routine (as are you and her Dad, by the way). She may also be sensing or observing anxiety and tension between you and her Dad. That combined with her normal 4-year old kid behavior has got to make her a little unhappy.

 

Diabetes is a scary diagnosis and requires lots of small and large adjustments. People go through a grieving process (your husband perhaps?) and that's OK...your lives are changing. Talking out your feelings and acknowledging any pain and worry will help you both help Emily to adjust to her new normal.

 

It will get easier, and you will all adjust. It will take a lot of open communication and a lot of love - and you can succeed.

 

Jen

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lorilei

I agree with all said by Jen above...i have worked in peds and any chronic dx can really change how a family interacts...you are quite right to nip it in the bud before some of her patterns are established...have you asked your doc/endo for any mentor groups or the name of another parent with whom you could talk....

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eyeofgemini

Hi Emmy's Mom- My son was diagnosed not long before his fourth birthday also(6mo ago). As parents we are overwhelmed and scared by what has happened, but remember that your daughter is going through the tough part. She may seem different but give her time to adjust.Her world has just been turned upside down, and her little mind can't process all of it. Also she is still a normal little girl, try not to coddle too much. You don't want to give her the impression that anything is wrong with her. The mood swings are probably her way of dealing with the changes going on in her body at every moment.

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HollyB

I'd agree with the others here -- I worked for 25 years on a parenting magazine, and four is the age they don't tell you about. Late 3 to mid-fours tend to suddenly be a lot more moody, emotional, clingy, fearful, defiant, silly, show-offy...you name it.

 

Add in a traumatic event like a diabetes diagnosis, and it's not surprising your daughter seems more volatile. Heck, I felt like that after my son was diagnosed -- like bursting into tears one minute and laughing with gratitude that he was still alive the next!

 

I would say give the whole family a few months to adjust to this new normal, especially your daughter. Lots of love, lots of calm reassurance that she can handle this challenge. And patience.

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LisaMustac

I have a 22 month old just diagnosed. His numbers jump around a lot and I can say since a while before his diagnosis ( we brought him to the hospital DKA so it was brewing for a while) He has become a very cranky kid. The tantrums and crying last all day everyday. The doctors say it has nothing to do with his numbers he is just hitting terrible 2's but I dissagree. I think all the highs and lows affect their body and mood. Sadly they just can't fully express how they are feeling.

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dr.sweet

hii.. all of the things said up is right and i agree with it .So the problem with ur Emmy is a normal thing since she is a child and she is in her first days of this disease . eventully in the next weeks she will get use to it as my cousin did ( 7 year old)

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howdysf

I'm type 1, diagnosed at age 32, my brother was diagnosed at age 12.... I noticed (even though I was only 8) that my brother was "not the same".....don't know how to explain, but your husband is probably right..... it's funny, I've been on both sides of this disease now....

My brother became a lot more moody, etc..

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brendersue

I was diagnosed at age 6 - the week before Christmas. talk about attitudes! What do you mean "no cookies," mommy? <much wailing and screaming follows>

The only mood changes my folks ever saw were my tendencies to get VERY cranky just before dinner, esp if I'd been playing hard all afternoon. Every pre-dinner argument between my older brother and I was settled with: "Brian, leave your sister alone. Brenda, eat a banana."

She will be OK. My mom was VERY overprotective and it got to the point where I was afraid to go anywhere without her. She demanded a lot of attention from friends about her role in my healthcare. How she really had a handle on exactly what I needed and when. Eventually, I was terrified to go to sleep-overs or even be away from her for a few hours. That resulted in a lot of destructive behaviors when I hit my teens - sneaking candy, etc. out of defiance (and the apparent lack of immediate consequences). we didn't have meters or any way to ever know what our glucose was - just urine dipped tape that always turned really dark green. UGH. It's a wonder any of us survived! I didn't learn to give my own injections until I was into my teens and that was a big drawback. I also wasn't taught to do any measuring, choosing or counting of foods. I was "chained" to my mom and I resented it. Please teach your sweetheart to be her own best healthcare provider and be sure she understands the effects of stealing sweets (when she's old enough, show pictures of cellular damage, etc.) Might have kept me from spending 9 months legally blind in my early 20's.

Godspeed, dear one!

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ant hill

Hello Emmy's Mom :), I have been a diabetic now for 38 years and I can remeber my first low and it's scarey to say the least as you feel weak, Disoriented, Confused and all you can think about is the fast carbs and if someone contradicts your need of that food then I can get irritable and quite angry. At the age of four I can imagine how terifying it can be. I feel the pour child's horror. :(

At her age I would think that she would learn quite quickly and get to use the Blood Glucose Meter herself as she can get to understand how she is herself and get the understanding of good food, Exercise and insulin relationship.

 

Diabetes can be confusing as to the non diabetic. Listen to her as only she knows how she feels. I wish you all the very best of luck. ;):)

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OctShadowz

Hi Emmys mom,

 

I understand where you are coming from. I was diagnosed at the age of 5. Your daughter is still young. She might not understand what is going on at this time, and it will be difficult for her and your family. As with any child, diabetic or not, there will be moments that they are acting just like a normal child would, with tantrums and crying.

 

I think that the hardest part for me when I was diagnosed was that I couldn't eat anything I wanted. I felt that I was cut off from the rest of the childern at school because teacher wanted to give everybody a treat for being good and all I would get is a coloring book or something else. It was hard for my mother because ,with any young child, I did not want to stay still for taking a meter reading or a shot. All I wanted to do was just go outside and play. I didn't know why I saw all these different doctors every 3 months or why they took blood out for HbA1c's. I had a hard time trying to understand it all at such a young age.

 

Its not easy but i hope that you can find the help that you need. When school comes around I hope she will be able to not feel left out of activities just because she has this condition. I wish the best for you and your family.

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ccryder19

I'm a type 1 diabetic since age 11, my little sister was diagnosed a few months before me at age 3. My dad made my mom take her to the doctor because he said she wasn't the same little girl. She was always sweet and patient and never cried or complained. Suddenly she began having mood swings and would really get impatient and stubborn....anyway turns out it was the diabetes. Any high or low glucose will affect a person's mood-this includes a very young child so rest assure that as you work hard to normalize her blood sugar levels, she will return to "normal". My sister did and 15 years later is now about to head off to James Madison University in the fall. It is very difficult to take care of such a young child with diabetes. Hang in there and know that most likely your child will be a very compassionate, grateful, and hardworking individual because of having to grow up this way.

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momof2pumpers

Hi Emmy's mom! My second son was diagnosed 4 weeks ago, my first son 2 yrs ago. Your life as you knew it is changed. My son's are 14 and 21. Our experience is that they say they felt rotten for the first few weeks, and therefore, "moody, quiet, etc" My friend who's 17 month old was diagnosed, said her daughter expressed herself with biting her mom every time she had a fingerstick, or shot. I am sure it is impossible to communicate with a 4 yr old the neccesity to hurt them several times daily because we love them.

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Kai31410
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