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dalfandre

breastfeeding help

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dalfandre

I had a c-section last week...at 34 weeks gestation because I had pre-eclampsia. My son was bottlefed in the NICU with formula. The hospital wouldn't consider letting me even pump until I was out of ICU myself (even though I was fine) which was right at 2 days. All of this was extremely upsetting. Since then (8 days), he won't/can't latch on. I've been pumping every 1.5-2 hours but still can't get more than half an ounce total each time. I am very distressed and hate the fact that I have to depend on formula. Does anyone know if being diabetic (almost 21 years) has anything to do with lack of milk? Any advice on getting him to latch?

 

Please help.

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mazea

I don't have any advice that comes from experience. I'm planning to breastfeed myself. I have heard there is a lot of problems that can happen in breastfeeding so I am doing an Australian breastfeeding association course this month. The association has breastfeeding councellors that have helped a lot of women with breastfeeding. The reason I mention this is maybe there is a similar organisation in America you could call?

 

Good luck and I hope you get some more replies.

 

If it is a manual pump, the small amount is usual. I read in a book called baby love it takes a week to express a single meal from a manual pump. An electronic pump produces more milk and might be worth looking into.

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ccryder19

I also just had a c-section due to preeclampsia. I was almost 36 weeks with twins. The babies didn't go into the NICU but because I was totally drugged up on magnesium sulfate and couldn't see straight or even hold my babies we didn't try breastfeeding for 2 days either. I really know how you feel, I hate depending on formula as well and now 3 weeks later still have trouble getting the babies to latch on. We have made some progress...they latch on now...but then they don't really suck out any milk or they fall asleep or get frustrated. I pump every 3 hours or so and at first only got half an ounce but since then it has increased to about an ounce an hour. I still have to supplement with formula though and I hate being married to the pump. I try to at least hold the babies close to my chest to increase milk flow and to picture them in my mind when pumping. Hang in there and let us know of your progress. Don't give up! And lets hope I don't either lol

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dalfandre

Thanks...I'm sorry for your frustration. Congrats on the twins!!!!!

I'm not giving up, but it sure feels better to know I'm not alone. Good luck and thanks for the reply.

Keep me posted on your progress.

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e||ement

congrats on your baby!

 

fortunately my son had no problem latching on...but i've had friends whose newborns have had trouble. the best thing to do is keep trying. a friend of mine couldn't get her daughter or son to latch until they were close to 2 months, then they were great breastfeeders. she jet kept trying.

 

keep the stress level low over it, babies can sense tension like that.

 

i did visit a breastfeeding clinic when i had trouble with something else, and they were great. do you have access to something like that? a la leche league or something?

 

at the end of the day, i know you want to do what you feel is best for your baby by nursing and feeding him breast milk. but, really what's most important is that he is fed and loved. so, just keep trying and he may latch yet.

 

are you trying to get him to latch before you pump?

 

as for the pumping, that is no indication as to whether you are producing enough milk. i could never get a lot with the pump...but when my son was latched on there was more than enough.

 

good luck!

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genie86333

My daughter swallowed blood during my c-section & couldn't be fed except thru IV until it was all out of her system.

 

A pump didn't do a thing for me...just like you I had trouble getting much of anything, but I was determined to breast feed & my doc told me how important it was to get as much milk as possible to keep from drying up - I finally gave up on the pump & expressed the milk by hand into the bottle. It was a lot of work & messy but worked so much better than the pump & I actually brought my milk in without my daughter ever breast feeding until later.

 

Congrats on your son's birth. Don't be discouraged. Even if you do have to use a bottle, it is still a wonderful bonding experience.

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Taytesmommy

Hello all! I just had my 3rd son, in March, and he was born at 36 weeks. He was in the NICU for 3 days-just to be monitored but he was bottle fed right away and I was worried that this would impede upon me breastfeeding him. He was a great latcher but I had to pump and bottle feed because they wanted me to measure how much he was drinking he time as he was only 5lbs 12oz and wasn't gaining weight. I rented a breast pump-the hospital grade kind and that is what kept it going for me. It was the Medela Symphony, which is the one they supply here in Canada in the hospital to use. I ended up purchasing the Medela Freestyle which is costly but it sure works great! I kept up witht he pumping, every 3 hours during the day and night to make sure my supply didn't go down and I was also perscribed a medication called "Dom Peridone" or also known as "motillium" and that helps with supply as well. Try contacting your Laleche league or do you have a health unit that has a lactation consultant? We had just about everyone helping me to keep my supply. My son now is strictly breastfed, he is 14 weeks, and I still take the prescription to make sure the supply is kept up. There is also a big breastfeeding guru, out of Toronto, Ontario, named Jack Neuman who has a website that I found extremely helpful. It has lots of information on how to establish milk supply, what to do if yo have a low milk supply etc. Remember the goal-to breatfeed, and as tired as you are...keep the pumping up! I hope it all works out for you.

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cynthiazinn

I breastfed each of my children for 14 months, so I consider my self a bit of an expert on the subject. Find a comfy chair and try a cradle position with a pillow or boppy for support. Stroke baby's bottom lip with nipple and wait for him to open very wide like a yawn. Push all of your nipple and as much areola as possible into mouth. When correctly latched his nose and chin will both touch your breast and you will be looking at his shoulder which is in line with his ear, hip, and heel. Allow him to suck for 10 min. then switch to the other breast. If you feel you are not producing enough milk the easiest way to boost supply is to pump exactly inbetween each set of daytime feedings for about 10 min. on each side, even if you don't get anything b/c it's the nipple stimulation that helps boost supply. So if you nurse at 1pm and 3 pm, you should pump at 2 pm. Do this for 2 days and your supply will double. Another comforting measure is to weigh baby on a nursery scale without changing his diaper before and after feeding this will tell you exactly how much he is getting. Stop using a bottle ASAP, those little one's are amazingly sharp at figuring out how to get what they need!:)

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Keezheekoni

I have plenty of experience with nursing preemies, unfortunately. :(

 

One thing that I want you to know for sure...most preemies *will* end up breastfeeding by the time they would normally be 40 weeks gestation. :) This is exactly what happened with my 32-weeker who is now 5 years-old.

 

Now, switch whatever bottle/nipple set you're using to The First Years' Breastflow bottle system. For some reason this bottle tends to be the one that babies learn to really breastfeed with. Use the slow flow nipple (Stage 1), since that will imitate breastfeeding flow the best.

 

Definitely get a double breast pump. If you can't afford to buy a Pump In Style (the best pump out there), then rent one from your local hospital's Lactation Department. Also, make a few appointments with the lactation consultants working there.

 

Find your local La Leche League and call the leader. Ask her to come to your house and watch you trying to latch your baby on and she'll give you great tips. After that, go to the monthly meetings!

 

To get your milk supply up, start taking Fenugreek supplements (in the herbal supplement section of most grocers). Take two capsules, three times a day, with meals. Drink TONS of water, cut out caffeine! Also get some Mothers' Milk Tea and start drinking a cup or two a night before bed (you can usually find this in the herbal tea section of your local grocer).

 

Lastly, once you get the baby to latch on properly several times a day (not to necessarily feed, just latching), go out for a day of shopping with the baby and forget to take any bottles. If the baby gets hungry, only offer the breast... my preemies this worked like a charm. It only worked at the 40 week gestational age though. Any earlier and it might have backfired.

 

I'm currently breastfeeding my 6th baby, born on 6/24 via c-section. I've had a ton of problems with the incision and was readmitted to the hospital for 3 days last week. Luckily we didn't have to supplement baby with formula since DH was willing to run back and forth to the hospital with him for me. However once I got home baby has been latched on for nearly 24 hours a day! LOL

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