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Delphinus

- What Is The Problem With Injecting Too Close to the Navel? -

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Delphinus

Doing some Googling and I really can't find a clear answer. Most answers have a wierd mist surrounding them almost a slime or a purplish haze about them, and it really makes it hard to see them clearly.

 

Does anyone know?

 

Or is it just an absorption thing? Like it's pointless if you stab your navel by accident because it isn't subcutaneous?

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slwood321

This is from an ADA thing I found as I was also wondering the same thing.

 

"If you inject in the abdomen, don’t do it too near the navel. The tissue there is tougher and makes the insulin absorption less predictable."

 

It also mentions avoiding moles & scars but doesn't say why. I'm assuming it for basically the same reason as the belly button.

 

Hope this helps.

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xMenace

The next person with an endo visit please ask! This is something i've always wanted to know. I can't believe I've never asked before.

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Harold

The navel is a scar. It is not only a scar on your skin, but also through to the membrane sac that holds all of your internal organs. You really do not want to be poking any holes through the membrane. Same is true for any scars from surgery.

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Subby

Interesting point Harold. And, I can also attest that the closer I get to my naval, from about 4cm away, the more the absorption really sucks. For me.

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fgummett

Maybe it comes under the heading of "old wives tale" but I understood that because the navel was the former point of attachment via the umbilical chord, there may be blood vessels relatively close to the surface there.

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foxl

In any event it is definitely different from the surrounding tissue. I remember studying it in histology ... but not what made it different :o !

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pdxdennisj

An answer bwould be interesting. I was instructed to avoid both the navel and an appendix scar from when I was about 4.

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foxl
An answer would be interesting. I was instructed to avoid both the navel and an appendix scar from when I was about 4.

 

Scar tissue is generally LESS vascular.

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Subby

Here's my layman's understanding (complete with layman's terms), so corrections received happily.

 

Subq injections work because the insulin trickles down (for want of a better word) at a relatively even rate, through the fat into the minor blood vessels below/around it. Injecting into scarified tissue just won't have the same action. In a sense it is indeed because it is less vascular (or less connected/able to pass insulin on to blood vessels) that this kind of flesh is a problem.

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dbaratta
Doing some Googling and I really can't find a clear answer. Most answers have a wierd mist surrounding them almost a slime or a purplish haze about them, and it really makes it hard to see them clearly.

 

Does anyone know?

 

Or is it just an absorption thing? Like it's pointless if you stab your navel by accident because it isn't subcutaneous?

 

I read an article/study that suggests giving rapid acting insulin near the navel and long acting insulin in the leg. (outer side of the leg) All I know is that when I switched my lantus from my belly to my leg it seemed to work better. Theory is that the leg is slower to absorbe....not sure.

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foxl
I read an article/study that suggests giving rapid acting insulin near the navel and long acting insulin in the leg. (outer side of the leg) All I know is that when I switched my lantus from my belly to my leg it seemed to work better. Theory is that the leg is slower to absorbe....not sure.

 

Which is to do with distance from center of body (or so I have read :) ), more than tissue type. But something I shall need to keep in mind - interesting!

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SammyIamToday

My endo brings it up every time I go. She says it has slower absorption rates and will throw things off. Also recommends against going too high because you can hit diaphragm muscle and that makes it go too fast.

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e||ement

hey just wondering, would that be the same for the stretch marks on my stomach from pregnancy? slower absorption in stretch marks?

 

...curiuos.

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Injecto

It's a good question, and yet there is no real reason given, with solid medical evidence, why you can't. You can do it in your boob, thigh, arm, but not your belly button, that is, near it.

 

I've been playing around with getting closer to my belly button, and have had no issue within 1 inch. I'd say it's very different for everyone and again, do tests on yourself. Simple enough to find out if it's good enough for you or not.

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