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ODAR

:smokin: Smoking and T2D

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ODAR

Hi All - Just wanted to rant and maybe get some advice...

I was diagnosed with Type 2 approx. 2 months agon. I embarked on a diet and excercies way of life to controll the diabetes. With all the support and information from this forum I was feeling really good about it and thought I had it all under my control. Then on the weekend... I decided that ok, now I really should try and QUIT smoking! ( I must point out that at this stage - I am not overweight but do carry the excess around my middle. And that prior to starting my new way of life Iweighed 75kgs. With low carb and exercise I went down to 70.4kgs - not much but I am lifting weights so put it down to conversion of muscle tissue). Anyhow went to a chinese herbalist ( at this point I was only after some bitter melon tea). After him checking my pusle etc - he said that my pancrease and liver was struggling to cope with all the different medication I was taking ( for cholestorl and thyroid) and said that first thing I have to quit.. and promptly inserted some magnetic thingys in my ears.. gave me two different lots of teas - one for detoxing the body and the other to calm nerves etc... cut a long story short.... over the weekend with having a cigarette here and there I have managed to (a) undo all the good by constantly pigging out on so healthy goods and consequently my weight increased by 2.2kgs and worse of all my blood sugar went right up to 147.60 ( my average reading after meals was always nearly 100 - 104. My am reading prior to breakfast this moning was 117!

Least to say I was not happy and promptly took out the magnetics thingys from my ears and dispensed with the various potions and teas. It cost me $120.00 but at the time I was really hoping that this treatment would help me to quit smoking but not at the expense of my diabetes. Also I must add that I felt really weird all weekend ... really restless and tense! Any advice about how to quit smoking but still keeep the weight and blood sugars down? Help as I am really desperate to beat this thing!:confused:

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jtausch

just go cold turkey, eat celery or carrots when you fel the urge to smoke. Be prepared for you BS to go up because of the stress of trying to quit

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AngelKitty

Quitting smoking is one of the hardest habits to break.

First off - Good on you for taking the initiative and getting motivated to try and beat this vice.

My uncle quit smoking by going cold turkey and constantly chewing gum. Basically every time Uncle G got a craving (which seemed all the time to me!) he would pop a piece of gum in his mouth and try and keep busy to distract himself.

 

Hope this helps - stay strong - you can do anything you put your mind to - you just have to want it bad enough.

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Subby

Alan Carr or Gilian Riley both have great books on quitting smoking, basically mindsets to cold turkey, I'd recommend looking them up. Both tap into what I think can be instrumental to quitting with conviction - getting the understanding that it is a choice, that you make that choice not through feeling deprived but through sticking to your convictions and taking it a step at a time only, (chose for the next 5 minutes), and that while a drug addiction can be very strong and take some time to receed both physically and mentally, you will get relief if you keep it out of your system - relief after some days (as the effects of the drug leave you) relief after some weeks (as the "lifestyle" of smoking leaves you, and you start realising you can relax/get through the day/whatever without sucking fumes) and relief after some months (as you realise first hand that you are better off in every way without smoking. More relaxed, more money, more energy, more healthy, more everything.) Do it without deprivation or resentment and you will know that you are strong enough to stick at it no matter the circumstances, and smoking also simply recedes into a non-issue for you some time down the track.

 

The point of reading one of those books is that while we often grasp things intellectually very easily, you need to spend times with the ideas, let them sink into how you think, make them a part of the mix of what goes on up there. Make the ideas that work for you your own. Good luck with it. I didn't find it easy the first few weeks or month or so, but being acutely aware that it was a choice each and every step of the way and time to take responsibility and make no excuses for myself (although that was always an option... if I wanted) really got me quit in a wonderfully freeing way.

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Hammer

Get the nicotine patches. When you try to quit smoking, you are faced with two hurdles, the first is the psychological addiction to always having something in your hand and in your mouth. Since you have the desire to stop, you can fight this psychological desire, however, the second hurdle, the physical addiction gets in the way, so you need to control the physical addiction.

 

By using the patch, you don't chew on anything, which helps to control the desire to have something in your mouth, and the patch controls the physical addiction.

 

The reason you physically crave a cigarette, is because your body craves the nicotine. Once you've smoked a cigarette, your body has gotten it's "nicotine fix" so you don't feel like smoking another cigarette....until the nicotine levels in your body drop to a certain level, at which point you want another cigarette.

 

The patch feeds this nicotine craving, so there is no physical hurdle to overcome. This allows you to focus on the psychological hurdle. Over time, you use a lower and lower level of nicotine patch, so that eventually, the level is low enough that you can fight it. By then, you should have beaten the psychological hurdle.

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Ti-Jae

I tried cold turkey several times, some kind of smelly liquid stuff that was supposed to be worn beneath your nostrils to keep the cravings at bay--the name of which I can no longer recall--and nicotine patches. I successfully used nicotine gum a couple years ago. For the first three weeks or so, I didn't visit my mother or other family and friends that smoked, although I did keep in contact in other ways (phone, e-mail, etc.) The temptation was just too great for me during that stage. I'd take a walk, clean something, play with my cats as needed to distract myself with physical movement. Good luck! I'll be over here in my little corner cheering you on. ;)

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Subby
Get the nicotine patches. When you try to quit smoking, you are faced with two hurdles, the first is the psychological addiction to always having something in your hand and in your mouth. Since you have the desire to stop, you can fight this psychological desire, however, the second hurdle, the physical addiction gets in the way, so you need to control the physical addiction.

 

By using the patch, you don't chew on anything, which helps to control the desire to have something in your mouth, and the patch controls the physical addiction.

 

The reason you physically crave a cigarette, is because your body craves the nicotine. Once you've smoked a cigarette, your body has gotten it's "nicotine fix" so you don't feel like smoking another cigarette....until the nicotine levels in your body drop to a certain level, at which point you want another cigarette.

 

The patch feeds this nicotine craving, so there is no physical hurdle to overcome. This allows you to focus on the psychological hurdle. Over time, you use a lower and lower level of nicotine patch, so that eventually, the level is low enough that you can fight it. By then, you should have beaten the psychological hurdle.

 

Maybe, and more power to people who find patches help.

 

I found them to be a misguided approach and the above rationale to be sheer bunkum. Keeping an addiction alive for months while "training" away the so-called habits that was fed by the thing that caused the addiction, was in my experience, a completely artificial and and, well, tortuous road to embark upon. The people I have met with patches and the irritation and resentment and denial they have usually radiated as they unnecessarily nurse big time nicotine addiction while simultaneously "dealing" with the cravings and associated actions (what a ridiculous position to be in to my way of thinking...), has often reflected my own experiences.

 

Just a personal take. Those making a huge amount of money off NRT make it sound so undeniably logical and rational, don't they...

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Hammer
Maybe, and more power to people who find patches help.

 

I found them to be a misguided approach and the above rationale to be sheer bunkum. Keeping an addiction alive for months while "training" away the so-called habits that was fed by the thing that caused the addiction, was in my experience, a completely artificial and and, well, tortuous road to embark upon. The people I have met with patches and the irritation and resentment and denial they have usually radiated as they unnecessarily nurse big time nicotine addiction while simultaneously "dealing" with the cravings and associated actions (what a ridiculous position to be in to my way of thinking...), has often reflected my own experiences.

 

Just a personal take. Those making a huge amount of money off NRT make it sound so undeniably logical and rational, don't they...

 

I can't speak for others, only what my experience was. I used the patch for about 10 days, and never needed to use them again. The thing about the addiction has many aspects. I enjoyed the full feeling in my lungs when I inhaled, I enjoyed the act of lighting the cigarette, the smell when you first light it, the smell of a new, unlit cigarette, giving your hands something to do while you were talking to others, etc. There was a whole series of actions, feelings, as well as the physical addiction that were involved.

 

The strongest was the physical addiction, so by removing that aspect, I could focus on the rest. The patch worked very well at stopping my craving for another cigarette, and to me, that was 2/3 of the battle. The other 1/3 was easy to overcome. Again, this is just my experience.;)

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Subby

Yep, that was never questioned, Hammer. I wish short term use of patches was what nicotine replacement therapy was about. Sadly, the emphasis of doing it "properly" is to remain addicted to nicotine for some weeks or months at a time...

 

And yes, again as I said, more power to people who do find that it works for them. I'm not here to argue, but provide another voice as to what best and more useful realities I found when giving the ol' cancer stick up.

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SteveFromIowa

I used Chantix for 6 weeks. It removed the physical withdrawal symptoms leaving me with "only" the psycological dependence issues. That made it a lot easier for me.

 

Chantix isn't for everyone and there has been some negative press on it. But it helped me. I smoked for 27 years.

 

It has some weird side-affects. Vivid dreams so realistic I was convinced it really happened. Every night, I dreamed I smoked. I was angry with myself during the dream for failing and that anger lingered for some time after I awoke convinced that it had really happened.

 

That was a little over 2 years ago. I haven't had one puff since I quit. I gained 25 lbs. I've lost 12 of that now and still working on the remainder.

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Subby

Steve, I had a few of those dreams when I was quitting! What a strange feeling of disorientation, when you realise it didn't actually happen and you've been beating yourself up over a dream...

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lark 27

Quitting for me first involved several attempts that were unsuccessful (nicotine gum, hypnosis, attempts at cold turkey). I do think those efforts did eventually help me quit. When I eventually did quit about 5 years ago I went "warm turkey" by first reducing the number of smokes a day over a couple weeks. 20 down to 10 was "easy." Even 10 to 5 was OK because I could still get the fix at key points during the day. Knowing I could do that then helped me go to 2 and then 1 and then none. The last few days of having 2 or 1 I also had a set date where I was going to not smoke anymore. I threw out a carton even though I still was smoking a couple a day. Another key was my wife: we both quit together. It was a stressful home for a bit but it really helped. Also, an online forum was really helpful. I don't remember where, but I think it was through the American Lung association or Cancer Association. I also really set the goals in mind of why I needed to quit. I consciously spent time each day during the phase out process and especially the first week after quitting thinking of the reasons (my health, hope to raise a family, wish to go for a bike ride without getting winded...).

 

You can do it,

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ODAR

I read the Allen Carrs Book "Easy Way to Stop Smoking" last night as recommended by someone from the Forum -- Subby I think it was ... well I havn't even got halfway through the book but something amazing happened.... overnight and today ... I just don't feel for a cigarette:confused: Also I don't have any desire to put a subsitute in my mouth .. ie food:o

I don't know what is happening or what happend but I am absolutley thrilled. I can't wait to finish the book... also I don't feel stressed, anxious etc etc... no negative feelings at all. I am hoping this will last .. but according to the book I am supposed to keep smoking whilst I read the book. However everytime I lit up... I couldn't taste the nicotine or anything so just threw the cigarette away:D If there is anyone out there who is trying to seriously quit smoking... please give the book a go! I have been smoking for 35 years and I can honestly say without a word of lie .. something positive is definitely happening..... Thanks to everyone for their help and encouragement ... I am really over the moon.

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Subby

Sounds great Odar, but make sure you take it a day at a time, expect some bumps! Things are sure to get harder but then, they will get easier... it's the long haul that matters, the longer the better...

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Subby

Hmm, I just thought maybe that seems like cold water, not meant to be. I think this is great news! You are proving to yourself just how fine you can do without cigs, and you may feel better and better. A few days and you apparently have a great deal of the nicotine out of your system. Great! I am sure in that book there is a rough timeline for benefits as they occur... you may well find your own ones yourself as well as you go along.

 

I find it interesting that even with no presence of a certain drug in my system, I found cravings can still occur if the mind is suddenly oriented towards the drug in a certain way (not necessarily seeing smoking or being near smoking... more just a random reaction, I find for myself). Even now, some years later, I might get one strong craving every few months. (BTW at that rate, it's no problem at all, it's almost like seeing an old friend briefly for five minutes and a reminder of past experience). So removing the drug will get rid of a lot of it, sure, but your thought pattern may trigger off what feels like a visceral physical reaction as well. Just something to remember, not to be surprised if down the track you still get some strong physical cravings even with none in your system. Get through them in the way you will become accomplished at, and they will ease up.

 

Great going! You can do this, that is a certainty...

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ODAR

Its now 3:00pm here in Perth Australia and my last full cigarette was last evening at around 9:00pm ( without meaning it to be my last!!). I am expecting at any moment to crash! and almost waiting.. but so far so good. I think I want a cigarette - go to light one and then wham I can't taste the nictotine and to some extent I can't seem to smell it so I just ditch it out. I have no illusions that there may be hurdles but I am sure I once I finish the book I will be able to cope.

Thank you once again Subby for your support:D I really really appreciate it.

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Hammer
Its now 3:00pm here in Perth Australia and my last full cigarette was last evening at around 9:00pm ( without meaning it to be my last!!). I am expecting at any moment to crash! and almost waiting.. but so far so good. I think I want a cigarette - go to light one and then wham I can't taste the nictotine and to some extent I can't seem to smell it so I just ditch it out. I have no illusions that there may be hurdles but I am sure I once I finish the book I will be able to cope.

Thank you once again Subby for your support:D I really really appreciate it.

 

Odar, when you feel like you need to light up, come here and tell us about it. The longer you avoid lighting up, the easier it gets. If you can keep your mind occupied with other things, then you will not think about smoking.

 

It has been one day and you haven't smoked. That's great! One day at a time is what you need to focus on. Don't think about next week, think about the next minute. Taking it slowly like this is a lot easier than taking in large chunks of time. Post something here instead of lighting up. We are here for you.:)

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ODAR

I will take that offer up - its day 2 and so far so good... the techniques I am told to use is great....I am not missing out on anything by not smoking... but if I smoke or have just one more puff.... I have sooo much to loose:mad: At the moment it's nearly lunchtime here in Perth so I am looking forward to my food... something which I really was never interested in before... have to watch my consumption of food now - but hey one day at a time.:T

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Hammer
I will take that offer up - its day 2 and so far so good... the techniques I am told to use is great....I am not missing out on anything by not smoking... but if I smoke or have just one more puff.... I have sooo much to loose:mad: At the moment it's nearly lunchtime here in Perth so I am looking forward to my food... something which I really was never interested in before... have to watch my consumption of food now - but hey one day at a time.:T

 

Yes, it's one day at a time. Once you make it past today, then you can concentrate on tomorrow. Don't think about tomorrow, think about today. If you are able to make it till the end of today, that's great! You should congratulate yourself. That's one day you've made it without smoking.

 

I applaud you for going through this day without smoking! Okay, you made it through this day, now let's see if you can make it through the next day. Let us know how you are doing....even if that means posting every ten minutes. We are here to help you through this. Don't feel as if you are "bothering" us with your progress. You are not. We want to help you through this, so feel free to keep us up to date. We care about you and want to see you through this.;)

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Subby

Just to add to Hammer's comments, even if you were to go back to smoking now (I am NOT trying to jinx you at all) but even if you were - you've already really proved something to yourself and that you have some powerful answers. If you do fall off the wagon by deciding to have a smoke sometime (and it is always a choice), nothing is lost (maybe a little time, not a big deal), it's all still gain, gain, gain, proof and experience that you can get through the day without smoking. You just pick yourself up, dust off and do it again when you feel ready. And some time you will leave the need to go back, behind you.

 

How great is it to feel you've got some answers to all those fears that smoking and smoker myth fuels, that you can't even last half a day without a cig? :) And even if there are really tense times, how great to realise that just relaxing about it, feel "so what?" about it when you have a craving right now but you will get through it and forget it in 5 minutes, and "so what?" if another comes soon, you just need to get through some time and they get less and less... as long as you don't stress!

 

OK I've spoken enough! The important thing is you frame this for yourself on your terms, whether you share your "way" or not.

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ODAR

Its day 3 and yeah last night was pretty hard ... late night shopping .. traffic , kids - stress...but managed to go one more night without a cigarette but today kinda feels flat... not really as motivated. Thanks goodness I am pretty busy with Accountants and Auditors - this is the first time I am able to post anything on the forum:o

Have no smokes but am really fighting within to go buy some but then I think No!... UUUGH real .....real ..... not nice!!!

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Hammer
Its day 3 and yeah last night was pretty hard ... late night shopping .. traffic , kids - stress...but managed to go one more night without a cigarette but today kinda feels flat... not really as motivated. Thanks goodness I am pretty busy with Accountants and Auditors - this is the first time I am able to post anything on the forum:o

Have no smokes but am really fighting within to go buy some but then I think No!... UUUGH real .....real ..... not nice!!!

 

Hang in there Odar! Do something to take your mind off of smoking. That usually means some type of exercise like walking. If you can't get out to walk, then maybe do some type of housework like dusting or vacuuming. Trust me but that craving will pass.

;)

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reefedjib

I'm a smoker of 29 years. The only time I stopped was for Basic Training in the Army. I have tried numerous ways to quit over the years, inlcuding Wellbutrin (or whatever they call it for quitting smoking), Nicotine Patches, Gum, Chantix, Alan Carr's Easy Way to Quit Smoking, and cold turkey at least 5 times. The longest I have been able to make it is 10 days. I just enjoy it too much, psychologically. At this point, I have given up on quitting.

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