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CarlyesHope

New Onset Diabetes at the age of 12

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Catie and Emily

kelly

 

even though me and Emily arent 11 or 12 or close around Carlyes age we would be happy to talk to her still.

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CarlyesHope

Thank you, i will try to get her on and see that she has lots of support even if she doesn't feel like it.

 

All of you have been so very nice. I hope that you all got the support you needed from equally as wonderful people!!

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daddyo

Kelly if you are thinking about minimed they were very good at setting me up with a pump I don't know if I should put the gal's name on line but she was very helpful and did just about all the work for me checking insurance and contacting my doc's for everything I have needed to this day I call her and she returns my call in a very timly matter

also about SS I myself have contacted them and I'm still wating was turned down but never give up the back log of cases is about 1 1/2 years my case will hoppfully come up in the next 4-5 months it takes time I applied back in sept 03 as far as kids go I beleive you have to be over 65 and your kids under 18 to get benifits for them and they will stop when your child Carlye is 18 I knew a girl and that was the case for her hope this helps I to live in michigan the detroit area

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CarlyesHope

We live in the detroit area also, and thus far i have had no issues with regards to the social security, as a matter of fact, it has been rather easy. I am no where near 65, and according the some law profs i know, and the web site, that is not a requirement. I was just wondering if any of you knew that this benefit might be available to you. it is worth checking out...

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Catie and Emily

Well Mick posted his story so I think I will tell ya about my story.

 

So Carlyes and Kelly here is my story how it affected me:

 

It was on June 17th, 1989 when Emily and I, Catie were born in Michigan. We were both healthy as could be and that was great for the family that was going to be adopting us in Ohio. Years passed and it was June 2004. School was out and we were looking forward to our 15th birthday, a day I would soon regret.

Emily and I were really close. I would tell her my problems and she would tell hers. We did everything together. She noticed I was drinking a lot of water, which was not normal for me. I had also started not being able to sleep or if I did, I would just wake up over and over to use the restroom. She couldn’t stand seeing me always drinking and

complaining that I was so tired and losing weight.

We had also needed a sports physical for basketball, which I was going to be playing for my high school. We were finally called into one of the rooms and they took my temperature and all the other medical procedures. The doctor did the sports physical then finally asked what had been going on and how I felt. Emily said I had been acting funny and told all the symptoms. He remembered that our family had many diabetics and thought that might be it. With this in his mind, he took blood from both Emily and I to make sure we were OK. He sent it to the lab next door where they tested our blood. We were all so nervous while this was going on. Maybe our questions would be answered maybe they wouldn’t. The results came back and they said Emily is all right but Catie is not. The doctor finally got the words out,

"I am sorry to say this but the reason why Catie has had the

excessive weight loss along with always being thirsty and going to the bathroom 4 times every half hour is because she has Type 1

diabetes." They just shook their heads.

In my head I thought that everything was going to be all right, thinking that I have a cousin my age with type 1 also. I had learned alot about it since we would stay at her house during the summer.

I had gotten used to all the finger pricks and the injections. I was doing great and felt better than before. The doctor put me on the insulin Humalog then finally prescribed Lantus also.

That August school had started back and we were freshman in high

school. It was the time to tell all my friends, my family, my boyfriend, and most importantly the people who would be at the school each and every day, my teachers. I had thought about it over and over thinking, "What happens if they don't accept this or should I really tell them." I had been doing great and everybody accepted it but I still had to tell my boyfriend of 8 months. I was scared thinking what he would think.

 

It was still 2004 and Thanksgiving was approaching and I had received a pump earlier than expected. I was so happy that I would only have to be taking 1 shot from now on. So many months had passed to get this far, It is now 2005 and doing great, even better than before. I have updated from a Minimed 508 to a Cozmo and it has been wonderful. I have even got off the Lantus. I am now in the 10th grade and Emily is still diabetes free also. We are proud supporters for a cure of diabetes. I have and will also be proud that I got this disease instead of my sister Emily.

Update: It is now Feb 2005 and the part about Emily still being non-diabetic has all changed. Emily was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes on Jan 30th, 2005 and is now living with Type 1 diabetes along with me her sister and best friend. She is doing great and living a health normal teenage life. I had wished that Emily would not have to go through this but I am glad she is going through it with me. We are glad

we are going through it together because if she had it and I didn't I

wouldn't want her to go through it by herself just like if I had it and she didn't she wouldn't want me to go through it by myself.

 

Catie and Emily

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CarlyesHope

mick,

 

this is carlye

wow.............. that is amazing!!!!! i never thought of life that way. i don't know if i could handle what you went through. you are amazing. but i am still having trouble exepting diabetes, could you help me out?

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CarlyesHope

Catie and Emily

reading your story now

read the first sentance and wondered what happened to your mom and dad?

why were you adopted? why didn't you go to a relative?:thumbsup:

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Catie and Emily
Catie and Emily

reading your story now

read the first sentance and wondered what happened to your mom and dad?

why were you adopted? why didn't you go to a relative?:thumbsup:

 

Well we were adopted because are real mom back then worked in a factory and couldnt take care of us and she knew that our mom now couldnt have kids but wanted some and knew that she would be great for us so yea. They were best friends also. They are still living but have split now. O and later in my story it will say we were freshman then moved to sophmores in the same year well we did we skipped and moved up so yea many people wonder since I dont specificy why that happened or did you get ur grades wrong.

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duck
Hidden

Actually, when I calculated my C:I ratio, my CDE had me start out at 10 to 1. What I did was kinda like testing basals...I waited until my sugars were about 140 four hours after eating and four hours after my last bolus. I ate a slice of bread and took a bolus based on the amount of carb at 10 to 1. I was a bit high four hours later, and the CDE said I should try 8:1--which worked.

 

It seems to me nowadays that my C:I is different at different times of the day, but I have yet to tweak that...

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CarlyesHope

Catie and Emily

I loved your story. that is so sad!!!! You had the same symptoms as me.

I don't want my sister to go through the pain either. She hates shot, can't take them, so can't give them to herself, so can't poke herself, and she has the stomach of a full grown man!! ha ha ha

 

 

 

carlye

PS your story made my mom cry...ahh

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Catie and Emily
Catie and Emily

I loved your story. that is so sad!!!! You had the same symptoms as me.

I don't want my sister to go through the pain either. She hates shot, can't take them, so can't give them to herself, so can't poke herself, and she has the stomach of a full grown man!! ha ha ha

 

 

 

carlye

PS your story made my mom cry...ahh

 

How old is ur sister carlye

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gettingby

So Kelly or Carlye,

How did today go?? Has it gotten any better? I'm really interested in knowing. Please keep us updated because we are all really concerned and will help in any way we possibly can. :D

Sorry Catie and Emily for going :topic: . My bad. :o

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soremom

After reading Catie and Emily's story, it got me thinking of me and my sister.

I first had gestational diabetes. Eight months after my son was born I was diagnosed with T1. That was Feb. 92. On June 11, 1992 my younger sister was also diagnosed. Since she was at college most of that year, my parents weren't able to see the symptoms. She ended up in the hospital for a week, which I didn't have to since I knew the symptoms from the pregnancy and when they started back up I got right to the doctor.

 

Now why I am typing, we have a younger brother. He was scared to death about also being diagnosed. I have a fear of needles, but can over come it. He is worse than me. Our first Thanksgiving after diagnoses was horrible. My mom tried to make everything has little of sugar as possible. We told her never to do that again. We just won't eat it, or just a little of it. Dinner from now on has been good. It has been 13 yrs for me, almost for my sister, and my brother has not had a problem. Hopefully never does. Now I just worry about my boys. It is nice to have someone who know what you are going through, though sometimes it can be a pain since they know so much too. lol

 

Kim

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CarlyesHope

Cin,

 

Today was better, Carlye has been on the site and reading people stories - which i have been encouraging her to do for days. The bad part is today is better becuase she was surrounded by people, she had a full day at school, she had friends hugging, teachers giving her attention, i came up and gave her lunch and monitored her shots, then she went bowling - her favorite sport - and she got even more attention there! It is the times when she is alone and can ponder her "disability" that i worry about her. I cannot entertain her 24/7. I am hoping that one good day will make tomorrow better even thought it won't be filled with as much attention.

 

another downfall is that tomorrow is her first dr appointment since leaving the hospital.

 

And, she has to miss a field trip to the Detroit inst. of Arts - one of her favorite places - because they won't be gettig a lunch until 1.5 hours past thier usual time and they feel they can't be responsible for Carlye so they have asked that she doesn't attend.... I decided i would take her down but i am not happy about the exclusion.

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duck

And, she has to miss a field trip to the Detroit inst. of Arts - one of her favorite places - because they won't be gettig a lunch until 1.5 hours past thier usual time and they feel they can't be responsible for Carlye so they have asked that she doesn't attend.... I decided i would take her down but i am not happy about the exclusion.

 

That's discrimination--I'm ready to curse again but I don't want to force Harold to do his job...

 

Okay, since this is her first week, maybe they have a point. But after y'all get comfortable with this, don't ever accept that type of attitude again, please.

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CarlyesHope

hahaha!

i kind of figured you'd chime in sooner or later!! I know its discrimination, but right now i would rather they tell me they are not comfortable then for a mistake (say perhaps oh death) to be made and for them to later say well, we were not really comfortable, but we didn't want to exclude her and we were afraid of getting sued so we just took her along.

 

I'm expecting an earful at the doctor today and can't wait to get back and vent...

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archimeech

I doubt very seriously anything horrbile would happen to her, but it's good that they are concerned. Carlye is still in the "honeymoon" phase, I'm sure and her insulin requirements aren't as drastic as they will be later on in life. I'm sure the hour and a half wait for lunch could be tolerated. Being that it's so close to her diagnosis, it's very understandable that they and you want to be cautious.

 

The biggest thing I've learned so far is that sometimes, "Life just Sucks" but it beats the alternative. That's the revelation I had when I was about 13-1/2 that made me change my mind about what I posted earlier in this thread. Everyday is a struggle, you feel like crap sometimes, then there is that window of 30 minutes where you feel like a normal person again (right before you start to have your sugar go too low! lol). For me, diabetes is a roller coaster ride, that I just happen to have a lifelong ticket to and there's no one running the break...

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Brent44a

Carlye & Mom,

 

I can't answer why. I can only tell you that my outlook has changed. When I was diagnosed, I was pretty cocky. I was an army officer that had been to most of the hellholes in this world, including two years in Saudi Arabia and one in Central America. I thought I was tough. Lean and mean was the way we described it. Diagnosis with diabetes reminded me that what counts is on the inside of a person. Sometimes the exterior is just a front. So have heart, having diabetes sucks, but you will find strength to overcome it that you never knew you had. And Mom, you will always feel an affinity for your child that other Mom's will never understand. I know mine still does :hypocrite

 

In the meantime, I guess I'll keep following the 11th Commandment: Hangeth in there! Moses did, we can too!

 

Take care,

 

Brent

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Brent44a

Oh, yes. My apologies to the people in Saudi Arabia and Central America. I have also been to places in the United States that I wish I hadn't been too!

 

Jeez, now I need to apologize to those in the US that are offended. Maybe I should just shut up and to work!

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Mick

Carlye--

 

"I don't know if i could handle what you went through." Anyone COULD go through almost anything--it's kinda like, until we do, we're not so sure. It's like a test--until you take it, you're not certain you will pass. This diabetes thing IS a test. Passing it means living your life. There's no room for failure...

 

"Wow, that is amazing! You are amazing." Naaah, I never felt I was amazing or anything, just pretty ordinary and average. At least, I think I started out that way. Maybe battling diabetes for so long has made me a very determined and tough person--good thing! But, I am made out of no more and no less than you are. The potential to be a hero is there in any of us. It only takes living up to that potential, day by day.

 

"I never thought of life that way." What way? As an adventure? Mine has only been an adventure because that's the way I went after it--I never allowed it to happen, I went out and persued it, sometimes with a vengance--maybe because I had something to prove. Maybe I'm still proving it... Good things don't just happen, happiness does not just fall into your lap. It takes resolve, determination and boundless optimism--the belief that your cup is not half empty, but rather half full...

 

"I am still having trouble accepting diabetes, could you help me out?" I hope I might be able to. Like I just said--Optimism is much of what I've used as MY survival technique. That half-full cup--what's it filled with? Anxiety over the future, or anticipation and excitement? Fears and doubts, or confidence and creativity? I'm not sure if it's important to believe in god, but I know it's important to believe in yourself. In your ability to be strong, be positive, and be intelligent enough to win. In your ability to be stubborn enough to break thru doubts and negativity and be patient enough and wise enough to hang on when the going gets tough.

 

Take it easy on yourself, and listen to silence every day--you can hear a LOT when you are very still.

 

Michael

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CarlyesHope

Michael,

ok, well i take your advace, but i will still hate my life for a good week or two or month.

Did you ever feel this way, i mean like crap?

oh and is it true is your family doesn't have a history of diabetes you have a 95% chance of getting it and people who do only have a 5% chance? is so, why? :confused:

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