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CarlyesHope

New Onset Diabetes at the age of 12

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am1977
Kelly and Carlye, welcome to the forums!

Carlye your name is spelled beautifully!

 

First off, I am not a parent. I do have the greatest mom in the world though. And I attribute everything that I am now to her. I was Dx’ed at the age of 11 and hospitalized for two weeks with critical DKA. My mom was with me every step of the way. I am the only person as far back as we’ve been able to trace my paternal and maternal family tree, who’s had diabetes, in any way, shape or form, so it was all new to us. A week into my hospitalization, my older sister (13 at the time) was put in the ICU with Toxic Shock Syndrome (which occurs in a small amount of women who wear tampons – sorry guys) and her vital organs shut down. My mom had a double blow; one child who would have a life-long disease, another who was dying. And somehow, in spite of this, she gave both of us the emotional and physical support that we needed during this time. I do not know, to this day, if she cried when this was happening; I imagine that in her quiet times, when no one was around, she must have. But she was a font of strength at a time when many people would have fallen apart. I am the resilient, strong, capable woman that I am today because of my mom’s influence and character.

 

I remember when I was about 14, I was bawling on my mom’s shoulder about how life is not fair and I hate having Diabetes and how it makes me different from the other kids and that just SUCKS. My mom patted me on the shoulder, and told me that I’m only as different as I MAKE myself. Sometimes things in life just don’t happen the way we want them to, but I have a chance to become a better person, a stronger person, because of my circumstances. She also said that there’s nothing I can do about it, so I have two choices. I either spend the rest of my life feeling sorry for myself, or I can choose to OWN my disease and not let it own me. She also told me that I have no right to feel sorry for myself, when there are kids in the world who are starving, who are dying from incurable diseases such as leukemia, and who would trade spots with me in a minute.

 

Kelly, kids cry. Just wait until she gets her heart broken for the first time. You think this is bad…. ;) You’ve still got your child, no different than the day before, and you need to be her strength right now.

 

Carlye, I am going to tell you what my mom told me, in my own words. Sweetheart, life’s not always fair. And you can either feel sorry for yourself and hate your disease, or you can USE it. You think you have it bad? Go visit a pediatric oncology ward (that’s kids with cancer). I was a PCA (personal care aide, like a home nurse) for a child your age that was shaken as a baby. He can’t see, can’t talk, can’t walk, can’t eat food by mouth, wears diapers and is basically like a big, 12-year old baby. He doesn’t have the opportunities that you have. Life is an opportunity; you just have to be willing to see it. This ISN’T the end of the world. You can do everything that you did before you learned that you have Diabetes. Don’t hate it; if you hate it, you give it power. You’re in control here, not your disease.

Knowledge is POWER. Carlye, learn AS MUCH as you can about every aspect of your disease. Know yourself inside out; it’s not only important that OTHER people know what to do should you have a hypo, it’s doubly important that YOU know what to do, and that you know how to recognize it. You’re the one who’s living with this and you’re the one who’s got total control over every aspect of it.

 

So keep smiling and FIGHT THE GOOD FIGHT!!!

 

Shy

 

 

:thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

 

Shy gave you some truly excellent advice. I don't think anyone could say it any better! :)

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Carwy

Dewey has diabetes, goes to school and takes care of me. I have cancer and we are now trying to get everything done so I can get a Stem Cell Transplant.

When I feel down about my cancer I look at the people at the VAMC who can not see, walk, or are missing limbs and I know I'm in better shape then they are and I thank my luck stars.

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koblenz

OK, WOW, Carwy, Shy, Dew, and everyone else FANTASTIC advice. I am no where as eloquent as these folks, so I say DITTO to that.

 

I'm only good for the occasional stupid joke.... but then again, I use that to my advantage. Keep a positive attitude and don't ever let anyone or anything tell you that you "Can't"; you CAN!

 

In the imortal words of Master Yoda: "No, there is no try, only do or do not."

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CarlyesHope

You guys are the best. Carlye reads these wide eyed and amazed. She prints them out, rereads them and them puts them in her purse or folder. Mabye it is sinking in that this has changed her life but it hasn't destroyed it. She looks forward to coming home after school and reading everyones thoughts and stories....Thank you so very much for helping us through this...

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CarlyesHope

Okay,

 

Carlyes numbers were doing great, we could see a pattern, now, over the course of the last week we've noticed her nightime numbers are very high

againbut her breakfast numbers are getting lower or staying even..

bfast lunch dinner bedtime

127 149 277 216

122 176 219 255

141 205 167 238

193 forgot 239 349

143 194 134 241

141 201 264 271

132 198 165 290

92 253 337 307

110 235 277 439 (ouch)

104

 

why is this??? :confused:

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duck
Okay,

 

Carlyes numbers were doing great, we could see a pattern, now, over the course of the last week we've noticed her nightime numbers are very high

againbut her breakfast numbers are getting lower or staying even..

bfast lunch dinner bedtime

127 149 277 216

122 176 219 255

141 205 167 238

193 forgot 239 349

143 194 134 241

141 201 264 271

132 198 165 290

92 253 337 307

110 235 277 439 (ouch)

104

 

why is this??? :confused:

 

You need to tell us what times the readings are taken, and what time(s) and what kinds of insulin she is taking...Then we can summon the voodoo and let you know.

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archimeech

Also what her level of activity was, her stress level, did she exercise any, eat something weird or out of her normal diet. She could also be coming out of her honeymoon period earlier than most do. Was it the usual site for her injection, was it a new bottle? Is she getting enough sleep? Is her moon in someone else's house, or was she just out mooning people while walking in her sleep? :D

 

sometimes there are no immediate answers. Unfortunately we all can't have that even control, like that there, Razer fella'! ;)

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CarlyesHope

Okay altought i try very hard to stick to a very tight schedule, when she is with her father, i don't always have control here are the two days that vary the most and why:

 

143 194 134 241 bedtime taken at 12:00am

141 201 264 271 lunch taken at 2:43pm

 

Her usual schedule is: 7:00 am breakfast

12:13 lunch

6:00 dinner (give or take 1 1/2 hour) - for her dad's laziness

bedtime 9:00 (give or take 1 hour)

 

she was not mooning the neighbors, nor was she being mooned. Her father did switch from regular injections to using the novalog pens for some of her injections.

 

she varies sites from legs to stomach all the time

no ratical change in diet

not taking any other meds

 

she takes novalog 15:1 for lunch and dinner and over 150 for her blood sugar with a correction of 50 = 1 unit

for bfast it is 12:1

 

Lantus we are giving 20 units at bedtime now.

 

Bedtime has always been her higest reading even before we started giving the lantus separate from the novalog at dinner....

 

does that help?

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dixiepixie64

Kelly,

I saw something really interesting on the internet a few days ago. I wish I could remember which site...anyway it was a line chart comparing total daily dosage of insulin for boys and girls during their teen years. Teen girls had a very marked peak increase in insulin needs between 12-13 years old and then it declined steadily until adulthood. Teen boys it was like 15 years I think that their needs peaked. But the point was that they had a large need for insulin in their systems during that year and then it declined steadily thereafter. I was an adult when I was diagnosed T1, so I can't speak from personal experience, some of the others here might remember if that was the case with them.

 

Just FYI, something for you to keep in the back of your mind.

 

If I find the site where I saw it, I will post it for you later - darn it, I tried to find it again just now but I just can't remember what I was searching for when I ran across it.... :confused:

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duck
Kelly,

I saw something really interesting on the internet a few days ago. I wish I could remember which site...anyway it was a line chart comparing total daily dosage of insulin for boys and girls during their teen years. Teen girls had a very marked peak increase in insulin needs between 12-13 years old and then it declined steadily until adulthood. Teen boys it was like 15 years I think that their needs peaked. But the point was that they had a large need for insulin in their systems during that year and then it declined steadily thereafter. I was an adult when I was diagnosed T1, so I can't speak from personal experience, some of the others here might remember if that was the case with them.

 

Just FYI, something for you to keep in the back of your mind.

 

If I find the site where I saw it, I will post it for you later - darn it, I tried to find it again just now but I just can't remember what I was searching for when I ran across it.... :confused:

 

I think I saw it on childrenwithdiabetes.com...Part of their recommendations on that site is entertain the option of taking oral drugs typically taken by Type 2's for teens with Type 1 to get them under better control. Interesting premise.

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CarlyesHope

someone else mentioned that it could be she might be getting ready for her first "girly thing".....the poor kid, everything at once.... any truth behind that?

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daddyo

Extreme tight control is very hard. For one thing on Lantus you get, or are supose to get a level amount in 24 hrs. It does'nt always work that way. For instance I use a pump and have diffrent basil rates thoughout the day. Also I use three diffrent basil patterns for the week. This depends on what I'm doing that day. Activity level and so forth. Also when on MDIs I would use my thigh's for days active and my stomach for unactive days. Got better #s that way It's realy trial and error and chk.chk.chk. Everybody is diffrent.

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koblenz
If I drew the map out right, sounds to me like Lantus is running out a bit earlier than anticipated...

 

Yeah, way early, and a good thought. Her before breakfast readings look consistent, then she shoots right up. :confused:

 

Have you tried testing her BS 2 hours after a meal? I know, more testing, ugh! What I have been told (and read) is that at about 2 hours after a meal, I should be no higher than 30 points more than my pre-meal reading; that also assumes I was in a good range (say 90 - 120) pre-meal. If you test at 2 hours and she is still way high, then perhaps it is time to discuss adjusting her insulin:carb ratio with your health care team.

 

Just a thought... and I am by far not the most experienced diabetic here. But please don't get discouraged... I think you both are doing great. It took me a few months to find my "magic" numbers. And now that I just started a pump, I am having to test and adjust again.

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gettingby
someone else mentioned that it could be she might be getting ready for her first "girly thing".....the poor kid, everything at once.... any truth behind that?

It's possible Kelly. I don't know that the other gals on here, but my insulin requirements change around that time. When I first read the numbers, that was my first thought but I was trying to find a polite way to bring the subject up. :D

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HeatherP

My sugars most always shoot up into the 200's about a week "before", so it's entirely possible since she's at that age.

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archimeech

The stress and trauma she's gone through in the past few months may have also helped her along in that respect. It freaked me and my wife out when one of her neices actually began her period when she was 11! Can you imagine that? Everytime I think about all this stuff I'm SSSSSOOOOOOOOOOOO glad I'm a guy. (not just for being able to pee standing up at a concert! :D ) I tell women who ask me what being diabetic is like, that it's as if you have your "P" all the time, but man!, what do you diabetic ladies go through!! wish I could go out and hug each and every one of you...

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koblenz
... what do you diabetic ladies go through!! wish I could go out and hug each and every one of you...

Meech, Oh Behave! :- ;)

 

Kelly, the "girly thing" could be it. Like Meech, I have no advice there, can't relate sorry.

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gettingby
The stress and trauma she's gone through in the past few months may have also helped her along in that respect. It freaked me and my wife out when one of her neices actually began her period when she was 11! Can you imagine that? Everytime I think about all this stuff I'm SSSSSOOOOOOOOOOOO glad I'm a guy. (not just for being able to pee standing up at a concert! :D ) I tell women who ask me what being diabetic is like, that it's as if you have your "P" all the time, but man!, what do you diabetic ladies go through!! wish I could go out and hug each and every one of you...

LOL Meech. Yeah, we go through alot. With me, it's like take the bi***iest person you know and multiply it by 10. No, seriously, it's not much more than having to change insulin and carb ratios and a few ups and downs. We manage. You guys probably couldn't live with it. LOL.

Thanks also to you and Koblenz for being mature adults about it. :D

Oh yeah, I will wait patiently for my hug. LOL j/k.

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CarlyesHope

well, the drs. deceided to change her insulin to carb ratio - personally, i think it is to make more confusing. so, breakfast is now 10:1 instead of 12:1 and lunch and dinner are now 12:1 instead of 15:1 but, look at yesterday and todays numbers - - she hit her all time low this morning...

 

104 218 221 145

77 165

 

77 is the lowest it has ever been since being diagnosed.

 

I had her in my care for these readings, her father for the high ones - - i'm starting to get suspicious....

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archimeech

her dad may very well be allowing her to eat more or take less insulin or something to that tune. maybe he feels uncomfortable about the whole thing and is scared to death of letting her go too low. Or he's just comforting her with food.

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gettingby

Kelly,

If it is at all possible, you need to sit down with Carlye's dad and make him see that whatever he is doing, it is not good for Carlye's health.

Meech may be right in that he doesn't understand. He needs to know that this is not something that is gonna go away if he chooses to ignore it. If you can't sit down with him, then have him go to one of Carlye's endo appts with you and her. Let the endo explain it all to him. Sorry if this is harsh but in the end, constant highs will hurt Carlye.

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CarlyesHope

The question is, can the change in numbers be contribued to human error, or could it be something related to, like we said, 1st period, old insulin (i threw mine away after sitting out for 22 days), or things like that. I have to be very, very careful when/if i accuse(or even sound like i am accuing) her father of things.

 

Carlyes step dad believes that we really need to educate Carlye on all aspects of diabetes so that she doesn't have to depend on her father, however, they have already argued about who was right on one topic, they went his way, and it ended up she was correct.... so what good did it do her to argue?

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am1977

I think what makes Diabetes such a frustrating disease to manage is that it's not an exact science. Sometimes as much as you analyze what could have gone wrong and how you ended up with an unexpected blood sugar, you just can't figure it out. There are SO many factors that influence blood sugar, I'm sure you are learning that. To really dwell on why something is the way it is, to me, is just a waste of time and you will only drive yourself crazy. I know, I've been there ;) . Don't get me wrong, I think it's important to keep log (something I need improvement on) and to try to identify patterns, but to try to overanalyze things is another story. What's better is to keep log/identify patterns, like I said, test often, and treat any lows and highs as soon as you can. If there are patterns, then it's good to bring it to the attention of medical team. They can help you take it from there.

 

You are asking some really good questions and I hope we are helping somewhat. Keep firing away, the best way to learn is to ask. :)

 

Take care :)

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