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mazea

hypos and breastfeeding

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mazea

I have noticed that my 2 1/2 month old bub refuses to breastfeed and can not sleep sometimes. I have a feeling that these times he can't fall to sleep or refuses my breasts and cry is either when I am hypoing or a situation that I call hypoing at 5.1-5.6.

 

Hypoing at 5.1 is a situation that endocrinologist has described as novorapid hanging around. What happens is my novorapid hangs around in my body and every three hours I have a dump of insulin in 5 minutes(ranging from enough for 2 g of carbs to 30g carbs) The novorapid not hanging around doesn't send me into a hypo until I eat food but I have hypo symptoms of insomnia and dizziness/ inability to think) I have the hypoing at 5.1 thing 2 hours after breakfast, 4 hours after breakfast, 2 hours after lunch, 4 hours after lunch and 2 1/2 hours after dinner.

 

It was particularly bad when I was pregnant as I had these drops twice a night and could not sleep. When I had my baby I was diagnosed by the doctor as having sleep deprivation when I woke up and couldn't move one night and my blood sugar was fine.

 

I know insulin doesn't cross breastmilk as it is a protein that is broken down as soon as it enters the stomach. Would it be hormone related then. Does hypoing cause hormones or stress hormones like cortisol?

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Subby

Mazea, what does the 5.1 indicate?

 

Yes, a hypo will cause a release of stress hormones, in a hypo your body is in one of those situations it pulls out the stops to keep moving and in action. I don't know if what releases you have/are having, would be considered significant enough to be causing the problems you relate with bub.

 

A few extra things, given the problem you describe that you and your endo hypothesis are to do with the bunching and tail end of boluses - here are some ideas. I just spit em out because they strike me, I know you're not necessarily asking for all the answers.

 

1. change diet so that food lasts longer and requires a little less "punch" of the rapid acting. Less need for bolus really would help you, too.

2. Eat a snack at those times.

3. Get a pump and use square bolusing

4. Have you basal tested to absolutely confirm it is not excessive basal? I'm not saying it's always easy, but some form of skipping boluses in a controlled manner, is the only way to be certain it's not basal problems.

 

Hope things settle down.

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mazea

Hi Subby,

 

5.1 is 5.1 mmol.

 

I have bolus tested. I wake up the same as before, but when I was 6.1 mmol and had 1 tablespoon of breakfast the other day, and dropped it so I had the measure another , my bs dove and the ambulance nearly had to be called as I had a bad hypo. I actually have no memory of the event but my husband fed me skittles. BS dove because of the 5.1 hypo thing- I eat 1 g of carb and my bs drops 10 points 3 hours after dinner, waiting till morning at 6.1 the drop waited all night until I had that tablespoon of breakfast.

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mazea

thanks subby for those things.

 

I find my basal very difficult to test when my insulin is hanging around. I can be 6.1 at night and 6.1 in the morning on two consequetive nights, except one night I eat 10g carbs and the other I eat 0 carbs at 12 ocklock. TThis happens all the time I take insulin and it hangs around but doesn't activate. A tail end usually ends within 5 hours. This is the tail that goes all through the night. No matter what insulin amount I take, my basal tests are the same.

 

WHen I am not pregnant or breastfeeding, I can do basal tests successfully as you do.

 

When I don't eat the 12 carbs at 12 am, I find that I have a hypo when I start eating breakfast at 7.00am. This is what happened the other day. I was walking back from the kitchen and talking to my husband and wham, I was shaking and unable to respond. My husband says he fed me skittles. I don't even remember him giving them to them and didn't initially believe him.

 

Anyway I might try to go back to a lower Levemir amount. It's just guesswork really as my basal requirements at the moment are not flat. Unfortunately no basal insulin can have peaks and troughs every 2 hours.

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Scratch

If your basal profile has a lot of peaks and valleys or wide variation between the highest peak and lowest valley, then you might want to consider pumping which gives greater flexibility in basal dosing schemes.

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mazea

thanks scratch.

 

A pump would be ideal.

 

As my insulin to carb ratio has doubled and halved (twice the insulin requirement) in the last 3 months 5 times it might be difficult to set up a pump for my needs.

 

My insulin to car ratio halved again and that is why I ended up unable to respond last week when my husband nearly called the ambulance. At the time I nearly passed out, There was too much Levemir in my system, it didn't activate at night then remained dormant until the morning when I ate 1 tablespoon of food and it activated.

 

The brestfeeding caused my morning readings to go high just before lunch and my readings high just before dinner which is why I upped my Levemir 1/2 unit higher than needed. I have decided not to do this anymore.

 

I took 8 units Levemir (needed about 7 1/2units Levemir) and I have been dropping 3/4 Levemir every day at 12.00pm. I now am on 4 units Levemir. (needing 4 units of Levemir.)

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