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Hammer

What drives you bananas?

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Dowling
1 hour ago, Hammer said:

Well, my dentist doesn't give me an itemized bill.  When my office visit is over, they say that they'll send the bill to the insurance company, so I have no idea what the bill is.  Whatever the insurance doesn't cover, the dentist will bill me for, and when they do that, I only see what they billed me for, not what the total cost was.  I go to my dentist twice a year for my checkups, and unless I need something, like a root canal or a crown, my insurance typically covers 100% of the bill.

 

My dentist doesn't give me an itemized bill either but they do send one to my insurance company because my insurance company sends me a list of what was done, the price and what they paid. For us it is not important to get an itemized bill because insurance is paying for us. I never see a bill and I don't care if I ever do. The dentist's office bills my insurance and the insurance pays the bill so there is no need for me to see what was charged.

 

However if the money is coming out of your pocket you should get an itemized bill. The same type of bill as the one they send to insurance companies. You wouldn't take a word of mouth bill for car repairs so why should you take it from a dentist. They are the same type of service company--one fixes your teeth and the other fixes your car

Edited by Dowling

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Hammer

I'll say this again...I hate these new key fobs for your car, that you don't need to start the car or open the doors, you just to have it in your pocket, and when you pull on the door handle, it will unlock the car, and to start the car, you just push in on the start button.  To be able to do that, the key fob needs to be constantly transmitting a signal to the car, which means that it's draining the battery in the key fob.  Today, when I was clearing the snow off of my driveway, I needed to start up my cars and move them.  When I got to my Dodge Durango, the key fob battery was almost dead.  It wouldn't unlock the doors, but the fob has a metal key in it that you can remove, and use that to open the door, which I did.  When I pushed in the Start/Stop button, the dash said that there was no key fob nearby.  When that happens, you need to place the key fob right next to the Start/Stop button as you are pushing the button in.  Apparently, the fob is still sending out a signal, but it's very weak.  Okay, so in the event that the battery is completely dead in the key fob, it won't work, which means that it could leave you stranded somewhere, with no way to start the vehicle.  You'd think that they would at least have a regular key slot for the key that's contained inside the key fob, to start the vehicle, in the event something like this happens, but no, I guess the engineers weren't smart enough to think of that.

 

I tried both key fobs, and I got the same result.  Once I finished clearing off the driveway, and moved the two vehicles back in place, I went inside and replaced the batteries in both key fobs.  Replacing the batteries is a total pain in the butt.  It's easy to open up the key fob and remove the old battery, but trying to put it back together is a real chore.  The plastic case comes apart easily, using a screwdriver, but trying to push the two sides back together takes forever.  I had to lay the fob down on the table, and use both hands to push down on the fob to get it to slowly close.  I thought that I was going to break the key fob!  The batteries in the fobs lasted about two years, so I guess I'll have to do this every two years.  Wasn't it better when you just had a metal key that you stuck in the ignition switched and turned it on?  No batteries, no fobs, just a mechanical switch that you turned on manually.

 

Oh, and just to mention...once I had the fob open, I could see the electronic components inside the fob....all $10 of them, and by claiming that they cost $10 is being generous.  So it makes you wonder why it costs $325 to get a new key fob?  I guess the explanation is called, "Rip-Off"!

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Dowling
31 minutes ago, Hammer said:

I'll say this again...I hate these new key fobs for your car, that you don't need to start the car or open the doors, you just to have it in your pocket, and when you pull on the door handle, it will unlock the car, and to start the car, you just push in on the start button.  To be able to do that, the key fob needs to be constantly transmitting a signal to the car, which means that it's draining the battery in the key fob.  Today, when I was clearing the snow off of my driveway, I needed to start up my cars and move them.  When I got to my Dodge Durango, the key fob battery was almost dead.  It wouldn't unlock the doors, but the fob has a metal key in it that you can remove, and use that to open the door, which I did.  When I pushed in the Start/Stop button, the dash said that there was no key fob nearby.  When that happens, you need to place the key fob right next to the Start/Stop button as you are pushing the button in.  Apparently, the fob is still sending out a signal, but it's very weak.  Okay, so in the event that the battery is completely dead in the key fob, it won't work, which means that it could leave you stranded somewhere, with no way to start the vehicle.  You'd think that they would at least have a regular key slot for the key that's contained inside the key fob, to start the vehicle, in the event something like this happens, but no, I guess the engineers weren't smart enough to think of that.

 

I tried both key fobs, and I got the same result.  Once I finished clearing off the driveway, and moved the two vehicles back in place, I went inside and replaced the batteries in both key fobs.  Replacing the batteries is a total pain in the butt.  It's easy to open up the key fob and remove the old battery, but trying to put it back together is a real chore.  The plastic case comes apart easily, using a screwdriver, but trying to push the two sides back together takes forever.  I had to lay the fob down on the table, and use both hands to push down on the fob to get it to slowly close.  I thought that I was going to break the key fob!  The batteries in the fobs lasted about two years, so I guess I'll have to do this every two years.  Wasn't it better when you just had a metal key that you stuck in the ignition switched and turned it on?  No batteries, no fobs, just a mechanical switch that you turned on manually.

 

Oh, and just to mention...once I had the fob open, I could see the electronic components inside the fob....all $10 of them, and by claiming that they cost $10 is being generous.  So it makes you wonder why it costs $325 to get a new key fob?  I guess the explanation is called, "Rip-Off"!

 

Oh yes. Just because there is technology manufacturers have to use it whether or not it is more convenient and charge an arm and a leg to put it in and again when that technology fails.  I just bought a new washing machine. Every one that they had for sale had computer technology. I bought 1 with very little but it's still there.

 

My old machine had a few settings that had to be dialed in but it was no trouble to do it. One was wash temperature which I left on cold wash and rinse so no turning there. One was the size of load small medium large or super--no trouble there it only took a couple of seconds to set that. Then turn the main dial to the type of wash delicate to superwash and the number of minutes you want it to wash and pull it out to start the machine. All of which took less than 5 minutes to do.

 

My new machine is all automatic but you still have to set some dials  for water temperature and the type of load so what is the advantage of having a computer-- Nothing!! It maybe saves 2 seconds of your time. As I said it was there so they had to use it and charge more for doing it and if it breaks down it will cost an arm and a leg to fix. I do wish people would use common sense more when they are making things

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Hammer

Dowling, my washing machine is one of those older types that use mechanical switches...no computer garbage.  The reason that they use computerized machines is because it's cheaper to use computer chips, than it is to use mechanical switches.  My machine has no digital readout, and every switch on it clicks when you turn it....except the size of the load knob which is a mechanical potentiometer knob.  When I bought this machine, as well as my clothes dryer and my refrigerator, I specifically looked for those with no digital anything, as those can break down, and it costs a fortune to repair.  My old washing machine was also a non-digital machine, and when it stopped working, I Googled the problem, and found out the fix, and did the fix myself.  If it's a mechanical switch that's the problem, it is an easy fix, but if it's a computerized problem, the machine's computer's processor needs to be replaced, and they aren't cheap. 

 

That's why I hate today's cars touch screens.  The entire car requires you to use the touch screen to activate everything in the car....the air conditioning....the heating....the heated seats....the radio....the "Start/Stop" feature that nobody wants....etc., and if the touch screen breaks, the car is useless.  I have no idea what it would cost to replace the touch screen, but I'm sure that it's in the thousands of dollars....all for something that we don't want in the first place.

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buddy7

The way I see it, Hammer, I love technology, I just love all the bells and whistles on my appliances whatever they are, and you stated you ‘specifically looked for those with no digital anything’. When looking for household appliances today you’d be hard press to find anything without smart care digital technology, from your motor car to all household appliances, really I see this as a plus, not a hindrance. In that sense I have to agree with you, I have old non-digital mechanical knob settings washing machine for some 8-10 years, and to be frank with you, can’t wait to see the back of it, it served its time, and I can’t wait to upgrade to a computer digital read-out washing machine.

 

The way I see it, technology is the way forward, the more computer gadgetry, the better for me. I learn the hard way, paying out for kitchen appliances breakdowns in the past, so for some 14 years I took out a monthly premium insurance kitchen plan, if anything breaks down on my kitchen plan, I just call my insurance company for a repair of the broken appliance. There are times when the appliance is unrepairable, then the insurance company just replaces it. The truth be known, on my kitchen plan, I’ve had 2 ovens replaced, 2 dishwashers replaced, 3 washing machines replaced, and 4 fridge freezers replaced, most of the time where components (parts) have become obsolete/unavailable, so the appliance gets written off, and a new replacement is sent. And most of the time the new replacements they sent has computer gadgetry.

 

One of the things I noted in today's servicing of household appliances, service engineers do not mess about, most of the test the service engineer does when he comes to do a repair, most things that can go wrong feeds back to the computer printed circuit board, and what I see the service engineer does go back to his service van, takes out a new circuit board fits it to the appliance, gives it an overall working test to make sure all is ok, fault mended and he’s on his way. OK, I pay my monthly premiums for call-out 365 days per year, but I seldom get that reason to call a service engineer out. A catch-22 paradoxical situation, (you're) damned if you do and damned if you don't. But there's a time you can have 2-3 insurance call-outs per year, which in my view pays for the premiums. Why? Components (parts) are not cheap, one of the reasons I have insurance to cover breakdowns.

 

The way I see technology and its new computer gadgetry is the way forward, it’s changed, without change, things just stay dormant leaving no room for advancement, components (parts) etc. just becomes obsolete and harder to get manufactured, that’s why we’re living in a world of computer microchips and advance technology, this makes things much easier to manufacture and be repaired, to go along the old way, businesses will just collapse and close down. Components part and manufacturers around the Globe would totally go out of business, surely this doesn’t help the economy of any country.

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Hammer

Buddy, I have to respectfully disagree with you.  I don't know how old these appliances were, but you stated that you've had, "2 ovens replaced, 2 dishwashers replaced, 3 washing machines replaced, and 4 fridge freezers replaced".  I had my house built 43 years ago, and it came with a stove and refrigerator.  Once I moved in, I added a washer and a dryer.  In 43 years, I've only had to replace my refrigerator once and my washer once.  I still use the same old stove and dryer...in 43 YEARS!  Do you see how fragile and unreliable these newer appliances are?  My original washing machine and refrigerator lasted me for 22-25 years....how long did your computerized appliances last?  Heck, my parents had the really old style refrigerator that wasn't a frost free refrigerator, and they placed it down the basement when they got a new, frost free model, and that refrigerator in the basement was 50 years old and was still going strong. (we kept extra beer and sodas in it.)

 

To me, any appliance that has  a computer chip in it is garbage, and it will never last that long.  Heck, just look at today's computers....how long do they last before they need to  be replaced?...maybe 8-10 years?  If that's how long a computer's life is, how long do you think that a computerized appliance will last?  Do we really need toasters and refrigerators that are connected to the internet?....I don't think so, but if that's what you want, then more power to you, but just be ready to pay out lot's of money when they break down.

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Dowling
24 minutes ago, Hammer said:

I still use the same old stove and dryer...in 43 YEARS!  

 

I thought I was the only one with a dryer that old. My dryer is 46 years old  My husband bought it for me as a Mother's day present in1975. That may sound strange but I welcomed it more than flowers. I never did like cut flowers anyway--I'd much rather have a plant I can put in my flower bed.

 

Anyway to get back to the topic. We had bought our house in 1971 and being the kind of people we were it took a while to save for it. Meanwhile I used a basement clothesline in winter and an outside one as long as the weather was nice. The only repairs I've made to that drier was a new lint trap and a part on the door latch. Both of these I did myself after searching for parts on line. total cost less than $30

 

I cursed myself for bowing to the fashion and buying a green stove. I did buy a new white one to match my white fridge but it isn't half the stove my old one was. My husband took the green one apart to save the wires and it was just like new inside after 20 years

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buddy7
19 hours ago, Hammer said:

Buddy, I have to respectfully disagree with you.  I don't know how old these appliances were, but you stated that you've had, "2 ovens replaced, 2 dishwashers replaced, 3 washing machines replaced, and 4 fridge freezers replaced".  I had my house built 43 years ago, and it came with a stove and refrigerator.  Once I moved in, I added a washer and a dryer.  In 43 years, I've only had to replace my refrigerator once and my washer once.  I still use the same old stove and dryer...in 43 YEARS!  Do you see how fragile and unreliable these newer appliances are?  My original washing machine and refrigerator lasted me for 22-25 years....how long did your computerized appliances last?  Heck, my parents had the really old style refrigerator that wasn't a frost free refrigerator, and they placed it down the basement when they got a new, frost free model, and that refrigerator in the basement was 50 years old and was still going strong. (we kept extra beer and sodas in it.)

 

To me, any appliance that has  a computer chip in it is garbage, and it will never last that long.  Heck, just look at today's computers....how long do they last before they need to  be replaced?...maybe 8-10 years?  If that's how long a computer's life is, how long do you think that a computerized appliance will last?  Do we really need toasters and refrigerators that are connected to the internet?....I don't think so, but if that's what you want, then more power to you, but just be ready to pay out lot's of money when they break down.

I have no grief whatsoever with your disagreement with the facts I’ve explained in my recent post. And why should I? As you are aware, this is a forum and at some time/point we’re going to have our difference, or may it be on any conversation, I’m truly sorry we had to disagree on this topic.

 

I can appreciate the fragile rigidity of today household appliances, have to admit they don’t make them the way they use too. Years ago when I moved from London to the suburbs of Essex into a small 3 bedroom apartment which had little room to housed my family with my furniture and very few appliances, but saw this not a problem, knowing it was a short stay accommodation, within a year my 7 room house was on the horizon with the view once I moved in I had the opportunity to buy the property within a year I bought the house 1979. Structurally the house was very sound, but the people who moved out left the property internally shoddily kept, so I had my work cut out, all rooms had to be redecorated including the kitchen.

 

So having decorated all the rooms, had the old kitchen gutted, for a completely new kitchen, fitted with all new kitchen appliances, I kept my old washing machine which I still have, other than that I replace all the old kitchen appliances with new ones. That was in 2005, with all the fancy gadgetry with flashing lights and pre-set programs, but like all things they got old and some of them wore out with age, so they were replaced by my insurance kitchen plan when they cease to work.

 

Like to give you an example, also had my hot water boiler fitted around the same time, state of the art boiler technology, on the same kitchen plan, about 8 years ago my boiler stop working, called my insurance breakdown cover to have it mended, within 24 hrs the engineers came, one of the first time I had the chance to see what’s behind the face cover of the boiler, again all the fancy gadgetry flashing lights and different programs, and pressure gage, as the engineer got working, he told me most boilers have a fault finder, as it stop working on fault 2 he would then diagnose the fault from there, got his tools out plug it into the system, and the fault was on the printed circuit board, as I said before, went out to his van came back with a new printed circuit board fitted it, and the job was done, he then made a point, if you weren’t on insurance this call out would’ve cost you the earth to pay for, at the time a printed circuit board would have cost some £150 plus labour cost, and travelling to the site. The experience I learn from that, always have your appliances on breakdown coverage.

 

This is a throwaway world we live in, nothing is made the way they use too, thinly gage metal casing, loads of computer gadgetry and poorly made components. That’s why it took me 1 to 16 years to write off those appliances, admittedly I had them replaced, but have to say, nothing is made to last,  like the good old days. Hope this explains your disagreement or criticisms. And a point to make! “Do we really need toasters and refrigerators that are connected to the internet”? Not at all, heard of the new technology, which was way after my time setting up my kitchen plan.

 

Flashing lights, pre-set programming, and printed circuit boards. That’s more what I was into.

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Hammer

Buddy, I don't know if we have that type of insurance in my country, as I've never looked into it, but even if we did, I would never get it.  I don't have a boiler in my house, as my house has all electric baseboard heat, but I do have an electric water heater.  If the water heater breaks down, I will just replace it myself, as I've done in the past.  Pretty much anything that breaks down in my house, I will replace myself.  Heck, I've installed all of my storm windows, my water heater, most of my appliances, I've installed a finished family room in my basement, which consisted of installing wood studs along each wall, then adding insulation, then installing wood paneling, as well as installing the electric baseboard heat, and the new raised floor and the carpeting that is on the raised floor.  I've  installed the drop ceiling in the basement family room, and all of the lighting in the basement family room, as well as the workshop side of my basement.  I've installed the electric garage door opener in my garage, the floor tiles in my kitchen, dining room area, an attic exhaust fan to keep the house cool in the summer, bushes in front of my house, and along my driveway, trees for shade on my property, and the list goes on and on.  I prefer to do things the way that I want them to be done, which is why I've done all of these things myself.  I will admit that, now that I am older, it is getting more difficult to do as much as I want to do, since my body won't let me, but I will strive to do as much as I can, because, well, that's just me.  As a retired construction worker, I did everything by myself, because that's the way the construction trades taught me to do.😊

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Dowling
42 minutes ago, Hammer said:

Buddy, I don't know if we have that type of insurance in my country,

 Yes you do have a form of that insurance. It's called an extended warrantee for which you pay almost half of what the appliance is worth. In my opinion an extended warrantee is a way for the store to make money without giving anything concrete in return. They may spend money on 1 client but may have 5 more who will never use that warrantee. I never get that extended warrantee.

 

They offered it to me when I bought my washer. I paid $749 for my washer on sale. The extended warrantee that covered me for 4 years after the initial 1 year manufacturer's warrantee and it would have cost $249. My reasoning is if you get a lemon something will happen in that first year. If nothing goes wrong then it will outlast that extended warrantee

 

I wonder how much Buddy pays for his insurance and how long his appliances are covered from point of sale

Edited by Dowling

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Hammer

Dowling, I agree.  I have never bought an extended warranty.  Whenever I buy some appliance, and the sales person asks me if I want to buy the extended warranty, I always tell them no.  They then say, well what happens if the appliance breaks down?  I tell them, if that happens, I'll just buy another one, but it won't be by the same manufacturer.

 

I remember that,  many years ago, I needed to buy a new vacuum cleaner, since my old one died, and my brother was coming to visit for a week, and I needed a vacuum to clean up my house.  I went to a Sears store, and I bought a new vacuum cleaner, and the girl who was at the sales desk asked me if I wanted to buy an extended warranty, and I said no.  She asked me the same question....well what would I do if the vacuum broke down?  I told her that I was buying the vacuum to clean up my house for my brother's visit to my house.  After he left, I would never use the vacuum again, since I haven't vacuumed my house in many years, so why would I need an extended warranty for an appliance that I would never use again?  She didn't bother to keep asking me about an extended warranty again.  I still have that vacuum cleaner, and if I use it once every 6 months, that's a lot.  The only time that I vacuum or dust is when the dust balls are so big that I trip over them.😄

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buddy7
5 hours ago, Dowling said:

I wonder how much Buddy pays for his insurance and how long his appliances are covered from point of sale

My Insurance breakdown coverage is a conclusive Kitchen plan, means everything in the kitchen, at the moment I’m paying for 8 appliances @ a monthly premium of £68.60.

This works somewhat like an extended warranty, the difference is, at any time I can add to the policy for any further kitchen appliances, I so choose, and it doesn’t have to be brand new or recently purchased.

It’s like a forever insurance policy for kitchen appliances.

And for the 365 days per year, you have that coverage, if any one of your appliances breaks down, just call them, it’s a 24 hr service.

At the moment I have 2 fridge freezers, washing machine, dishwasher, electric oven, gas-hob, vent extractor and Hot water boiler. And may I add this policy is not for home contents, that’s completely different. Only a kitchen plan.

And if anything is deemed unrepairable ie obsolete parts or components or whereby the appliance is written off by the engineer, then my insurance company replaces the appliance without any further cost.

 

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Dowling
29 minutes ago, buddy7 said:

My Insurance breakdown coverage is a conclusive Kitchen plan, means everything in the kitchen, at the moment I’m paying for 8 appliances @ a monthly premium of £68.60.

This works somewhat like an extended warranty, the difference is, at any time I can add to the policy for any further kitchen appliances, I so choose, and it doesn’t have to be brand new or recently purchased.

It’s like a forever insurance policy for kitchen appliances.

And for the 365 days per year, you have that coverage, if any one of your appliances breaks down, just call them, it’s a 24 hr service.

At the moment I have 2 fridge freezers, washing machine, dishwasher, electric oven, gas-hob, vent extractor and Hot water boiler. And may I add this policy is not for home contents, that’s completely different. Only a kitchen plan.

And if anything is deemed unrepairable ie obsolete parts or components or whereby the appliance is written off by the engineer, then my insurance company replaces the appliance without any further cost.

 

So you pay $823.20 a year. That seems to me an awful lot. You could almost buy a new appliance a year for that and some would be cheaper than that. I guess mostly what you are paying for is peace of mind but it wouldn't be something I'd go for.

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buddy7
29 minutes ago, Dowling said:

So you pay $823.20 a year. That seems to me an awful lot. You could almost buy a new appliance a year for that and some would be cheaper than that. I guess mostly what you are paying for is peace of mind but it wouldn't be something I'd go for.

And you're quite right, just peace of mind. And you can never tell when you're going to get those costly repairs and try getting a service engineer in a 24hr breakdown services to come out, they'll charge you, an arm and leg, with no comeback guarantees, over here we call them (cowboys) So I'd stick to what I've got.

Thanks.

Edited by buddy7

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buddy7
9 hours ago, Hammer said:

Buddy, I don't know if we have that type of insurance in my country, as I've never looked into it, but even if we did, I would never get it.  I don't have a boiler in my house, as my house has all electric baseboard heat, but I do have an electric water heater.  If the water heater breaks down, I will just replace it myself, as I've done in the past.  Pretty much anything that breaks down in my house, I will replace myself.  Heck, I've installed all of my storm windows, my water heater, most of my appliances, I've installed a finished family room in my basement, which consisted of installing wood studs along each wall, then adding insulation, then installing wood paneling, as well as installing the electric baseboard heat, and the new raised floor and the carpeting that is on the raised floor.  I've  installed the drop ceiling in the basement family room, and all of the lighting in the basement family room, as well as the workshop side of my basement.  I've installed the electric garage door opener in my garage, the floor tiles in my kitchen, dining room area, an attic exhaust fan to keep the house cool in the summer, bushes in front of my house, and along my driveway, trees for shade on my property, and the list goes on and on.  I prefer to do things the way that I want them to be done, which is why I've done all of these things myself.  I will admit that, now that I am older, it is getting more difficult to do as much as I want to do, since my body won't let me, but I will strive to do as much as I can, because, well, that's just me.  As a retired construction worker, I did everything by myself, because that's the way the construction trades taught me to do.😊

Inspirational! An extraordinary effort, how do you really manage to do all those jobs around the house, did you at one time mentioned you had a back injury? absolutely amazing. I couldn't possibly do it, I'd have to call a contractor in, but of course, this is entirely against the grain for you.

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Hammer
9 hours ago, buddy7 said:

Inspirational! An extraordinary effort, how do you really manage to do all those jobs around the house, did you at one time mentioned you had a back injury? absolutely amazing. I couldn't possibly do it, I'd have to call a contractor in, but of course, this is entirely against the grain for you.

 Yes, I do have a bad back, but I did a lot of those jobs before I hurt my back.  I had this house built when I was 21, and I hurt my back when I was in my late 30's.  I still do some jobs around the house, and my back slows me down a lot, so I just have to sit every 5-10 minutes to let my back rest for 30 seconds, then I continue doing the job.  It takes a lot longer to do the job, but I have plenty of time, so there is no rush to get the job done.

 

I hurt my back doing deadlifts at the gym.  Deadlifts are where you stoop down, keeping your back as straight as possible, bending at the knees, grab a barbell, then stand up.  Once standing, you roll your arms back so that your chest is sticking out.  You then roll your arms forward, and set the weight down.  I was up to 345 lbs. (156 kg), which was a real strain for me, but when I hurt my back, I was just warming up with 175 lbs. (79 kg), when I felt a pain in my lower back.  I set the weight down, waited a minute, then tried to lift the weight again, but the pain came back, so I stopped lifting it.  It took three years before the pain became intense, and that's when I had an MRI done that indicated that I had a ruptured disk in my lower back.

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buddy7
18 hours ago, Hammer said:

I hurt my back doing deadlifts at the gym.  Deadlifts are where you stoop down, keeping your back as straight as possible, bending at the knees, grab a barbell, then stand up.  Once standing, you roll your arms back so that your chest is sticking out.  You then roll your arms forward, and set the weight down.  I was up to 345 lbs. (156 kg), which was a real strain for me, but when I hurt my back, I was just warming up with 175 lbs. (79 kg), when I felt a pain in my lower back.  I set the weight down, waited a minute, then tried to lift the weight again, but the pain came back, so I stopped lifting it.  It took three years before the pain became intense, and that's when I had an MRI done that indicated that I had a ruptured disk in my lower back.

As a young man at 17-18, I join a bodybuilding club, lots of reputations but lighter weights, I always wanted to look like Len Sell six-pack abs, large biceps and pic, huge calf muscles and thighs, where your back muscles stood out, lots of training but never stayed the distance, lost complete interest, when I began working in the construction industry early mornings and late evenings.

 

So I have some idea how you came about hurting yourself on the deadlift, 345 lbs is a lot of deadlift weight, especially if you weren’t wearing a belt at the time, why I said at the time, in those days the concept of wearing weight lifting belts seem, or wasn’t a necessity. I don’t know if you had the chance to see the television series, “World’s strongest man” The kind of TV program that grabs my attention, those heavyweights in these days always belt-up, I suppose the reason for that, they were far too many accidents in the past.

 

And getting back to your bad back “ruptured disk” have you ever considered having an operation? I’m sure with new technology some Orthopaedic Surgeons (specials) would be helpful. Or, you’ve lived with it for some time now, and it doesn’t matter anymore. For the deadlifts, look at those belts these guys are wearing these days.

 

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Hammer

Buddy,  I always wore a lifting belt when I lifted weights....that was how I was first taught to lift weights...wearing a belt.  While I didn't have huge muscles, the instructors at one of the gyms that I went to, would always want to measure you to see how much you progressed.  I wasn't into that, but that was their routine, so I went along with it.  At one time, I had a 56 inch (142 cm) chest, my biceps were 17.5 inches (44.4 cm), my neck was 18 inches (45.7 cm), and they couldn't measure my shoulders because their tape measure only went up to 72 inches (182.8 cm), and my shoulders were broader than that.  Remember, I'm 6'-2" tall (188 cm), and at that time, I weighed 200 lbs. (90.7 kg).  My avatar is a picture of me some 36 years ago, working out in the gym.  I don't look like that now, since I haven't been able to work out for many years, due to my bad back and my arthritis.

 

As to my back, well, when they found that I had a ruptured disk in my back, and when that started giving me intense pain, I went to a surgeon who did another MRI, and said that it would be beneficial if I had a partial disk removal, so I did, and that made a huge difference, but the surgeon told me that, the partial disk removal was only a  temporary fix, and that, years down the road, I'd need to have the rest of the disk removed, and then have the vertebrae fused, which is where I'm at now.  Years ago I went to a surgeon who does that procedure, and after taking a bunch of x-rays, told me that, unless I was in excruciating pain, that he does not recommend that I have the surgery because, he can't guarantee that the surgery will help, and in fact, the surgery could 

make it worse, because the back is a tricky thing, and even if they do everything right, the back might not come out as they expected.  

 

I figured, I could live with my back the way it is, but if they made it worse, I might not be able to live with that, so I didn't have the surgery.

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buddy7
17 hours ago, Hammer said:

Years ago I went to a surgeon who does that procedure, and after taking a bunch of x-rays, told me that, unless I was in excruciating pain, that he does not recommend that I have the surgery because, he can't guarantee that the surgery will help, and in fact, the surgery could 

make it worse, because the back is a tricky thing, and even if they do everything right, the back might not come out as they expected.  

 

I figured, I could live with my back the way it is, but if they made it worse, I might not be able to live with that, so I didn't have the surgery.

Hammer, one thing about Doctors/surgeons they hate committing their selves to any surgery, once there are not 100 % sure, they always leave that decision for you to take, so if by some chance things do go wrong, they are not to blame, it’s all down to their commitment and expertise, and because they are the professionals you need to start putting your trust in them.

 

A colleague of mine who had a touch and go situation like this, he had a torn heart muscle, after several months of toing and froing with the surgeon, the surgeon never wanted to commit himself to the heart procedure/operation, so the surgeon left it completely to the patient, my colleague. Just couldn’t see himself constantly out of breath on every move he made, may it be general walking of the dog or just getting up off the sofa, it was quite overbearing for him, so having spoken to his family, and he made to decision to go ahead with the operation. That was completely out of the surgeon's hands, halfway through the operation the surgeon lost control of the procedure, couldn’t stop the bleeding, and my poor colleague died in the theater on the operation table, imagine how the family felt, my colleague was only about 65. Saddens me, when Doctors/surgeons with their professionalism just can’t make their minds up, and leaves the commitment to the patient, and when something goes wrong they never take the blame anyway.

 

In your case, in my view that was the correct decision you made, if the surgeon was unsure and couldn’t guarantee that the surgery will help, then the decision had to be yours. Living with half of back that was bearable to live with, but a whole back made worse by an operation, how could you live with that? Probably kicking yourself for the rest of your life.

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Hammer

Buddy, I also have issues with chest pains and being out of breath.  If I stand up and walk to the next room, I get out of breath.  Anything that I do, causes me to get out of breath, and it's due to the fact that I have a small blood vessel that is 99% blocked.  There is nothing that they can do about this blood vessel, so I just have to live with it.  I asked the doctor, "what happens if that blood vessel gets to be 100% blocked?", and he said that I would have a heart attack.  He said that the heart attack wouldn't kill me, so I guess that I'm just sitting around, waiting to have a heart attack, since there is nothing that they can do to prevent it.  Isn't modern medicine wonderful?🙄

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Dowling
4 hours ago, Hammer said:

Buddy, I also have issues with chest pains and being out of breath.  If I stand up and walk to the next room, I get out of breath.  Anything that I do, causes me to get out of breath, and it's due to the fact that I have a small blood vessel that is 99% blocked.  There is nothing that they can do about this blood vessel, so I just have to live with it.  I asked the doctor, "what happens if that blood vessel gets to be 100% blocked?", and he said that I would have a heart attack.  He said that the heart attack wouldn't kill me, so I guess that I'm just sitting around, waiting to have a heart attack, since there is nothing that they can do to prevent it.  Isn't modern medicine wonderful?🙄

 

Hammer when did you get this diagnosis? If it was some time ago I check again. Perhaps make an appointment with the mayo clinic. They have new meds to unblock small blood vessels and maybe one could work for you. Medicine is changing all the time and new ways and meds are being developed. What might not have been done in the past can be done now. My BIL had a blood clot in his leg. In the past there would have been nothing they would do except put you on blood thinners. He was put on medications that dissolved the blood clot

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Hammer

Dowling, I had a cardiac catheter test done a year ago, and that's where they found that I had a small blood vessel that was 99% blocked.  The cardiologist that I saw, explained to me that the small blood vessel was too small to insert a stent in.  He also explained that the blood vessel was too small to do what I call a roto-rooter procedure that clears out the blood vessel, since that type of procedure would cut the blood vessel.  He also said that no one would recommend that they do a bypass on it, because the risk would far outweigh the benefits, the benefits being that I wouldn't get the chest pains.  What he did was to prescribe two more blood pressure medications that he said, would relieve the chest pains, but all the two medications did was to make the chest pains worse, and they made my ankles and feet swell up so much that I had trouble getting my shoes on, so I stopped taking them.  I no longer see a cardiologist, as I feel that it's a waste of time. ( I had seen two different cardiologists, and they both told me the same thing).

 

The way I look at things, being a very logical and unemotional person, is that, I'm 68 years old, my health is slowly going down the tubes, so if I have a heart attack, or any other serious problem, so be it.  I don't care anymore, so I just go about my life, doing what I've been doing, and if that results in me not waking up tomorrow, that's okay with me.  There comes a point in everyone's life where they realize that they are not going to live forever, and when that point comes, the person accepts it as just the cycle of life.  We're born, we live, and we die, and there is nothing that will ever change that.  An old joke...if I wake up tomorrow and read the newspaper's obituaries, if I don't see my name in there, then I'll make breakfast.😄

Edited by Hammer

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buddy7
12 hours ago, Hammer said:

The way I look at things, being a very logical and unemotional person, is that, I'm 68 years old, my health is slowly going down the tubes, so if I have a heart attack, or any other serious problem, so be it.  I don't care anymore, so I just go about my life, doing what I've been doing, and if that results in me not waking up tomorrow, that's okay with me.  There comes a point in everyone's life where they realize that they are not going to live forever, and when that point comes, the person accepts it as just the cycle of life.  We're born, we live, and we die, and there is nothing that will ever change that.  An old joke...if I wake up tomorrow and read the newspaper's obituaries, if I don't see my name in there, then I'll make breakfast.😄

Hammer, most of what you said so far in your post I could all but comprehend where you’re coming from, some years ago I had an older brother, he also had the same thoughts as you, and when I went to look for him for the last time, he said the same thing as you “I don't care anymore” can recall saying to him, why all the negativity? Why don’t you care anymore, and he went into the same kind of rhetoric, couldn’t seem to change his mind, one of the things I said to him, tell me a little about dying/death? Have you been there before? He said NO! So I said? Why you’re talking like this, so far you’ve had one beautiful life, and to me, it was a precious one, and you’ve done all the wonderful things you can possible do, as a younger brother we shared most of those happy times together, why are you talking like this today? I just ask him, stop talking like this? They must be a few things left in your life, you haven't done, please go out there and do them.

 

He had one growing-up daughter and grandchildren of whom he never met, two lovely homes, no debt that I know of, but what I knew, he had his cataracts removed and his sight was failing, he also mention glaucoma but to me those illnesses were treatable. As an older brother, I need not go on any further.

 

Months later he died of a heart condition. As an older brother, he was deeply missed by me.

 

<May I share your old joke> ‘if I wake up tomorrow and read the newspaper's obituaries if I don't see my name in there, then I'll make breakfast’. An old one, but cracks me up every time.

 

Leave this one with you:

"What we think determines what happens to us, so if we want to change our lives, we need to stretch our minds." 
 
 
 
 
Edited by buddy7

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Dowling
5 hours ago, buddy7 said:

What we think determines what happens to us, so if we want to change our lives, we need to stretch our minds." 

 I agree with you buddy. There is a book called "The Power of Positive Thinking" and I think everyone should read it Giving up and thinking negatively does effect your health. That is a known fact. Depression is usually the result of negative thinking.

 

My philosophy of life is Think positive, do what you can do and learn as much as you can and accept what you can't change in a positive way. Happiness depends on how you look at things and if you decide to be happy  you will be. I know that my mind can make a difference if I think of things the right way. Fate and destiny are words that have no place in my life. My life is what I make of it. I may have bumps in the road but they never get me down because I turn negatives into positives.

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Hammer

I also agree that how we think can affect our lives, and I have always been a positive person...never looking for the worst in life, I mean, when my wife left me for another man after 15 years of marriage, all because she didn't want me working on third shift, since that was the only job I could get, I wasn't depressed....I don't get depressed, because I am a realist, so I look at things logically.  She wanted to leave me, okay, there was nothing that I could do about that, so I just accepted it and moved on.  I wasn't upset about it, I just went on with my life.

 

The thing with my health is that, as more and more things happen to deteriorate your health, you begin to accept that life is getting less and less enjoyable.  Who wants to get up every day with pain in your back, your shoulders, and your knees, making it difficult to walk very far, as well as digestive issues that force you to change your lifestyle so that you are always near a bathroom?

 

I am still able to go to the food store and get groceries, but it's a struggle, due to my bad back, arthritis, and hoping that they have a bathroom in the store.  If it comes down to where I can no longer take care of myself, then what?  I will  NEVER be a burden to anyone, so if that time comes, then I will do what is necessary to NOT have that happen....that is the logical thing to do, and I am a very logical person.

 

I know that most people say that life is precious....I don't think that it is, I mean, what did your life cost to make?....nothing!  Life is life, whether it's a human being's life, a dog's life, or an insect's life, so no life is more important than any other living thing's life, so why put so much emphasis on human life, as opposed to any other forms of life?  

 

I'm sorry if these comments come across as being negative, they aren't meant to be negative, they are just my feelings as a realist...my very  logical  way of thinking.  When your body no longer functions in the way that you need it to to survive in a normal way, then it's time to do something about it.

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