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SadieKatie

Is Lisinopril really necessary?!

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ljjhouser
Reading thru the thread, I'm not sure how any of these comments benefit anyone.

 

I think responses here are in direct response to the questions and concerns of the orginal poster. Comments posted, factual or opinion, or simply for discussion, sometimes bring forward discovery of information for futher discussion or research to Forum Members, you included. It is easy to make assumptions that because one member may or may not know that no one will learn. But a new member or inactive member may not even know what lisinopril is. Or that he/she might want to discuss it with his/her doctor.

This is a Forum. Actually, I think a very good one due to the patience and understanding or most of its members. Later, Larry

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Geneva40

I use to take lisinopril for my blood pressure... i started having a cough that wouldnt go away.. it metabolizes in the lungs... my dr switched me to benicar which is not.

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HealthierMe

I take lisinopril. I was taking smaller and smaller doses because my blood pressure was going under 100/70. I wanted to stop taking it altogether. But the MD told me I need this medication for kidney protection.

 

I was surprised to see that other posters were prescribed 5 or 10 mg. My doctor gave me 20mg dose, which I don't take. I cut it in half. Still I've had blood pressure as low as 88/55. So I don't take it every day, which helps. Even after not taking it for 3 days my bp is normal 117/68. When I was in the emergency room 9 months and 50 pounds ago, I had high blood pressure, 160/110. I suffered a CVA. So I monitor my bp. I have to.

 

Low bp is a terrible thing to go through. I've told the doctor more than once that low bp affects my vision on standing.

I think it's a pretty terrible side affect to temporarily lose your vision! He told me this is because I should take it only at bedtime. So I started doing that. I can still have the problem on standing the following night, more than 12 hours after taking it.

 

The other side effect is that my urine is bright neon yellow.

 

That's my experience with lisinopril and I'm not offering anyone advice on medication. Just telling you what I'm going through. You do what's right for you. And I'll keep trying to figure out what's right for my health.

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yannah
I take lisinopril. I was taking smaller and smaller doses because my blood pressure was going under 100/70. I wanted to stop taking it altogether. But the MD told me I need this medication for kidney protection.

 

I was surprised to see that other posters were prescribed 5 or 10 mg. My doctor gave me 20mg dose, which I don't take. I cut it in half. Still I've had blood pressure as low as 88/55. So I don't take it every day, which helps. Even after not taking it for 3 days my bp is normal 117/68. When I was in the emergency room 9 months and 50 pounds ago, I had high blood pressure, 160/110. I suffered a CVA. So I monitor my bp. I have to.

 

Low bp is a terrible thing to go through. I've told the doctor more than once that low bp affects my vision on standing.

I think it's a pretty terrible side affect to temporarily lose your vision! He told me this is because I should take it only at bedtime. So I started doing that. I can still have the problem on standing the following night, more than 12 hours after taking it.

 

The other side effect is that my urine is bright neon yellow.

 

That's my experience with lisinopril and I'm not offering anyone advice on medication. Just telling you what I'm going through. You do what's right for you. And I'll keep trying to figure out what's right for my health.

 

just food for thought, my pcp told me if I don't take it as prescribed - everyday - same time. ... it could hurt me, make things worse, more than help me.

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jkane13

Same boat for me. On diagnosis, I was given a prescription for 5 mg of lisinopril. Plus some small dose of simvastatin, asprin, and of course metaformin. I only took the met as it made sense. I have never had high blood pressure nor high cholesterol. I wainted a couple months and did a lot of research reading every thing I could on simvastatin and lisinopril. I had my BP checked daily by the nurse at work. Then I started taking the simvastatin first for a month. Finally about 4 months in, I decided to try the lisinopril. I have no problems with it, and I think it did lower my BP , but not below acceptable.

 

Why did my doc convince me to take it? Because there is some research that says it might help. The small does seems to be not harmful. And ... my mother dies from kidney failure and all the other things that go with diabetes. Plus, my father in his 70's finally had his first heart attack. Oh yeah, my Mom had 5 bypasses before she finally died under 60 years old.

 

So, I said I would try the preventative route.

 

You have to decide for your self if that's the right thing for you.

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Real4
Sorry to hijack your thread Sadie but it really bothers me that people on here offer up advice about medications. A reader uneducated about these things might decide to stop his/her blood pressure medication because he read in here that it was bad medicine. The forum administrators will boot you off from here if a reader is offended by a weight comment but allow all types of medical advice to go thru here. Personally, I'm offended by it.

 

It is far more dangerous to believe in "experts" of any type without justification. Of course, it is possible to be stupid about medications because you do not take what is said critically, but that is true in all areas of life and will be until we are all in paradise.

 

I do not know the truth about the claim that ACE inhibitors add an extra layer of protection beyond their effect on BP. I take an ACE inhibitor, but I also do have BP problems, so it is not an issue for me.

 

Were I in the position of the original poster, I would do exactly the same - try and find out what the truth is.

 

"Believe the doctor" is for fools. Which doctor? The establishment ones. Well, the experience of this forum, in general, is that the medical establishment has (and is) very wrong on many diabetes related topics.

 

For example, the AMA and the ADA prescribe diets that are carbohydrate rich and almost impossible to follow while having good glucose control. The AMA was against glucose meter use by anyone, for years, because it was their professional opinion that we are all are too stupid to make use of the information without professional help. Most of those establishment medical professionals actually need moral help.

 

Now there is a push by insurance companies and accountant-run government cost-control boards to eliminate or cut back on, meter use for types 2s.

 

These experts will soon be in the wastebasket of history, and it's none too soon. It is to us, collectively and individually, that will determine if they go alone or drag humanity down with them.

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MMJ

This is utterly ridiculous-

 

It is far more dangerous to believe in "experts" of any type without justification. Of course, it is possible to be stupid about medications because you do not take what is said critically, but that is true in all areas of life and will be until we are all in paradise.

 

I do not know the truth about the claim that ACE inhibitors add an extra layer of protection beyond their effect on BP. I take an ACE inhibitor, but I also do have BP problems, so it is not an issue for me.

 

Were I in the position of the original poster, I would do exactly the same - try and find out what the truth is.

 

"Believe the doctor" is for fools. Which doctor? The establishment ones. Well, the experience of this forum, in general, is that the medical establishment has (and is) very wrong on many diabetes related topics.

 

For example, the AMA and the ADA prescribe diets that are carbohydrate rich and almost impossible to follow while having good glucose control. The AMA was against glucose meter use by anyone, for years, because it was their professional opinion that we are all are too stupid to make use of the information without professional help. Most of those establishment medical professionals actually need moral help.

 

Now there is a push by insurance companies and accountant-run government cost-control boards to eliminate or cut back on, meter use for types 2s.

 

These experts will soon be in the wastebasket of history, and it's none too soon. It is to us, collectively and individually, that will determine if they go alone or drag humanity down with them.

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foxl

I am finding it ironic that many of the posters are offering support (in the form of supporting information) FOR the doctors' recommendations, yet someone finds it unethical of us, to do so ...

 

And further, this is in support of a generic medication, and at no profit to the people supplying the info.

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hannajo
A family member of mine has had diabetes for 2 years (type one). One of his doctors wants to place him on Lisinopril, 5 mg for "kidney protection" in spite of his BP being normal, always systolic 100-120, diastolic 60-80. His diet and exercise habits are also great; he controls his BG levels very well on insulin injections and would like to avoid unnecessary meds.

My question is this, how does an ace inhibitor like Lisinopril protect your kidneys if your blood pressure is already fine? From what I understand, all an ace inhibitor really does to lower your BP, and it's the high blood pressure that will damage your kidneys. If you don't have high blood pressure, why take the drug, and suffer unneeded side effects? Does it have some magical effects other than lowering your blood pressure that will help prevent kidney failure in the future?

 

I am not against medications in general. They are certainly life-savers for the right people. And of course I want what's best for my loved one. I don't want him to have compromised kidney function later in life when he could have prevented it. However I am aware of the negatives involved with regular medication use, and the possibility that, over time, drugs can actually damage the organs that they are trying to help.

 

I really need some reasonable and thorough thoughts about this. I am really tired of hearing "it's to protect your kidneys" from drug-pushing docs without a good scientific explanation why.

 

If drugs are the answer, are there "kidney protectors" with fewer negative health effects than Lisinopril?

 

I am new to this forum; thank you so much for your answers, I really appreciate it.

 

SadieKatie I was recently diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes and my blood pressure was leaning to hypertension (120's &130's/90's). my doctor prescribed 10mg lisinopril. She told me that even when my blood pressure lowered, I would still need to take lisinopril forever to protect my kidneys. Well, months later, I have lost 35lbs. and my blood pressure is under control. So, I was left with the question of whether to continue with lisinopril. After researching, I found that perhaps there is a valid reason to continue lisinopril. People with Type 2 Diabetes sometimes have an increase of albumin in their urine (microalbuminuria). Microalbuminuria is linked to kidney disease and kidney failure. ACE Inhibitors, like lisinoprol aid in preventing buildup of albumin. So, as it may not be prescribed for high blood pressure, lisinopril may be prescribed for its properties to lower the albumin levels. This information has certainly helped me to decide to continue to take it. I'm not quite sure if this is the same case for Type 1 Diabetics, as with your loved-one, but it is certainly worth researching. I hope you find your answer.

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AdamDanger
This is utterly ridiculous-

 

MMJ, how can state in other posts that you threw out your Byetta, think medicinal marijuana is good, and then get onto someone for giving feedback on medication?

 

I for one have been advised to take lisinopril for "preventative measures" from my endo and before I make a choice, would like to hear experiences and concerns from others.

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undefined

Just my thoughts -

 

I like hearing what's going on with other people. Every time I read what's going on with someone on this forum, it makes me think about my own care and what I can be doing better/change/ask my doctors about. The more education I have, the better I can work with the people who write the notes for the meds.

 

I guess in defense of my own medical team, I have to point out that there seems to be a tendency on these boards to feel that doctors are all a bunch of drug pushers. Maybe I am the unique one, but my doctors don't put me on medications that they don't think I need just because they "should". For example, I am NOT on met and I am not on any cholestrol meds even though when I was DX they were a bit high (they have since come down). Specific to this thread, I've been on lisinopril for high BP for a couple of years (prior to dx) and while my dr wants to keep me on it, she did mention changing the doses, etc, because my numbers are coming down.

 

Don't get me wrong, I don't think that Dr's know everything by any means. And we know more about what's working for us than they do - we live with it every day, after all. On the other side, we aren't using a good tool in our tool box if we disregard what they say. In the end, it's your own decision - nobody can MAKE you take that pill. I think we all agree that our goal is to make sure that we have the best chance of the least complications down the road.

 

And for the last bit in this huge post (sorry for words words), I think that we would be well served to remember that people on this forum are much more educated and involved in our own care than the average diabetic. We all know people who are diabetic and take their pill and get their A1C every 3 months and that's the end for them. Doctors are used to working with those people and have to assume that we will also be bumblers that won't follow the "directions" we've been given.

 

I'm not a doctor, but mine have saved my life and listen to me when I talk about my care, and I guess I'd just like to see a little benefit of the doubt that they are working on our behalf the best way they know how.

 

(hey, the site kept telling me to post! So I did. ;)

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sarahspins

I am on 5mg of Lisinopril for renal protection.. I don't have high BP (was about 120/70 before, and that's still where I am). I looked into it, and decided the potential benefits were worth it, and I actually asked my doctor to put me on it. She did so without hesitation.. and agreed it was a good idea.

 

I've had T1 for almost 10 years and while I have no problems with my kidney function and I'm in good control, I still worry. I know the ACE inhibitor isn't a guarantee but if it's something else I can do to improve my odds, I'm all for it.

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laser
I'm on it for kidney protection as well, 5mg. It's not dangerous and it definitely has been studied to help.

 

I researched it too when I was put on it, I wouldn't worry too much.:)

 

I'm trying to get into the 6 category with myA1c. I've recently, been hovering around a 7.2 and really getting frustrated.:confused::( I want to join the 6 club. I'm testing up to 15 x's /day. Aside from my morning spike, all appears within the 70 - 160 range. What have you done that helps?:D

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HeartMan

I find sharing experiences with medications very helpful on this forum. One should always check with their doctors, but not all doctors are created equally. We are our best advocates. Of course no one should change medical regimen because of something read here, read somewhere else, heard from a friend or other patient, or seen on TV. But all of those avenues can be good sources to generate questions to ask our doctors.

 

I'm coming up on my 25th anniversary from my first heart transplant. Over the past few years I've experienced a decline in the patient experience at my transplant center. This year I scheduled my annual exams at another medical institution.

When I got back I wrote two memos: one concerning hospital policies which I sent to the nursing officers, the other concerning medical protocols which I sent to one of my doctors.

 

The physician wrote me back and addressed each of my comments separately. In short, I will probably have one of my meds discontinued because of the second opinion and two other medications will be brought up for review to the entire team.

 

As to lisinopril, my kidney transplant docs like the fact that I'm on lisinopril. The docs at the medical center I had my recent tests done were also pleased that I was on lisinopril, specifically because of the protection it offers my kidney. There are some side effects to it, but I don't have any of those. My wife was put on it for high blood pressure, but she developed a cough. Her doc put her on a med in a different class, and it works fine.

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