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hardingnerd

Lack of Appetite

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hardingnerd

So I am on this new medication for narcolespy and it's causing a severe lack of appetite. I need the meds and have helped a lot already but I am finding it hard to make myself eat...

 

Any suggestions?

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foxl

Aw, Cheyenne.

 

No ideas -- but maybe your prescriber could suggest something? What is the medication? I know Ritalin is sometimes used for narcolepsy. If so, you will adjust to it over time and your sense of hunger will return.

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fgummett

What do you like to eat? Make sure you have a supply on hand of rich and tasty [low-carb] foods... indulge in nuts, dark-chocolate, full-fat cheeses, heavy cream with berries... :eating:

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foxl

Aha.

 

I can tell you what worked for my son while he was adjusting then (he's 7 and on Vyvanse):

 

Eat extra food (not carbs obviously :cool: ), before the meds kick in, and also late at night after they wear off.

 

It can give you dry mouth, so eat moister foods during the middle of the day. Outside of that, hang tight -- appetite does improve. Good luck. A fine combination of things there ...

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hardingnerd

Glad to hear that my appeitie will improve. Linda does your son havd ADD or ADHD? Just curious.

 

Man this is tough but without the meds I sleep 17+ hours and have EDS. :(

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foxl
Glad to hear that my appeitie will improve. Linda does your son havd ADD or ADHD? Just curious.

 

Man this is tough but without the meds I sleep 17+ hours and have EDS. :(

 

URGH -- yes, you need the meds to keep awake!

 

There is no ADD designation anymore, technically, they call it inattentive-type ADHD. Oddly, my boy seems okay, that way (but they say it is more apparent with age).

 

Sam has mixed-type ADHD, but his most challenging symptom (to put it kindly) was an utter lack of impulse control! I lived with him unmedicated from ages 2 - 5.5 (we adopted him at 2) and I could not trust him for one minute. My back would be turned, and he would be doing something destructive or dangerous. (His first day at our home, he gravitated to a bottle of liquid Claritin and drank it. Poured half down his chest! Poison Control had to talk me down!).

 

And he is the SWEETEST, most generous, kindest guy. He has very poor fine motor coordination, still (typical), and is slow learning to read, but otherwise, he is the best storyteller I have ever met, just incredibly imaginative, and we are all confident that he is quite bright.

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hardingnerd

Awe he sounds like a sweetie. Eh I don't care about medical terms, people know what ADD is... and I think it's better than saying inatt.... excatly.

 

I think it's interesting how some people don't get an ADD/ADHD diagnosis till college like myself and a few of my friends. I guess it was still kind of new and if you didn't have the hyperactive part it didn't exist.

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foxl

Yeah, I do know my daughter's teacher last year got a dx at 40! I do not know if she was coping all those years, and just found out, or if it was new. I suspect if you do not have disruptive behaviors (and often females do not), you can "get away" being ADD for ages!

 

Girls are overall more sociable and cooperative (seriousyl!) so tend to be more effective at inhibiting the disruptive impulses. I know in Autism Spectrum Disorder, some people believe the 5:1 ratio of boys to girls is utterly false ... and MY girl is also barely manifesting behaviors that are typical. At SCHOOL. At home ... stink-o. We see it all. She SAVES it up for us! :T

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Nerak

Hi Linda,

I have 3 boys that are adopted as well. I am glad it worked out and your son is ok but I had to chuckle at the liquid claritin story. I have many similar stories and sometimes you just have to laugh, at least after the fact anyway.

 

-Karen

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foxl
Hi Linda,

I have 3 boys that are adopted as well. I am glad it worked out and your son is ok but I had to chuckle at the liquid claritin story. I have many similar stories and sometimes you just have to laugh, at least after the fact anyway.

 

-Karen

 

Karen, yup! It took a while before I could laugh, though. You have 3 boys? Wow! I was astounded to learn 30% of adopted boys have ADHD -- and no one is quite sure if it is real, or because the adoptive parents are more attentive than typical ... (I suspect it is "real," either inherited or due to some early environmental factor).

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Nerak

My 9 year old (3 when he came home) has an alphabet soup of diagnosis. My boys were adopted from our wonderful(not) foster care system. So, between genetics, what the birthmoms did to their bodies while pregnant, and what the system did to them after the fact there are a lot of elements at work. Anyway, they are beautiful boys and we are lucky to have them. Sorry for hijacking the thread.

 

-K

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foxl

Yep I think I have hijacked it ... sorry, Cheyenne -- and I hope you are hungry, this morning??? :D

 

Karen, of my 3, I have one ASD diagnosis, and one ADHD. Mine are internationals -- and from 3 different countries. I am very interested in the oxytocin hypothesis and research -- I think it might explain the excess of ASD and ADHD cases, in adopted kids -- no initial (and I do not mean at birth) bonding leads to a deficit.

 

Back on topic ...

 

My 9 year old (3 when he came home) has an alphabet soup of diagnosis. My boys were adopted from our wonderful(not) foster care system. So, between genetics, what the birthmoms did to their bodies while pregnant, and what the system did to them after the fact there are a lot of elements at work. Anyway, they are beautiful boys and we are lucky to have them. Sorry for hijacking the thread.

 

-K

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hardingnerd

I seem to be able to eat more in the morning because they haven't taken affect yet but it's still minimal compared to what I normally ate.

 

BTW I am a Social Work major and for your friend who got Dx at forty the likely hood of getting suddenly is like zero to none. However, sometimes extreme stress can make it more visible, for me I know it became easier to see in college when the stress of harder work came along.

 

For the boys I think a lot of it could be the enviroment for their to be such a high percentage with ADHD. Which is sad. :(

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foxl
I seem to be able to eat more in the morning because they haven't taken affect yet but it's still minimal compared to what I normally ate.

 

BTW I am a Social Work major and for your friend who got Dx at forty the likely hood of getting suddenly is like zero to none. However, sometimes extreme stress can make it more visible, for me I know it became easier to see in college when the stress of harder work came along.

 

For the boys I think a lot of it could be the enviroment for their to be such a high percentage with ADHD. Which is sad. :(

 

 

Glad you are eating more, but hope it improves too!

 

What do you mean by environment -- social environment as in neglect? I dunno ... but I suspect with my son he will medicated lifelong.

 

As to the teacher, I KNOW she was under tremendous stress -- was having anxiety attacks, etc. AND had new teenagers in her household ... :cool:

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hardingnerd

Environmental like how they were raised before they/he came into your household kind of thing. It can be genetic of course but the environment can defently play a role.

 

Sorry lots of typos.

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foxl
Environmental like how they were raised before they/he came into your household kind of thing. It can be genetic of course but the environment can defently play a role.

 

Sorry lots of typos.

 

Okay so that DOES play back into the oxytocin theory ...

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foxl
Environmental like how they were raised before they/he came into your household kind of thing. It can be genetic of course but the environment can defently play a role.

 

Sorry lots of typos.

 

Okay so that DOES play back into the oxytocin theory ...

 

Hard for me to imagine Sam as being raised before age 2 ...

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jkane13

On the serious side though ... ADHD distractions aside ... when a majority of male early teen boys are "diagnosed" with a medical condition, maybe it's not a condition at all, but is what we are supposed to be, and the real problem is the adults not willing to deal with it like we used to!

 

It's is a social issue where tolerance is not what it used to be, and instead, the neurotypical of the world have this dream world they live in where everyone acts identical and a little weirdness or inattentiveness is not allowed.

 

That answer to this is what it was when I was a kid. Tell us to sit down and shut up! Then make it happen, don't ask twice! Don't run and hide in the corner and claim the kid is the problem when the real problem is the adult who doesn't want to take the responsibility for taking care of or educating that child.

 

When it can't be avoided, then deal with it! Give that child a bit more time to learn. There is nothing wrong with separate classes for those with slightly different learning styles and speeds. What is wrong is forcing those who could have gotten a good education to keep up with the rest and falsely pass them on to make your numbers of success look good.

 

Even worse, is to drug them during their most formative years! This is the time when their brains are learning the coping skills they will need to deal with ADHD for the rest of their lives. If you drug them now, they haven't got a chance in **** for the next 40 years. Once they are an adult, and if it is still a problem, then let them make that choice on their own to take stimulants or not.

 

I had 2 ADHD diagnosed kids. Neither needed drugs to survive. It was because the teachers were too lazy to deal with giving some kids a little more attention than the perfect little angels in the school needed.

 

Sorry, you all hit a nerve on this topic!

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foxl

Jeff, as far as hitting a nerve, so did you.

 

My kid seriously SERIOUSLY needs his meds. And I know others -- including adults -- who do, too!

 

I think my son might have benefitted from even earlier use of meds -- like from age 2 or 3. I certainly did not put him on them to enable teachers to deal with him -- I put him on them to enable HIM to cope with the world he lives and will live in.

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hardingnerd

I agree with Linda...

Being ADHD minus the hyperactive part.

 

It's not laziness or anything but there is a disconnect in the brain that causes focusing issues. Some can cope as I did through school, but it requierd a lot more hard work is very difficult at times.

 

The meds for Narcolepsy I am taking also help with ADHD and I can tell a huge difference in both.

 

So Jeff it's probably not best to group people up because not everybody is like your sons.

 

Just saying.

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