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juan_perez

Tell me about how you control without meds.

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juan_perez

Are you controlling your diabetes without meds? Can you share your stories with me? How long have you done that? What do yo do?

 

Thanks in advance.

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jps

I'll try and keep my story short, though it never seems to end up that way.

 

Diagnosed in August 08 with a FBS around 300 and A1c around 10.5. Placed on insulin (Lantus). Went low carb (less than 60 grams per day), added exercise. Even though I allowed up to 60 grams of carb per day, they were not any grains... no bread, no cereal, no rice, no pasta, etc. And no potatoes. No fruits in the beginning. So the carbs basically came in the form of most, but not all, vegetables. With all that I shed weight quickly and in a healthful manner.

 

After the initial carb withdrawal problems, I had more energy. It made exercise easier and more frequent. That really increased the weight loss. My sugars quickly normalized with the insulin. As I lost more weight, I had to cut back on the insulin otherwise I would have gone into hypos. This cascade kept occurring until I was off insulin 6 months after diagnosis. I have been off insulin since January '09. And I've been able to add some carbs back into my diet, specifically fruits and I will have the occasional piece of bread. And it's not having a negative impact on my A1c's....

 

It takes a complete mental overhaul to do this IMO. There is no half-way. It's a commitment - and a lifetime commitment at that.

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raffi

After DX, I took Metformin for 3 months and starting learning a bit about diet. I was following a ADA type diet (though actually slightly higher in carbs) given me by the D nutrition class. With the help of the met, my numbers and weight came down and being the cocky sort of person I am, I stopped taking the met figuring I had this thing licked.

 

Well, turns out the met was doing something, so I then started paying more attention to diet and learning a bit of how to best control things. I cut my carb intake to no more than 120g per day (often a lot less) and all but the smallest portion of them being veggies. I continued to loose weight and got the BG numbers to settle again. So far, I've been off meds since the end of October. I have been able to bring a few carbs back in, I still keep it to 120g or less, but I will have the occasional whole wheat (we grind the wheat ourselves) toast or pita bread.

 

Calorie reduction, weight loss and lately a lot of exercise. The exercise came from feeling better with more energy, not because I was using it to bring the BG down, though it certainly does help with the control.

 

My original success with an ADA type diet says more about how bad my pre DX diet was rather than how good of an idea that diet was.

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Evermont

Dx T2 9/11/07 with A1c 8.8 Decided to start with diet and exercise rather than meds.

 

I eat to my meter. Nothing is "off limits" but I'm rather consistent in avoiding foods that make my meter mad. Almost no bread of any kind. Almost no potatoes. Almost no rice. Almost no pasta. When I do eat those things - I know which ones work for me, and why, and what quantities, and how best to prepare them. I think fresh fruits and veggies are important but I keep tropical stuff to a minimum - I have a high latitude attitude. I lean toward a Mediterranean diet. Food is fuel - I choose foods based on nutrition not taste, then I make those taste as good as I can. And I can indeed. Fasting is always an option for me, so convenience is never a good excuse for poor choices. Variety is nutritionally important, and happily a personal preference too.

 

As if this all weren't enough of a challenge, I've been lacto-ovo vegetarian since '86 - so no meat (by choice). I make it work. It's not that "carbs are bad", rather "bad carbs are bad". Bad carbs are fast. The fact that bad carbs are also often cheap, convenient, and tasty is an uninteresting fact to me. It helps to understand Glycemic Index and Load. I can't be bothered to count carbs, or measure or weigh food. I read few nutrition labels because food that comes with nutrition labels is usually something I've already decided not to eat. Not to mention that the labels are often misleading or outright lies. A clove of garlic is mostly carbs I think - but don't really care.

 

I enjoy doing things that require my body to work hard. My favorite activities are things that make me sweat and breathe hard. My job is sit-all-day so I have to compensate for that anyway. Fortunately, I like living an active lifestyle. For a lot of people exercise means counting countless hours on a hamster wheel of some sort. Here again I think variety is important - it helps to have both short and long term motivations.

 

Diet and exercise aren't the only knobs I can tweak. I have 15 more pounds to lose. I can improve my sleep hygiene. I can prevent or manage stress better. Etc.

 

My most recent A1c is 6.0. the range has been 5.7 to 6.5 in the 3 years since Dx. Someday my D will progress enough to warrant meds of some sort. I may skip oral meds and go straight to insulin.

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rak1978
Fasting is always an option for me, so convenience is never a good excuse for poor choices.

 

Great quote! I want to hang that up on my cupboard! :)

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juan_perez

Im asking because I want to know how you do it, and because I have a friend with a sister that has managed her diabetes whitout meds for 25 years (and she has no signs of her diabetes getting worse). So maybe there is hope for everyone.

 

Hugs!!!

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rak1978
Im asking because I want to know how you do it, and because I have a friend with a sister that has managed her diabetes whitout meds for 25 years (and she has no signs of her diabetes getting worse). So maybe there is hope for everyone.

 

Hugs!!!

 

That's great that she's been able to do that! And it is probably motivating to many people who wish to avoid meds. Unfortunately, there is not hope for everyone to get off of meds. If I go off of insulin, I die. And this is the case for a lot of us. Sad, but true.

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fgummett

As Rachel says and not trying to be disheartening but realistically just because some can manage without meds does not means that all of us can... Type 1 especially but Type 2 as well. In my own case by losing weight and changing my diet, I have managed to reduce my medication to a minimum but if I skip it (Levemir) altogether my BGs will get too high for my comfort or long-term health.

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juan_perez

Oh sure, I understand that. But we should do as much as we can. This girl (the one who has managed her diabetes for 25 years) is doing a lot of things, but her primary changes are in diet, a very strict diet.

 

Of course, each body is different. But there is hope. Never give up, there is hope. Do everything you can.

 

And I understand Type 1 can't do it, I perfectly understand the difference. I was talking about Type 2. Sorry if I was not clear.

 

And please, keep the stories coming!!!

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rak1978
Oh sure, I understand that. But we should do as much as we can. This girl (the one who has managed her diabetes for 25 years) is doing a lot of things, but her primary changes are in diet, a very strict diet.

 

Of course, each body is different. But there is hope. Never give up, there is hope. Do everything you can.

 

And I understand Type 1 can't do it, I perfectly understand the difference. I was talking about Type 2. Sorry if I was not clear.

 

And please, keep the stories coming!!!

 

Juan: Please forgive me if I'm being negative. I'm trying to be honest and realistic. I've just come out of my "denial" phase, and I have to accept the fact that I will be on meds (insulin and metformin) for the rest of my life. Unless someone comes along with a cure....THAT, I can hope for.

I just saw that you added the note about talking to Type 2's.

That's my queue. Carry on! :)

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fgummett

And to re-iterate that I am a Type 2 and with strict (although rich and tasty) diet and significant weight loss (100lbs) I have been able to cut my daily insulin injections from around 130u down to 12u... I had hoped that I might be off medications altogether but that seems less likely with each passing day. Perhaps if I had been diagnosed and/or found out about low-carb/high-fat diet sooner. Sometimes practicality has to step over wishful thinking :)

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bardley

...what worked for me was Diet, Exercise, and Weight control (DEW). The ADA website, and a friend who has had Type I for a long time, were also a foundation to build from.

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foxl

There is a guy on Facebook, Steve Cooksey, who bills himself as a "Diabetes Warrior."

 

He was diagnosed, like me, in DKA. He works out a LOT, has lost a lot of weight, is somewhere around age 50, and eats a Paleo diet.

 

I do not eat paleo and do not work out as intensively, but I DO follow him. If you are on FB, look him up! He also has a blog, you might google him!

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MCS

Short as possible:

 

Dxed after eating nothing but eggs and slim jims for a week at 350 BG level. Put on MET, BP meds. Stopped taking MET after 1.5 mnths. Changed my Diet, started taking herbals and supps. Had a quad-by pass done last Thanksgiving. A1C was down to 4.8 at the time.

 

I now can exercise more than before and have been in the sub 80's FBG for the past several days. I eat what ever my meter says I can eat.

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MCS

I forgot to add that I had to inject insulin a time or two since being Dxed, but haven't for the past several months.

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abanynini
I'll try and keep my story short, though it never seems to end up that way.

 

Diagnosed in August 08 with a FBS around 300 and A1c around 10.5. Placed on insulin (Lantus). Went low carb (less than 60 grams per day), added exercise. Even though I allowed up to 60 grams of carb per day, they were not any grains... no bread, no cereal, no rice, no pasta, etc. And no potatoes. No fruits in the beginning. So the carbs basically came in the form of most, but not all, vegetables. With all that I shed weight quickly and in a healthful manner.

 

After the initial carb withdrawal problems, I had more energy. It made exercise easier and more frequent. That really increased the weight loss. My sugars quickly normalized with the insulin. As I lost more weight, I had to cut back on the insulin otherwise I would have gone into hypos. This cascade kept occurring until I was off insulin 6 months after diagnosis. I have been off insulin since January '09. And I've been able to add some carbs back into my diet, specifically fruits and I will have the occasional piece of bread. And it's not having a negative impact on my A1c's....

 

It takes a complete mental overhaul to do this IMO. There is no half-way. It's a commitment - and a lifetime commitment at that.

 

This really impressed me as a way to take on this disease and really make that commitment to living better, more healthy. I'd like to hear how that continues to go for that person, and as well to any others that are taking that approach. I'd like to think that our health insurance might take into account an aggressive lifestyle approach like that when coming up with our premiums!

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magiclouie2

I was diagnosed last December 14, 2012. I was down but not anymore.

 

I am exercising everyday. I bought a basketball and just keep dribbling.

 

Praying every moment is the best cure.

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clebo

What I do is much like everyone else that has reduce thier meds. or med free.Its a strick diet and after I eat a 15 carb meal I walk for 20- 30 mins.Glad to hear from you.

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MCS

Like some one has stated it is a complete mind set change. You have to learn how to enjoy things you never thought you would before being Dxed. My BG level is between 65-85 on most days, seldom ever see anything over 90. I have been in ketosis for over a year now and plan to keep it this way for some time to come.

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apollo322

For me what worked so far is a low carb diet ( typically les than 50 g a day but i don't measure it) and between 45 -90 minutes of some exercise per day. I try to break it up into two separate workouts at morning and in the evening. Thanks for sharing the sister who has controlled with diet for 25 years, that's quite an inspiration!

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bardley

...this is the first time that I've heard of someone managing their diabetes (w/o meds) for some 25 years. That's truly amazing and an inspiration to all of us. To answer your question, someone on this website coined the phrase DEW and it has worked [so far] for me and many others. However, be careful as not everyone is starting in the same place and may not have the same options. For instance, some may already have diabetic related damage to the feet, eyes, and so on. Likewise, my lipids are normal and well within tolerance. I also run half marathons and/or 10km runs almost weekly, but do check my BS daily. At the end of the day, my non-fasting count is usuaully somewhere between 70-95'ish. I also check my own A1C using a take home kit and have found it to me accurate in my case. I eat only a certain range of foods and never, ever bread, rice, or potatoes. I eat eggs twice a week, meat almost every day, fish (when I can), and generous amounts of veggies (but not carrots). My one downfall is a couple beers/night but that's my decision. A piece of good news is that natural supplements seem to work for some people. The two favorites appear to be cinammon and bitter melon. There are those who swear by them and others who say it doesn't do anything for them. With diabetes, there are probably no standard solutions so see what works for you and as someone said 'eat to your meter'. Good luck and perhaps someone should start a thread reference the longest time managing type 2 diabetes w/o meds. I'd be curious to see the comebacks and I'm heading towards 3 years now.

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gabrielo

Today, I got my latest blood test result from the doctor, an A1C of 5.8. I honestly didn't think I would ever be below 6 again as the last few years I've been in the low six range. I was diagnosed in 1999 at the age of 52.

The doctor immediately placed me on medication without discussing life-style changes. I changed doctors, read about diabetes, and made those life style changes. As the years have progressed, I've had to tighten up my control and remain committed, as best I can to continuing to exercise and watching my diet.

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Seagal
Like some one has stated it is a complete mind set change. You have to learn how to enjoy things you never thought you would before being Dxed. My BG level is between 65-85 on most days, seldom ever see anything over 90. I have been in ketosis for over a year now and plan to keep it this way for some time to come.

 

Come on Marty.....you didn't mention you are an extraordinary, creative cook and that has to help a lot! Thanks for sharing your recipes btw:)

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