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jojeti

When to adjust basal insululin?

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Rekarb

I've been reading your thread and the one thing that comes to mind is diet.

Not eating is no way to handle blood sugars. It is what you eat that's important.

A low carb diet isn't typically calorie restricted. There's a good reason why, you have to eat something. When I first moved to a low carb diet, I really didn't know anything about it. I just knew that my bg's spiked behind certain kinds of foods. Once a food spiked me, I wouldn't eat it again but I also didn't know what I could eat so, sometimes, I just went hungry. The result was that my bg's would rise while at the same time, my lack of calories and my body switching over to burning fats made me feel awful.

It wasn't until I finally figured out what I could eat that this situation came under control. Eating to satiation is a sign of wellness to your body and until that occurs you essentially stay stressed and stress keeps your bg's high.

 

You really should try and stay away from the "healthy foods" for right now. I found that I couldn't handle fruits and most vegetables. Grains and grain products were a serious no-no.

 

The problem was that I was never a big meat eater and I didn't particularly care for fats. This took time and a lot of protein shakes to get over.

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foxl

jojeti, one more piece of confounding info -- Thyroxine increases insulin resistance.

 

I had not thought of it, but if they are forcing your TSH low, it may well be IR.

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jojeti
jojeti, one more piece of confounding info -- Thyroxine increases insulin resistance.

 

I had not thought of it, but if they are forcing your TSH low, it may well be IR.

 

Great! Another complicating fact...LOL... I seriously think I need to find an endocrinologist who may know something about this. I did ask for a vitamin D test and gave my blood for that test today. I also made an appointment with my doctor for Monday. I said the only way I could keep my numbers down was to starve myself...he said I better come in...LOL!

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foxl
I said the only way I could keep my numbers down was to starve myself...he said I better come in...LOL!

 

YEP I think he is right!

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psdaengr

I saw earlier in this thread a mention of the OPs doctor not being willing to do testing to verify the type of diabetes.

 

My advice to ANYONE with diabetes is that they should be seeing an endocrinologist on a regular basis for their diabetes management, and ideally, one who specializes in the treatment of diabetes.

 

An internist, family practitioner, gyne, or nurse practitioner should have an active role in your overall health management, but is not well enough versed to deal with the complexities of the diseases called diabetes, especially not in the early stages of establishing glucose control.

 

Other specialists who should be involved would be an ophthalmologist, a dentist and a podiatrist.

 

Folks in a forum like this are OK for general advise and relating how they deal with problems, but an endo is who you should turn to when you have a problem with glucose control.

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foxl

psd -- an Endocrinologist though, is NO GUARANTEE that you will get tested for type, or TREATED Type-appropriately, even IF tested ... :mad:

 

But I agree -- testing is crucial, and AACE needs to set proper guidelines for when and what to test.

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jenb
My advice to ANYONE with diabetes is that they should be seeing an endocrinologist on a regular basis for their diabetes management, and ideally, one who specializes in the treatment of diabetes.

 

An internist, family practitioner, gyne, or nurse practitioner should have an active role in your overall health management, but is not well enough versed to deal with the complexities of the diseases called diabetes, especially not in the early stages of establishing glucose control.

 

Hmm. My experience is contrary to this. My Endo and CDE were absolutely no help in establishing glucose control - both were in the thrall of ADA dietary guidelines which (IMHO) do not make sense. My wonderful GP, however, has gone the distance and has been my best ally! This may be the exception, of course, and a good Endocrinologist would be a beautiful thing...just haven't found the need to seek one out yet.

 

Jen

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