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bigskygal

High bg after exercise

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bigskygal

First of all, let me say that I'm never sure which forum to post on...I haven't been diagnosed as T1.5 (yet), but the pre-diabetes designation seems to imply people who are on the more typical path to T2 rather than what I think must be low but still close to sufficient insulin production in my case.

 

So, one thing I"ve been experiencing is high bg levels after exercising which AnCapMan told me in another thread is often due to the liver dumping glucose in response to the demands of anaerobic exercise when there is too little circulating insulin.

 

I'm wondering if people who've experienced this have any suggestions about how to deal with it thru food given that I'm not any meds. Here are some recent numbers to give you a sense of what I'm trying to address. Each day I ate something different before running for 45 minutes. I checked glucose levels 1.5 hours after eating.

 

Usual 10g carb breakfast: 163

Powerbar gel 8g carb: 206

Thin slice rye bread with peanut butter: 116, but it was still 115 3 hours later (before lunch)

I've also had days where bg goes down a little after exercise. :confused:

 

So nothing seems to be working consistently - it's all so unpredictable! I can keep experimenting but maybe someone has something that works for them.

 

Thanks!

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aiah23

Skip the powerbar gel, that's the 1st thing that comes to mind. The rye with peanut butter seems to be your best option. Since you aren't taking any meds this is harder to address (IMO) but I've been taking shots since 1992 so it's 2nd nature to me. Do you notice that your blood sugar actually drops about 4-5 hrs post exercise? That's something I typically come across when I'm high immediately after exercise.

 

Fawn

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Rekarb

I'm a cyclist and I typically go hard at it. My bg's tend to soar during and after a ride. It does come down to a nice lower level later but it takes an hour or so. I found that doing something like walking had a far better effect on my bg's than cycling.

 

I still go hard on a bike but I bike for me not diabetes.

 

Mike

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bigskygal

Thanks both of you for your responses. I will definitely try testing 4-5 hours after exercise and see if I'm lower than usual. It never occurred to me that the impact could be that delayed!

 

Rekarb, I agree, some things you have to do even if the meter doesn't like it. I enjoy walking, but it doesn't give me the same feeling as running!

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Caravaggio

If you run for only 45 minutes, I suggest skipping food before that (unless your last meal was 12 hours before or something). I run in the morning and do not eat pre-run if my run is for less than 1 hour. That may help keep your BG down.

 

If you need to eat, I suggest not doing it so close to your run. It seems to me that you eat not long before your run. That may explain your high BG. You may be compounding the rise in your BG that is linked to carb with your running right after food intake.

 

The intensity of your run may also affect your BG. My BG hardly shoots up if I run below a certain heart rate (which is slow to begin with). That translates to slower runs (although not necessarily that slow). If I run too hard, my BG goes much higher and quicker than I wish. It however stays low for the rest of the day.

 

Since I do speed trainings, I cannot completely avoid raising my BG for all my runs, but I expect a higher BG so I'm not so concerned about it. Plus, I limit my speed trainings (either in time or frequency) so I don't have a high BG for every run.

 

Try running at a much lower heart rate or at a much slower pace and test. That may be difficult, especially if you are used to running hard. It takes some getting used to. But, once your body gets used to training at a lower heart rate, you can slowly speed up while maintaining a lower heart rate.

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bigskygal

Hi Caravaggio,

 

Thanks for the advice. I can only run in the mornings right after I get up, so I haven't eaten for 12+ hours at that point. I did go for a shorter (but hard) run the other day so tried it without food. The results weren't terrible, but I had to eat pretty soon after the run because I was in meetings all day. Here's what happened.

 

Fasting bg: 111

20-minute run, and then tested about 15 minutes after finishing: 128

 

So, not a terrible rise, but I don't generally eat anything if bg's are over 120. However, I really needed to eat at that point. Unfortunately it wasn't possible to test much that day to see how things progressed. But my fasting the next morning was 100, the lowest reading for a long time so that seems like a good sign.

 

I'll try out a slower run next...:)

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bigskygal

Okay, finally got the chance to try out the slow running idea and had the time to test afterwards! Caravaggio, you were absolutely right: if I don't push myself, my numbers don't go up after running. In fact, this time they went down! Started with a 119 fasting and then was down to 98 :D after my "run" (at the time I usually see a rise after a harder run).

 

So, not sure what to do...if I don't run hard, my numbers look good, but if I don't run hard, I'm not really getting any exercise. :(

 

Bit of a dilemma...anyone solved it for themselves?

 

Thanks,

Kim

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dbaratta

 

I'm wondering if people who've experienced this have any suggestions about how to deal with it thru food given that I'm not any meds. Here are some recent numbers to give you a sense of what I'm trying to address. Each day I ate something different before running for 45 minutes. I checked glucose levels 1.5 hours after eating.

 

 

 

I have this problem all the time, what I found to work for me is to limit my cardio to 30 minutes. I can get away with a 40 min walk or 30min cardio in the beginning of my workout and another 10 to 15 at the end of my workout, BUT, I have to be sure not to push myself too hard or my BG is out of control. Food didn't seem to help so the limiting of cardio is what does the trick for me.

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Caravaggio
Okay, finally got the chance to try out the slow running idea and had the time to test afterwards! Caravaggio, you were absolutely right: if I don't push myself, my numbers don't go up after running. In fact, this time they went down! Started with a 119 fasting and then was down to 98 :D after my "run" (at the time I usually see a rise after a harder run).

 

So, not sure what to do...if I don't run hard, my numbers look good, but if I don't run hard, I'm not really getting any exercise. :(

 

Bit of a dilemma...anyone solved it for themselves?

 

Thanks,

Kim

 

 

Even if you don't run hard, you are still getting exercise. :)

 

Can you spare a few more minutes for exercise? If yes, then you can make up for the intensity by exercising longer.

 

Another possibility is to train your body to increase speed in small increments and test afterwards.

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bigskygal

Caravaggio,

 

Thanks for the further guidance. I think this might mean being much more disciplined than I have been with my exercise, especially if I want to try and train my body not to spike. Basically, I what I do now is just go out the door and run for about 45 minutes, I have a really nice almost 5-mile loop from my house.

 

I saw in your post on the exercise after breakfast thread that you don't worry about spikes after exercise since your numbers tend to run lower all day after that. Can I ask what kind of spike you tend to get? How much does your bg actually rise if you do a hard workout? And how long does it take to come back down?

 

Here's how my day looked after the slower run (I tested a bunch to see what was going on). I'll try and do the same tomorrow after my usual run. I'm on a low-carb diet, approximately 20g/meal, breakfast is lower.

 

Fasting: 119

Slow run

Before breakfast: 98 & 2 hours after: 124

1 hour after lunch: 154

Before dinner: 82 :D (don't usually see #'s like that!)

4 hours after dinner: 118

 

So the before dinner number was great and it was a change to drop that much after exercise as I usually stay the same or go up, other than that it looks like what I typically see.

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bigskygal

Dbaretta,

 

I did try a 30-minute run rather than my usual 45 and didn't see much difference in my readings. But it's probably worth trying again. I realize this is probably a case of YMMV, but I do appreciate learning from others' experience!

 

Kim

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Caravaggio

If I do speed training or a hard run (usually no longer than 40 minutes, with 10 min. warm up and 10 min. cooldown), my BG will usually go up between 30 to 40 points. So if I start with say 110, it will go up to about 150. I have my post-run breakfast and diabetes meds, then in about 2 hours my BG will go down to 80-95 and stay there for the rest of the day (but of course I do not load up on rice, pasta or noodles for lunch or dinner :D ).

 

My usual post-run breakfast lately consists of 1-1/2 tall glass of shake (soy milk, yogurt, 1/2 banana, other fruits that are available and berries), with omelette with vegetables and bits of meat or shirataki noodles with vegetables and meat or whatever I can make from left-overs.

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