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Ategeler

Tired of needing to justify

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matingara
And I view Diabetes as a *symptom* and not a disease. There are many different causes for this *symptom.* It's like saying, "I suffer from headaches" and calling Headaches a disease.

 

i agree vehemently. it is not a disease any more than having a pale complexion and being very sensitive to sunlight is a disease.

 

in my case, the Doc assented to insulin immediately upon my request. i don't know if this is an Australian thing or not. we treat our doctors as skilled technicians... (and some are more skilled than others).

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Subby
i agree vehemently. it is not a disease any more than having a pale complexion and being very sensitive to sunlight is a disease.

 

Hmm, I have to assume you are talking about diabetes as a whole, since no qualifiers have been made for particular cases. In the case of type 1 diabetes, I don't get your point. Neither pale complexions or sun sensitivity involve the almost total malfunction of a vital organ due to an autoimmune attack. And just because they don't exactly know what triggered it, doesn't turn it into a "non disease".

 

I'm get suspicious feelings when people try to avoid calling diabetes a disease. Why I get suspicious is this: there is only one reason for strongly washing your hands of the word "disease": and that is that you consider the word dirty, derogatory, a matter to judge people with: and you'll have none of that for yourself, thanks. It can either be for that primary reason, or by extension, it's a form of denial. I'm not one of THOSE people, those diseased, inferior people. Or, it doesn't exist. It's not real. So either you are in denial, which I understand, or you are judgemental yourself, which I also understand. To some degree both problems seem endemic to being human.

 

Well, by virtually any shared definition of the word you care to find, Type 1 and most instances of other common forms of diabetes would be considered a disease. (Of course, we can all just go away and make up our own languages... but I think that's rather a different thing). I'd suggest facing up to it, then changing your perception about what "disease" really means. It means something systematic and verifiable has gone wrong with your body, and certainly in the case of type 1, continues to go wrong (constant killing off of beta cells). So what. You can live your life just as fully, with just as much joy and just as much freedom facing this fact, facing the truth as far as our typical linguistic categories apply - as if you run around worrying about if you are can be classified "diseased" or not.

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Subby

By the way, Joel, most of my comments weren't actually directed at you directly, personally, except for the first paragraph. I imagine you don't mind anyway as you proclaim you are opinionated and forthright, and welcome others to be the same, but for clarification the rest were my thoughts on the tendency to try to avoid the term disease at all costs, in general.

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foxl

Subby I think the reason for not calling D "A" disease is that it has many causes. Clearly, autoimmune beta cell destruction is one disease ... or is it? What caused the autoimmune attack, in the first place? That is the question ...

 

As far as the pallor / sunburn association. Well, I think anyone stranded on a desert island would recognize, the lethality of the condition is circumstantial ...

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Subby
Subby I think the reason for not calling D "A" disease is that it has many causes. Clearly, autoimmune beta cell destruction is one disease ... or is it? What caused the autoimmune attack, in the first place? That is the question ...

 

Is ambiguity of genesis really a valid reason for not calling something a "disease"? It's boring quoting definitions, but this sort of one (just the first coming up in a search) tends to allow for disease to come about in all manner of ways...

1. A pathological condition of a part, organ, or system of an organism resulting from various causes, such as infection, genetic defect, or environmental stress, and characterized by an identifiable group of signs or symptoms.

http://www.answers.com/topic/disease

 

The causes mentioned here, may have been triggered by other things. Doesn't stop something beng a disease. As for being a plural, I can understand that but it doesn't support removing the term altogether. And, I'm happy for some instances of diabetes to not be a disease in the way more obvious forms like classic type 1, are, in terms of clear symptoms and likely causes. The sentiment I'm answering to here, is in a general discussion of all "diabetes" as far as I can tell (I could be wrong).

 

Why is it important to try and remove the moniker "disease" anyway, even if further delineation between causes is a truly worthwhile and hopefully forthcoming thing, and may mean re-classification? We can only work with what we know... and hope for the future to educate us better.

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foxl
Is ambiguity of genesis really a valid reason for not calling something a "disease"? It's boring quoting definitions, but this sort of one (just the first coming up in a search) tends to allow for disease to come about in all manner of ways...

disease: Definition, Synonyms from Answers.com

 

So we may be looking at a cluster of diseases. They are still diseases, by an ordinary definition!

 

Yes, a cluster of diseases, all of which have the symptom of hyperglycemia. Exactly. I think we only disagree on semantics, really!

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Subby
Yes, a cluster of diseases, all of which have the symptom of hyperglycemia. Exactly. I think we only disagree on semantics, really!

 

Sure, cluster works for me. This kind of differentiation makes sense. It's some people I meet in RL and sometimes online, who insist it's not a disease and use that as a reason to avoid it, that worries me. Of course, if their control gets along just fine in that state, it's not so much of an issue for them personally... for now.

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bigskygal
My endo feels quite strongly that there are antibodies that haven't been discovered yet. He says he has many patients with low c-peptides that are young at dx and not overweight, yet negative for antibodies. He also feels as more research is done and more is understood, we'll see new subtypes of diabetes.

 

Yes, my endo told me the same thing about the antibodies for autoimmune thyroid disease (I have Grave's). Some endo's will test for them and say if they're gone or decreased that points toward the possibility of remission, but mine doesn't do antibody testing because he says there are too many antibodies we haven't discovered yet or at least haven't developed tests for. My guess is that's why 20% of T1's don't show any antibodies...they just don't have the particular ones that are tested for, obviously something attacked their pancreas.

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TommyC1
Even one of my doctor's questioned me. So frustrating to feel like I need to prove my diagnosis to others.

 

I wouldn't worry about explaining it to most folks. But it might be a good test of Docs.

If I had a Dr. who needed to have Type 1.5 explained or justified he or she would get fired. Ignorant Docs are scary.

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foxl
I wouldn't worry about explaining it to most folks. But it might be a good test of Docs.

If I had a Dr. who needed to have Type 1.5 explained or justified he or she would get fired. Ignorant Docs are scary.

 

 

I actually disagree ... I have MORE respect for my internist because he was willing to admit he did not know. Much of the role of the internist is determining whether you need a specialist. :)

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Ken58
Do any of you feel this way? Everytime someone asks me what type I am... I tell them LADA/Type 1.5. They ask what it is...I explain it. Then they proceed to look at me as if I don't know what I am talking about and that Type 1's only get it as kids and that I must be Type 2. Even one of my doctor's questioned me. So frustrating to feel like I need to prove my diagnosis to others. More information about LADA/Type 1.5 needs to get out to the general public so that people are more informed about all forms of Diabetes.

 

Phew...now that I got that off my chest :-).

 

I know where you are coming from with that. I too am tired of the looks and comments I get when I tell them that I was diagnosted a couple of years ago. I actually had one person look at me and say "You don't look that fat." ARG!!!

 

Hang in there, you are not the only one. Even if it seems that way most of the time.

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LoriV

I was Dx Type 2 almost 4 years ago and have struggled on and off with meds and insulin. My fasting numbers are always above 150 and my numbers throughout the day go from 200's to 300's. It's been so frustrating! I just took a GAD blood test yesterday and I'am waiting for the results. What should I be looking for in these results. Numbers..... positive vs negative??? Not sure....

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foxl

Hi, Lori V. I was told that ANY GAD antibodies' presence, whatsoever, indicate autoimmune activity.

 

I am using insulin and it gives me much better control.

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renflute

Reading this thread certainly shows how complicated this disease is! I have recently bee diagnosed as a type 1.5 by a new endo. I was originally diagnosed a type 2 seventeen years ago, and I was hypothyroid and anemic at the same time. I am trying to learn more about the 1.5 thing...what it all means. I started on oral meds, then eventually went to insulin injections, and now I am on a pump (for 3 years.) Any additional infor about type 1.5 would be appreciated.

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foxl
Reading this thread certainly shows how complicated this disease is! I have recently bee diagnosed as a type 1.5 by a new endo. I was originally diagnosed a type 2 seventeen years ago, and I was hypothyroid and anemic at the same time. I am trying to learn more about the 1.5 thing...what it all means. I started on oral meds, then eventually went to insulin injections, and now I am on a pump (for 3 years.) Any additional infor about type 1.5 would be appreciated.

 

 

You will want to read about APS-2 and APS-3. I strongly believe that is what I have got -- my Great-Grandmother died of Pernicious anemia!

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Tribbles
Reading this thread certainly shows how complicated this disease is! I have recently bee diagnosed as a type 1.5 by a new endo. I was originally diagnosed a type 2 seventeen years ago, and I was hypothyroid and anemic at the same time. I am trying to learn more about the 1.5 thing...what it all means. I started on oral meds, then eventually went to insulin injections, and now I am on a pump (for 3 years.) Any additional infor about type 1.5 would be appreciated.

 

It makes little difference as to how you manage the disease. The big plus if you are in the US is that now you are a Type 1 the insurers are willing to provide things that they would otherwise require a lot of arguing to do - CGMS spring to mind.

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sweetstar

I haven't been reading the posts on this forum too long. But the info here is just amazing.

I have questions about a couple of abbreviations.

What is GAD?

What is pep-tid?

Thanks,j

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Tribbles

GAD is usually means GAD65 which is a particular antibody that causes diabetes (there are other GAD antibodies but 65 is the interesting one for us). The presence of GAD65 anibodies in large numbers usually indicates that your immune system has lost the plot and is attacking your insulin producing cells.

 

C-peptide is produced when you body split pro-insulin to release insulin into your system. Unlike insulin it hangs around in the body for a while so it is an easy way to measure insulin output.

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