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WendyL10

My bad

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WendyL10

well, i guess you guys were right, my bad :(

 

so, despite how badly i don't want to be on insulin and want to try an oral, after meeting with a CDE today and again with my Endo, i have to realize i'm a type 1 LADA and the reason I have diabetes is because I don't produce ENOUGH insulin.

 

Thus, because I'm still losing weight, although keeping my numbers within a normal range, I'm not eating enough and Endo now does want me to start back on Lantus so I will eat more. UGH! Honestly, I'm so scared. The thought of this horrifies me.

 

Did anyone here have relatively low numbers while honeymooning yet still started on basal? I'm supposed to start out with even as little as 2 units lantus, just to ensure I have insulin and to get started on this. I'm so afraid, again I saw a 85 blood sugar this afternoon, I'll go low. But, my numbers in the AM are starting to rise and Endo doesn't really want me above and staying at anything above 150.

 

Guess I'll just do it. Increase 4 units if needed.

 

If anyone could provide some feedback, encouragement, etc...that would be great. I have such a HUGE drug phobia.

 

Did you guys gain weight on insulin, have any bad reactions.

 

Thanks much!

 

Wendy

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ant hill

Hello Wendy, Insulin will help you gain weight and also make you feel much better. Are you an active girl? If you are then good!!! Exercise is also apart of your diet. Also you would have to watch what you eat as Carbohydrates is what we look at with the insulin to match. If you do some activity have the sugar tabs or other hypo fix. ;):)

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sarahspins
I'm so afraid, again I saw a 85 blood sugar this afternoon, I'll go low.

 

You won't go low on a couple units of Lantus :) If the action is flat over 24 hours for you, you'd expect that 85 to become maybe an 80 - far from anything to worry about. Just test often, and keep some fast acting glucose on hand and you should be fine.

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WendyL10
Hello Wendy, Insulin will help you gain weight and also make you feel much better. Are you an active girl? If you are then good!!! Exercise is also apart of your diet. Also you would have to watch what you eat as Carbohydrates is what we look at with the insulin to match. If you do some activity have the sugar tabs or other hypo fix. ;):)

 

OK, thanks! But, I don't want to gain weight. My doctor may think I'm too thin, I don't. I really don't want to gain weight.

 

I exercise all the time, have my entire life, i've very healthy, other than...well, I have type 1 diabetes..ugh!

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WendyL10

Also, one more question, please...:)

 

I had a snack about two hours ago, I was at 85, tried about 35- 40 carbs, usually don't eat that many, and went to 155 two hours after. that's too high right, too high of a jump. right?

 

Oh, i'm so confused!

 

thank you!

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jtausch

yea to big of a jump usually no more than 30 points or less is good. if you want a snack, cut out the carbs and try some protein, or celery any low cal vegetable I even eat carrots in moderation( the are low in carbs)

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ant hill
OK, thanks! But, I don't want to gain weight. My doctor may think I'm too thin, I don't. I really don't want to gain weight.

 

I exercise all the time, have my entire life, i've very healthy, other than...well, I have type 1 diabetes..ugh!

 

Wendy, Keep up the exercise as that will keep you trim but please make sure that you have an OJ or something that will get you out of a low and test regularly. There's a course that will give you a better understanding to this disease. I have found that to count the carbs to your amount of insulin. If you know that you are about to do heavy exercise, I would have some carbs as there is a burn off effect. It's a balance between foods, Insulin and exercise. :)

 

Keep the exercise!!!

As that will keep the fat at bay.

:D:D:D

:T:T

;)

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dbc
i'm a type 1 LADA and the reason I have diabetes is because I don't produce ENOUGH insulin.

 

Thus, because I'm still losing weight, although keeping my numbers within a normal range, I'm not eating enough and Endo now does want me to start back on Lantus so I will eat more. UGH! Honestly, I'm so scared. The thought of this horrifies me.

 

Did anyone here have relatively low numbers while honeymooning yet still started on basal? I'm supposed to start out with even as little as 2 units lantus, just to ensure I have insulin and to get started on this. I'm so afraid, again I saw a 85 blood sugar this afternoon, I'll go low. But, my numbers in the AM are starting to rise and Endo doesn't really want me above and staying at anything above 150.

 

 

Hi Wendy

 

Most of us can identify with your reaction to the T1 diagnosis - I remember thinking I'd been handed down a death sentence :eek: !! Hang in there, in a couple of months you'll look back and wonder what all the fuss was about :)

 

You don't say what your A1c is. I managed blood sugar control OK on diet & exercise for about 2 years from diagnosis until my A1c measurement drifted above 6.5% - that was the threshold my endo looked at to decide when was the "right" time to start insulin. I also started on a low dose which has crept up to 7U lantus/day now (3 years later).

 

Perhaps you need to look at it like this: You're not really "taking a drug" - you're replacing something that your body no longer produces itself.....

 

good luck!

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Cluck

Hi Wendy. I remember the fear after being diagnosed with Type I and having to start shooting insulin. The fear is normal, expected and it will ease as you start looking after yourself.

 

Can I ask what you weigh? You say that your doctor thinks that you are too thin but you do not. This is worrying. At diagnosis I was super thin for me and looked like a walking skeleton. I have a booty but that had gone, and my face looked far older than my years.

 

A little added weight really helped give me the strength to take care of myself and learn more about this disease.

 

All the best to you. This is a great forum with many experienced and caring people to help if you want it.

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xMenace
If anyone could provide some feedback, encouragement, etc...that would be great. I have such a HUGE drug phobia.

 

Did you guys gain weight on insulin, have any bad reactions.

 

Yes and yes.

 

Understand a few things

 

- insulin does/can drive weight

- insulin can drive your BGs dangerously low

- insulin will enable you to live a long and happy life!

 

There's risks, but there's a balance. It's dangerous to take too much and it's equally dangerous to take too little. You'll hear lots of advice and stories about how what we think and do, but you really need to find your own balance.

 

The good news is we can help save you from the nasty mistakes we've made, and where your dosage is so small, you have time to ease into the pool.

 

For the weight, keep your carbs down (not out) and eat real foods. Avoid reined sugars and grains except for celebrations.

 

I don't want to gain weight. My doctor may think I'm too thin, I don't. I really don't want to gain weight.

 

Lantus can be a weight driver and a hypo/hyper generator for many. It nearly killed me. But I now know why, and I have management plans ready to implement if I need to go back on it at some point.

 

The key is to understand your basal pattern. We each have our own unique fingerprint, so it's really not possible to exactly say how to treat yours. But I can help you understand yours. It may not be possible at the moment though where your basal need is very low.

 

Basically your need will have hills and valleys to some degree. If you are a flatliner, and about 2/3 are, then Lantus will work very well. If you're very up and down like me, then a flat insulin like Lantus or Levemir is not a good fit by itself. Unfortunately that means a bit of work to fihure out.

 

We learn our own profile by basal testing; that is we do some regorous interval testing without the influences of food, activity, stress, etc. There are a few questions you really want to know:

- your sleeping behavior. Do you rise, stay level, or crash? I crash and unfortunately I burned too.

- how big is your dawn phenomenon? I crash at night then have a huge rise starting after 5am. My whole problem stemmed from trying to treat this rise with Lantus that sent me crashing in my sleep. This is one of the toughest scenarios to treat. The best way might be to titrate your Lantus dose to your sleeping numbers then augment it with an early morning bolus. But I like to sleep in :(

- in the afternoon nearly everybody drops. Understand that this can drive food consumption.

- evening hours can require more insulin in many. Also if you take a single low dose, it may wear off before 24 hours and exacerbate highs.

 

I had a snack about two hours ago, I was at 85, tried about 35- 40 carbs, usually don't eat that many, and went to 155 two hours after. that's too high right, too high of a jump. right?

 

You want it under 140 after 2 hours and under 180 100% of the time.

 

BUT IT WON'T HAPPEN 100% of the time. **** happens with this disease. The first rule is DON'T GET UPSET when you don't behave. If you made a mistake, learn from it. Very often your body just doesn't want to behave. Guilt is not allowed here. It's our enemy. These little variations won't kill you if the majority of your tests are good.

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dbaratta

 

Did you guys gain weight on insulin, have any bad reactions.

 

Thanks much!

 

Wendy

 

Yes i gained weight on Lantus but I think the problem was I was getting too much in the beginning for the first few months. I went up to 35 units and today I only need 16 units so all that extra insulin made me gain weight. Just be careful with your food and increase slowly (according to your doc of course) and you should be fine.

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foxl

Are you a high-titre LADA, or a low-titre LADA? Grooooooan, yes this article argues that some are more like Type 2 (me I kinda suspect) and some are more like Type 1 ... I had the "advantage" of reading the whole article, yesterday.

 

Suspect, Wendy you are more like T1 ... but anyhow.

 

 

Diabet Med. 2010 Jun;27(6):701-4.

Association of TCF7L2 gene variants with low GAD autoantibody titre in LADA subjects (NIRAD Study 5).

 

Zampetti S, Spoletini M, Petrone A, Capizzi M, Arpi ML, Tiberti C, Di Pietro S, Bosi E, Pozzilli P, Giorgino F, Buzzetti R; Nirad Study Group.

 

Department of Clinical Sciences, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy.

Abstract

 

AIMS: We previously demonstrated the presence of two different populations among adult-onset autoimmune diabetes (latent autoimmume diabetes of adults; LADA) having high or low titre of antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADA). The transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) gene has been recognized as the major gene associated with Type 2 diabetes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the phenotypic heterogeneity of LADA based on GADA titre is associated with TCF7L2 polymorphisms. METHODS: Two hundred and fifty patients identified as LADA, divided into two subgroups with low (< or = 32 arbitrary units) or high (> 32 units) GADA titre, 620 subjects with Type 2 diabetes [from the Non-Insulin Requiring Autoimmune Diabetes (NIRAD) study cohort of 5330 subjects] in addition to 551 consecutive cases of Type 1 diabetes and 545 normoglycaemic subjects were analysed for the rs12255372 and rs7903146 polymorphisms of the TCF7L2 gene using Taqman. RESULTS: The genotype and allele distributions of the two polymorphisms revealed similar frequencies in subjects with low GADA titre and Type 2 diabetes. High GADA titre, Type 1 diabetes and controls also showed comparable frequencies. A significant increase of GT/TT genotypes of the rs12255372 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and CT/TT genotypes of the rs7903146 SNP was observed in low GADA titre and Type 2 diabetes compared with high GADA titre, Type 1 diabetes and controls (P < or = 0.04 for both comparisons). The risk alleles of both variants were increased in low GADA titre and Type 2 diabetes compared with high GADA titre, Type 1 diabetes and control subjects (P < 0.02 for all comparisons). CONCLUSIONS: TCF7L2 common genetic variants of susceptibility are associated only with low GADA antibody titre in LADA patients.

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foxl

Separating the posts to give you my experience:

 

I spent 14 mos suspecting I needed insulin, before I got it. It is VERY easy, just start really low. Basal is less apt to cause hypos than bolus. I use 6U Levemir per night currently and am doing well and quite happy so far. And yes, I regularly see and saw midday numbers in the 80's -- it is my low time of day.

 

Get glucose tabs "in case," and also divide your daily carbs into numerous snacks to keep things stable ... you will do fine, though!

 

Oh and weight gain -- it might take some fiddling to get your dose sorted out, but I found I had some mild water retention at first (puffy fingers!), brought my dose back down and it went away ... but nothing drastic -- 2 - 4 lb anyhow.

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zoelula

Hi Wendy

 

I was very anxious when I first started insulin, but what helped me was both knowledge and experience. I'm not too big on the theories, because I was already overwhelmed, but I needed people to answer specific questions and to reassure me. It sounds like you had two of the same fears I did: weight gain and lows. So I'll speak to those. I have now been on insulin for a year and a couple months. I go up and down between 133 and 137. I have 16 years recovery from an eating disorder but still became anxious when I hit 137 and because my insulin needs have gone up a bit in that year as my insulin production decreases. My understanding is that insulin per se doesn't cause weight gain; at least not in the small doses us Type 1/LADAs use it. It is the eating too many carbs and trying to cover it, going low and over-treating, etc that causes weight gain and insulin resistance. I also, unlike many people on here, DO believe that high fat is not a good thing, so I watch my fat intake as well as my carbs. If you already exercise regularly you are ahead of me, because that is one habit I never got.

 

As for lows, I DID experience one scary low when I first started insulin but that is because I was taking way too much in a totally incorrect way (I am embaressed to admit how ignorant I was, so I won't go into details!). That totally avoidable experience gave me a healthy respect for insulin. I read Using Insulin by John Walsh and talked to people on here and another forum. Knowledge is power against fear! I figured my I:C ratios and my correction factor. I know how to compute insulin on board. I started conservatively, only correcting if I was over 200. Now I feel comfortable that I will not go low and I correct more aggressively. I took total control of my insulin doses which helped me feel confident and I learned to keep records of blood sugar (testing 8 times minimum) and what I ate. One page of numbers was three weeks and then I would look back over and see the success rates which I'd highlighted and make a small change as needed. I kept to the changes for three days before considering more change. I have not had a severe low since! The lows I do get are very manageable with 2 glucose tabs or with eating if it's due. With the correct basal rate I don't drop down when it's time to eat so I don't have to worry.

 

In short, my numbers aren't perfect (whose are?) but it has settled into a routine and I don't feel fearful at all. Insulin is a tool I know how to use. My weight is stable and I enjoy the things I cook and eat. Going out to eat still is difficult but that is a minor thing. It's a big learning curve, and I sure remember feeling anxious and overwhelmed, but take it slow, read up, ask questions and you will be posting a reassuring post about insulin use for someone else a short ways down the road!

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