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yogirajj

Staying Positive

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yogirajj

I have lived with diabetes all my life (43 yrs); became insulin dependent in 2009, in addition to the many challenges of diabetes. Unfortunately, I’ve been misdiagnosed many times throughout my life (despite all the symptoms and warning signs).

 

In 2005, I have developed full blown cataracts. Although my vision loss was temporary, it has reeked havoc in my life. I’ve had the surgeries needed to remove the cataracts in 2006, and both operations were successi!!

 

Finally, I have overcome much of my diabetic complications thus far; through faith in myself; emotional endurance; and the willingness and desire for self-education. Diabetes is no easy thing, therefore, I have created a blog to tell my story. This is my contribution to the diabetic community. I am here to let everyone know, it is possible to not only overcome your diabetes, but live a very normal life just like everyone else. Please show your love and support.

 

DiabeticRadio.com

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juan_perez

Are you 43 years old, and you became insulin dependant after more than 40 years of having diabetes? Am I correct? If so, your case is amazing!!!

 

Thanks for your post.

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yogirajj

Yes... Because none of the oral drugs worked.. I became very sick because of the drug side effects. I've never made enough insulin. Even when eating healthier, it still was always on the higher side after 2 hours.

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Jeanne D

Thanks for sharing this yogirajj.

That is certainly encouraging.

 

What do you think about taking insulin? I may be headed in that direction and I'm scared about it.

 

This disease is hard to deal with because there seem to be so many variations, but I agree that a positive attitude it important.

 

All the best to you,

 

Jeanne

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yogirajj

Hey Jeanne,

 

My apologies for the late reply. Don't be scared of insulin. There's nothing to be scared about really. After awhile, you'll realized that you've been scared for nothing!! Yes, it is a big responsibility, just because you always have to be mindful of your carbs and insulin dosages; however, even without insulin, we should always be counting our carbs anyway.

 

You'll be fine.

 

 

 

Thanks for sharing this yogirajj.

That is certainly encouraging.

 

What do you think about taking insulin? I may be headed in that direction and I'm scared about it.

 

This disease is hard to deal with because there seem to be so many variations, but I agree that a positive attitude it important.

 

All the best to you,

 

Jeanne

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Gladtobehere
we should always be counting our carbs anyway.

 

Most people, diabetic or not, don't understand this. But it is very, very true. The doctors have been saying it for years. Moderation is the key.

 

I can also say that insulin is probably less scary than taking other medication once you overcome any fear of syringes. I'm 30 + year insulin dependant and I still hate needles. BUT, only needles in the hands of others.

 

Giving myself an insulin shot is nothing.

 

BUT! When the nurse at the flu clinic grips the syringe like a harpoon it is white knuckle time:D. Or when the vampires :eek: at the lab seem to target nerves and not veins it can be very exciting. Of course an occasional adrenaline rush is not too bad. :-)

 

Self injection with a 5mm syringe (or now a steel infusion set) is rarely (in my case) even felt. And yes I am looking at what I am doing.

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Seagal

Gosh, I don't recall any of the medical profession (drs. CDE's, ADA, etc.) telling me to watch carbs. That doesn't seem to be the case with most of the people I've come across on different diabetes forums. Their idea of moderation is "whole grains, fruits and vegetables".

 

I have looked at a lot of the different diabetes forums and there aren't very many that think it is a terrific idea to reduce carbs and add saturated fats. This forum is one of the very few that accepts the various methods used by all of us and one of them is low/lower cho. I find it very sad that, that is the real truth, but optimistic and encouraged by the numbers of new visitors and members we see daily.

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yogirajj

Hi Seagal,

 

Unfortunately, this is why there's a difference between a non-diabetic trying to teach a diabetic how to live, and a diabetic teaching another diabetic, real-life experiences. Which I always talk about on my blog. The big problem I have is that most doctors and nurses deal with you in a text book mannor, not understanding that everybody's diabetes is not the same, everyone's diabetic circumstances are not the same either. It's tuff, what can I tell you? However, the bottom line is, this disease leaves it up to the patient, to have that drive and hunger to learn more outside of their doctors. These stories are not uncommon.

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Street

Dear Jeanne D., I have been diagnosed Type II since 2009 after being misdiagnosed for many years when i was first put on meds i was on 2 orals and old syringe and vial insulin i

worked so hard and deprived myself of everything because being on insulin scared me i seen what it did to my grandparents and left those weird indention marks so i practically starved myself and ate near no carbs and was able to come off one oral med and the insulin and then when i woke up and seen this was no life for anybody to have to suffer with and

learned how to maintain my BS up until about 6 months ago when i started getting steroid injections in my back it caused my BS to go haywire like no tomorrow my Dr. put me back on insulin with Novolog pen with ultra fine needles i was depressed about it to begin with but understand this constantly being afraid will only cause you to run from the issue and

when you keep running it never goes away and will continue to remain and possibly get worse and cause more damage you will see that the injections are not as bad as it seems

medications have changed so much from the time of my grandparents who are now in their mid 80s and doing fine for the most part i felt all alone to begin with because i had

nobody to turn to to just talk about this i joined one other forum and found out there are so many of us out there that were afraid of insulin and the needles and talking with people either on a forum or on the phone or in person you will see that this can be a positive step in your life to help you keep control of your BS i hope you reading a bit of my story you will see that this is not as bad as it seems and i hope you it will ease your fears just a little bit

 

 

 

 

Thanks for sharing this yogirajj.

That is certainly encouraging.

 

What do you think about taking insulin? I may be headed in that direction and I'm scared about it.

 

This disease is hard to deal with because there seem to be so many variations, but I agree that a positive attitude it important.

 

All the best to you,

 

Jeanne

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Cormac_Doyle
Self injection with a 5mm syringe (or now a steel infusion set) is rarely (in my case) even felt. And yes I am looking at what I am doing.

 

Just to be positive ...

 

If Superman developed Diabetes, would he be able to inject himself, or would his skin be impervious to the needles ?

 

:):D

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