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Petruchio

Glucosamine causes the death of pancreatic cells

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Petruchio

Glucosamine causes the death of pancreatic cells

 

 

Glucosamine causes the death of pancreatic cells

 

This release is available in French.

 

Quebec City, October 27, 2010—High doses or prolonged use of glucosamine causes the death of pancreatic cells and could increase the risk of developing diabetes, according to a team of researchers at Université Laval's Faculty of Pharmacy. Details of this discovery were recently published on the website of the Journal of Endocrinology.

 

In vitro tests conducted by Professor Frédéric Picard and his team revealed that glucosamine exposure causes a significant increase in mortality in insulin-producing pancreatic cells, a phenomenon tied to the development of diabetes. Cell death rate increases with glucosamine dose and exposure time. "In our experiments, we used doses five to ten times higher than that recommended by most manufacturers, or 1,500 mg/day," stressed Professor Picard. "Previous studies showed that a significant proportion of glucosamine users up the dose hoping to increase the effects," he explained.

 

Picard and his team have shown that glucosamine triggers a mechanism intended to lower very high blood sugar levels. However, this reaction negatively affects SIRT1, a protein critical to cell survival. A high concentration of glucosamine diminishes the level of SIRT1, leading to cell death in the tissues where this protein is abundant, such as the pancreas.

 

Individuals who use large amounts of glucosamine, those who consume it for long periods, and those with little SIRT1 in their cells are therefore believed to be at greater risk of developing diabetes. In a number of mammal species, SIRT1 level diminishes with age. This phenomenon has not been shown in humans but if it were the case, the elderly—who constitute the target market for glucosamine—would be even more vulnerable.

 

"The key point of our work is that glucosamine can have effects that are far from harmless and should be used with great caution," concluded Professor Picard.

 

The results obtained by Picard and his team coincide with recent studies that cast serious doubt on the effectiveness of glucosamine in treating joint problems.

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janice21475

This does not surprise me. The last time we were taking Glucosamine my husband seemed to have a 'bad reaction.' It was so bad we stopped taking the tablets. This was prior to his being diagnosed with T2, although from the symptoms he had been having for years prior to that we are sure he had it for a very long time before diagnoses.

 

Makes ya think it is a 'population thinning' thing. Thanks for posting,

Janice & Husband

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Seagal

I sure wish I knew someone who could use the really large bottle of my glucosamine capsules. The were pretty pricey and I wouldn't want to cause health damage to anyone in my family. Wonder if the company would take them and donate....prolly not, since they have been opened. What a shame.

 

At least the purified liquid MSM is said to be "safe".

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adiantum

I sit a full moon healthdiscoveryjournal?????????

 

 

very informative forum about Glucosamine. it is Proven effective for arthritic hips, knees, shoulders, backs and other painful areas

 

thanks

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Cora

To be honest with  you, I always take in vitro testing with a grain of salt. How a pancreatic cell will react in a petri dish with a huge amount of glucosamine (soemthing it would never ocme in contact with in a natural environment) is quite likely going to be vastly different than a real world scenario. Checking IR in a large group of diabetics and keeping all things equal except for the glucosamine? That would be a study worth reading.

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Uff Da

I'll continue to take my glucosamine. I never did take it in higher than recommended doses, but I have taken it for years. But even if it did contribute to developing type 1 LADA at age 70, I've got diabetes now and dropping the glucosamine wouldn't change that. I used to have a lot of pain with my arthritis and now have almost none, which change may be from the glucosamine.

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Book Woman

Hi! My rheumatologist prescribed 1000mg 3x daily along with 50ml hyaluronic acid 2x daily and my pain is much lower. It is a difficult balance to keep when you have several health issues to take into consideration! Ugh!

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Seagal

Looks like todays dose is at the article's highest dose "In our experiments, we used doses five to ten times higher than those recommended by manufacturers or 1500 mg."  Of course it was written four years ago, so times have changed and so has research.  I would be interested in seeing more data on pancreatic cell death by glucosamine.

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ant hill

Geez this is just so strait forward!!!

First of all what's Glucose? The answer is sugar in the body. This stuff is a super concentrate!!!!!!!!!! :o We have a pancreas that is working overtime keeping up with an already supply of Carbs = Glucose so this Glucoseamine will just send the Pancreas to the moon with no return. So it's no wonder it kills Pancreatic Cells.

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janice21475

Looking at it that way, Peter, it is no wonder that the last time my Husband tried Glucoseamine he got very sick.

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