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dturney

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ShottleBop
I bet your pudding is made out of frog eggs???? you do mean HF/LC for ole Bernstein????...you do know he is a type one??? The HF/LC diet was the diet most Diabetics were place on before insulin was availible...I suppose if your are not a diabetic then the HF/LC diet would be great...some fat, some protine and some carbs are my gig....and chocolate pudding .

 

And your point is? Yes, Bernstein is HF/LC, and yes, he's a Type 1--but he treats an awful lot of Type 2s, as well, and speaks from experience. Hey, I eat to my meter--which, 9 out of the 12 months of last year, averaged 90, testing at least 7 times a day.

 

MY chocolate pudding and ice cream are made with coconut cream, stevia, and unsweetened cocoa powder (and, in the case of ice cream, a few eggs, as well). Have a half-cup serving for dessert pert' near every night. I usually have some Trader Joe's unsweetened baking chocolate, too, either as an afternoon snack or as part of dessert. And I eat a fair amount of veggies: a whole avocado every morning for breakfast, sliced tomatoes with an omelet (spinach and feta, mushroom and [something else], avocado and Canadian bacon) for lunch-when I don't have a spinach salad or a Cobb salad, or house salad (accompanying a bunless burger); dinners are usually served on a bed of mixed greens, and sometimes include cauliflower, brussels sprouts, asparagus, collard greens, etc. (Collard greens sauteed in butter with bacon bits taste great!) This morning, we had a good-bye breakfast at work for a fellow employee. I ate the insides of a chorizo and egg burrito and had a couple of blackberries and half a strawberry. Smaller amounts of fruits with a fairly high fiber-to-sugar ratio, savored well. BG before: 89. BG two hours later: 88.

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samorgan
I agree with Salim about Balance meaning harmony.... I think we all know that when we're diagnosed .....there is No Balance....that's what the journey is all about...

 

We all start out confused , and clueless on what direction to take, but in time...each one of us has found a road to take and we have or we will(for the Newbies) find the Balance....which means whatever you do(eating, exercise, meds,insulin) that brings your Bg's under control and at whatever acceptable level you set for yourself..then you have found the Balance.....that's what Balance means to me....whatever Lifestyle you choose for yourself that gets your Bg's to an acceptable level you can live with.

 

If you are there now..you have found the Balance....hold on to it and stay the course...you're one of the lucky ones...if you're not there yet....keep working at it...it will come thru trial and error and lots of information and forum help...You will get there...

 

Bottomline ...Balance is getting your Bg's where you want them to be....and doing it by whatever way works for you....that's all there is to it.... Balance is Harmony between You and your Bg's- the ultimate goal of this Journey.....

 

Enjoy your Journey.....it's worth the trip... Life is Good...Clebo

 

P.S. I hate the word Diet.....this is not a diet people....it's not temporary...it's forever....so find a Lifestyle that works for you and you can be happy with the rest of your life....and just do it.... the rewards will come..... you won't be sorry!!

 

Nice sentiments and I don't wish to disagree with any of it. But, having said that, in "my" world, a diet which requires the injecting of a hormone (insulin) or swallowing of exotic chemicals (oral meds) in order to survive or have healthy BG numbers is not what I would call a "balanced" diet. It is inherently and by definition out of balance - out of balance with the reality of your body and its metabolism. At least in the case where there is another way to eat which brings the healthy results without the need for hormonal or chemical intervention.

 

So, kind of the OPPOSITE. If you're diabetic, what is usually called a "balanced" diet, e.g., 65% carbs, 15% protein and 20% fat is in nearly all cases certainly NOT in "balance". Rather, it is dangerously out of balance and potentially very harmful to your health. Lots of intervention will be required just to live healthily.

 

To me, the "balanced" diet is the one which gives health with zero intervention of if that is not possible, at least as little intervention as possible.

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Tribbles
Nice sentiments and I don't wish to disagree with any of it. But, having said that, in "my" world, a diet which requires the injecting of a hormone (insulin) or swallowing of exotic chemicals (oral meds) in order to survive or have healthy BG numbers is not what I would call a "balanced" diet.

Different people have different aims and hence their approaches are differ.

 

If I lost a limb I could get by without it with some difficulty, but it makes more sense to me to get a prosthetic limb. I could say I don't want artificial support because it detracts from me, and that is a valid view - just not one I would adopt. By extension I don't agree with the argument that says a diet that you could eat if your body was normal is not balanced because you have a deficiency. I was happy with my diet (mixed food groups, no highly refined foods, good quality ingredients,...) before diagnosis so I see no reason not to use insulin if that will maintain it.

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dturney
I've been following this thread with a certain amount of dread due to the sarcasm expressed by the OP, but finally have to make one comment. Don, evidently, uses insulin to help control his blood sugar, not diet and exercise alone, and not oral meds that can't be specifically targeted at carbohydrate intake. I did not notice acknowledgement of that component of his treatment program in his description of his own success. It's clear to me that reducing or eliminating starchy carbs and high-sugar foods like fruits is a boon to those diabetics who do not have the advantage of insulin at their disposal, and for insulin dependent diabetics who wish to minimize insulin intake.

 

There's certainly a wide range of metabolism represented among us and I've seen just about every nutritional position argued here. In my opinion, DF members offer the benefit of their experience quite generously. I am so grateful for the kindness I was shown when I first began posting, and for the wide range of experience that has been presented. I really hope that we can forego the sarcasm and derision in favor of constructive input.

 

Best,

Jen

 

Your attention is required at my signature...

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clebo
Nice sentiments and I don't wish to disagree with any of it. But, having said that, in "my" world, a diet which requires the injecting of a hormone (insulin) or swallowing of exotic chemicals (oral meds) in order to survive or have healthy BG numbers is not what I would call a "balanced" diet. It is inherently and by definition out of balance - out of balance with the reality of your body and its metabolism. At least in the case where there is another way to eat which brings the healthy results without the need for hormonal or chemical intervention.

 

So, kind of the OPPOSITE. If you're diabetic, what is usually called a "balanced" diet, e.g., 65% carbs, 15% protein and 20% fat is in nearly all cases certainly NOT in "balance". Rather, it is dangerously out of balance and potentially very harmful to your health. Lots of intervention will be required just to live healthily.

 

To me, the "balanced" diet is the one which gives health with zero intervention of if that is not possible, at least as little intervention as possible.

 

Hi Salim...I still believe that Balance is Harmony between Me and my Bg's....and by whatever means anyone of us take to get there...that's it in a nutshell...

 

Everyone has their own idea about Balance and what it means to them....you have found your's and I have found mine and a lot of Folks here have found their's.......in whatever context we define Balance for ourselves....

 

We all take the same Diabetes Journey,but go many different roads with the same great success in reaching our Bg goals and a better quality of life....

 

What works for you and me, will not work for everyone....we're all different..Again.....it doesn't matter what road you take ...just take the one that works for you and stay the course....that's all that matters..and I'm truly happy and inspired by everyone here for sharing their journey and the road they've taken, with all of us ,so we can learn from each other....

 

I will never accept a one-size fits all Solution to Diabetes....it's never gonna happen.. so find a Lifestyle you can live with the rest of your life and be happy and enjoy your journey.... Life is Good...Clebo

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samorgan

Exactly! And the concept of a "balanced diet" (as used by most) is precisely that "one size fits all" abomination that we need to stay away from IMO! It used to be right there in your signature as I recall, something to the effect of "No low-carb here" and "balance is key" So, you juxtaposed "low-carb" as being contrary to "balance".

 

That's the point I was trying to make. A more constructive use of the concept of "balance" would be (as I think we have now agreed on), that which maintains balance in your body and metabolism and which is in harmony with it. For many - especially many on this list - that may NOT mean eating "balance" from all food groups, whatever that is supposed to mean. Most who use the term that way would not consider my diet "balanced" but in this more meaningful sense, it absolutely is. Completely normal BG with no meds is proof positive of that.

 

As others have pointed out, you ARE on a low-carb diet (just not VLC), but if I'm understanding your numbers correctly, perhaps not low enough. Is BG-104 from 6/15 a fasting reading? If so, that is not yet within the normal range. I'd be concerned about that. What is your A1C?

 

 

Hi Salim...I still believe that Balance is Harmony between Me and my Bg's....and by whatever means anyone of us take to get there...that's it in a nutshell...

 

Everyone has their own idea about Balance and what it means to them....you have found your's and I have found mine and a lot of Folks here have found their's.......in whatever context we define Balance for ourselves....

 

We all take the same Diabetes Journey,but go many different roads with the same great success in reaching our Bg goals and a better quality of life....

 

What works for you and me, will not work for everyone....we're all different..Again.....it doesn't matter what road you take ...just take the one that works for you and stay the course....that's all that matters..and I'm truly happy and inspired by everyone here for sharing their journey and the road they've taken, with all of us ,so we can learn from each other....

 

I will never accept a one-size fits all Solution to Diabetes....it's never gonna happen.. so find a Lifestyle you can live with the rest of your life and be happy and enjoy your journey.... Life is Good...Clebo

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MrsMia

Yes, I agree with Salim's definition of "balanced" diet. I think it is wrong to use a term "healthy balanced diet" against those who low carb because it really means nothing. I know that the dairy/milk group is totally non essential for humans. Yet it is one listed as a food group. So I prefer the one that Salim has posted.

 

Also, Clebo, I believe you said that you do not take post prandial readings at all. If that is true, then do you actually know how the foods you are eating affect your bgs? My endo is more concerned with those post prandial numbers than fasting because he told me that almost everybody's numbers who are not on insulin will eventually fall.

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dturney
Nice sentiments and I don't wish to disagree with any of it. But, having said that, in "my" world, a diet which requires the injecting of a hormone (insulin) or swallowing of exotic chemicals (oral meds) in order to survive or have healthy BG numbers is not what I would call a "balanced" diet. It is inherently and by definition out of balance - out of balance with the reality of your body and its metabolism. At least in the case where there is another way to eat which brings the healthy results without the need for hormonal or chemical intervention.

 

So, kind of the OPPOSITE. If you're diabetic, what is usually called a "balanced" diet, e.g., 65% carbs, 15% protein and 20% fat is in nearly all cases certainly NOT in "balance". Rather, it is dangerously out of balance and potentially very harmful to your health. Lots of intervention will be required just to live healthily.

 

To me, the "balanced" diet is the one which gives health with zero intervention of if that is not possible, at least as little intervention as possible.

 

Samorgan, I hate to burst your bubble, however, you have that nasty harmone insulin zooming around in your body at the present time , if not nice knowing you.

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dturney

Hello Clebo, I agree diet???? I eat to my meter, and I eat out 7 days a week. Just me and the wife, so we find it cheaper to eat out. I pick meals that have all the food groups and enjoy.....this diease is a pain in the arss, but I certainly don't in tend to fret and cry over my deck of cards.....If I worried about all the woes that appear in the fourm I would have been dead 35 years ago. Just accept what you have and move on. If you wont some chocolate pudding ?? then have some ...diet....eveything in moderation.....LUTM don

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dturney

You are right about the old days. To check my BG I peed on a regent strip and read the color...green was good. Insulin was either beef or pork. most insulin strenghts were 40u per ml.....there was only one type of insulin.... and I could go on and on....by the way Nick I served in the Navy RM1(SS) eleven years 1956-67

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samorgan

If true and insulin is just a pure "aid" like the artificial limb with no downside that would all make sense. I'm not convinced that's true for T2s - just something you might want to keep your eye on. You see, a T1 who does not have insulin resistance only injects insulin up to "normal" levels - the same levels a non-diabetic would have and this solves the BG problem. For a T2 with insulin resistance, it takes an abnormal amount of insulin to accomplish the same BG control. This, of course, is what destroys the pancreas in the normal progression of T2. I don't doubt that elevated insulin is probably less harmful than elevated BG, but I'd prefer to have neither.

 

Potential harmful effects of insulin - especially in abnormally high amounts - are well known in scientific circles. Again, understanding the distinction between T1 and T2 on this issue is important IMO.

 

 

Different people have different aims and hence their approaches are differ.

 

If I lost a limb I could get by without it with some difficulty, but it makes more sense to me to get a prosthetic limb. I could say I don't want artificial support because it detracts from me, and that is a valid view - just not one I would adopt. By extension I don't agree with the argument that says a diet that you could eat if your body was normal is not balanced because you have a deficiency. I was happy with my diet (mixed food groups, no highly refined foods, good quality ingredients,...) before diagnosis so I see no reason not to use insulin if that will maintain it.

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samorgan

Don said:

 

Samorgan, I hate to burst your bubble, however, you have that nasty harmone insulin zooming around in your body at the present time, if not nice knowing you.

 

You've said this to me before on another forum and were corrected, so I guess you have either forgotten or you're just grandstanding and talking nonsense intentionally.

 

Did you ever see me suggest that I wanted to be insulin-free? Of course not. BUT, see my previous post regarding insulin levels and T2. Often, one of the first effects of T2 diabetes is ELEVATED INSULIN even before BG rises as insulin resistance has begun but the pancreas is still fully capable of dealing with it. It's usually all downhill from there. In the majority of cases this elevated insulin also causes obesity which is why T2 diabetes is highly correlated (not 100%) with obesity.

 

For a T2, maintaining NORMAL BG levels AND normal insulin levels is a good health goal. There is a very straightforward and easy way to do that and it is what I have chosen as my way of life.

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Tribbles
If true and insulin is just a pure "aid" like the artificial limb with no downside that would all make sense. I'm not convinced that's true for T2s - just something you might want to keep your eye on. You see, a T1 who does not have insulin resistance only injects insulin up to "normal" levels - the same levels a non-diabetic would have and this solves the BG problem. For a T2 with insulin resistance, it takes an abnormal amount of insulin to accomplish the same BG control. This, of course, is what destroys the pancreas in the normal progression of T2. I don't doubt that elevated insulin is probably less harmful than elevated BG, but I'd prefer to have neither.

 

Potential harmful effects of insulin - especially in abnormally high amounts - are well known in scientific circles. Again, understanding the distinction between T1 and T2 on this issue is important IMO.

That's my issue. I don't think there is such a clear cut difference between T1 and T2 in a lot of ways. I know several T1s who have insulin resistance, and likewise T2s like me who have minimal insulin resistance. My I:C and correction factors are average for a T1.

 

End of the day I have no problem with drugs if there are no side effects. Other people do and I respect that position. My aim in this whole thing is to manage my levels and to keep my A1c under 6.5 while making the fewest number of accommodations possible. I have always eaten in moderation (the USA was a bit of a culture shock in that regard!) and that seems to make watching carbs less critical.

 

I almost certainly could do better with some changes, but like dturney I would feel I was letting this thing run my life and I am not about to do this. My aim is to carry on as before with the minimum number of changes. That said, weight has never been an issue for me so the whole weight loss side has passed me by.

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Lysergic

I have to admit when I was diagnosed in Oct of 2010 I was nervous and so ignorant when it came to diabetes that I joined this forum to so that I could feel better. The place is a nice place to come and meet folks. I started doing some of things that people told me to do and cut out foods and that sorta thing...and i was starving..no whites I was told..so i followed the advice I got here and then next thing you know I drop 41 lbs. This was great news but I went to see my doctor she was happy that I lost weight but very concerned over the amount of weight and at such a short period of time, I told her that i was a member of this diabetes forum and I was reading posts from people to educate myself...She stopped me in my tracks and said...first of all you need to start eating more..Your a big man at 6'3 big framed...you cannot survive on 75 carbs a day...you need to start eating right and she gave me a list ..on that list was breads and rice and baked potatos...I was like...but...I thought that was forbidden...she said to me...no you can eat the same things that you used to eat just cut down on sugars...moderation is the key...next stop visiting that site.. lol. :D i was like..but why. :( there a nice people..shes like understand that with diabetes it affects people differently...the person that is telling what to eat is telling you what is right for THEM to eat...you need to be eating more...protein and good fat.

So i left there and ate a baked potato. :D

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Jillzd

It still comes down to carbs. Tribbles is right. You need to set your own goals as far as bs, a1c, etc. But balancing carbs is the key. Even people on insulin consider carbs. They can eat more because they can adjust and cover them. Some people need more meds/ some people choose more meds to limit changes in lifestyle. Some people are happy with higher numbers. But it still comes down to carbs and choices. You need to be informed to make those choices.

 

For new people, limiting carbs while they figure things out is good advice. (IMHO) Whether you hit them over the head or hit them softly, they still need to be told.

 

Lysergic, sounds like you aren't eating enough. Your doctor told you to eat more carbs. If you need to eat more, you can eat things other than carbs, too. What if you ate more of the protein, fats, and veggies? If you can handle a baked potato (wow, first of all) and your meter supports that, go for it. But most of us can't. But we also don't advocate starving yourself and losing weight that quickly. You really do need to find what works for you.

 

Everyone is different, but our world still centers around carbs.

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Tribbles

I suppose I should be clear here before people get the wrong idea. I usually end up around 180g per day which is maybe 50g less than prediagnosis (that is mostly down to stopping orange juice and regular soda) so I was never a huge carb eater. With insulin I have no problem at that level. Insulin also makes me very aware of what I eat because I have to calculate doses.

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NickP
I have to admit when I was diagnosed in Oct of 2010 I was nervous and so ignorant when it came to diabetes that I joined this forum to so that I could feel better. The place is a nice place to come and meet folks. I started doing some of things that people told me to do and cut out foods and that sorta thing...and i was starving..no whites I was told..so i followed the advice I got here and then next thing you know I drop 41 lbs. This was great news but I went to see my doctor she was happy that I lost weight but very concerned over the amount of weight and at such a short period of time, I told her that i was a member of this diabetes forum and I was reading posts from people to educate myself...She stopped me in my tracks and said...first of all you need to start eating more..Your a big man at 6'3 big framed...you cannot survive on 75 carbs a day...you need to start eating right and she gave me a list ..on that list was breads and rice and baked potatos...I was like...but...I thought that was forbidden...she said to me...no you can eat the same things that you used to eat just cut down on sugars...moderation is the key...next stop visiting that site.. lol. :D i was like..but why. :( there a nice people..shes like understand that with diabetes it affects people differently...the person that is telling what to eat is telling you what is right for THEM to eat...you need to be eating more...protein and good fat.

So i left there and ate a baked potato. :D

 

Wow...did losing that weight cause you to go below your ideal weight? Were you hungry when you were following low carb? Even the ADA agrees that a low carb diet is beneficical for weight loss.

 

You need to buy two copies of "GENOCIDE: How Your Doctor's Dietary Ignorance Will Kill You!" by Dr James Carlson. Read one copy and give the second to your Doctor.

 

Dr Bernstein would argue that 75 carbs a day is too many. A baked potoe has the same Glycenmic Index as Table Sugar. Your body sees and reacts to a baked potatoe the same way it reacts to a bottle of Coke. Get a copy of this book....if you read it and don't agree, send me a PM, I will buy it back from you.

 

You don't have to believe my advice, but be open and willing to learn more.

 

(and if you don't like that book, read Good Calories, Bad Calories by Gary Taubes, or Schwarzbein Principle by Dr Dana Schwarbein). Also, if you can, rent the Documentary Fat Head by Tom Naughton. It is very eye-opening and educational on how we get down with road with believing that Low Fat diet is healthy for us.....

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samorgan
I have to admit when I was diagnosed in Oct of 2010 I was nervous and so ignorant when it came to diabetes that I joined this forum to so that I could feel better. The place is a nice place to come and meet folks. I started doing some of things that people told me to do and cut out foods and that sorta thing...and i was starving..no whites I was told..so i followed the advice I got here and then next thing you know I drop 41 lbs. This was great news but I went to see my doctor she was happy that I lost weight but very concerned over the amount of weight and at such a short period of time, I told her that i was a member of this diabetes forum and I was reading posts from people to educate myself...She stopped me in my tracks and said...first of all you need to start eating more..Your a big man at 6'3 big framed...you cannot survive on 75 carbs a day...you need to start eating right and she gave me a list ..on that list was breads and rice and baked potatos...I was like...but...I thought that was forbidden...she said to me...no you can eat the same things that you used to eat just cut down on sugars...moderation is the key...next stop visiting that site.. lol. :D i was like..but why. :( there a nice people..shes like understand that with diabetes it affects people differently...the person that is telling what to eat is telling you what is right for THEM to eat...you need to be eating more...protein and good fat.

So i left there and ate a baked potato. :D

 

Yes, it sounds like eating more was good medical advice. BUT, what the good doctor didn't tell you is that the human dietary requirement for carbs (AND carb-containing foods) is:

 

ZERO

 

Not too many people actually pursue a zero-carb diet (I used to say "no one", but I actually found some the other day), but it is important to know the facts when making such important decisions.

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samorgan

Yes, comes down to carbs, but also proteins (since they also contribute to BG) and therefore also fats - since the three of them are all there is and thus form a zero-sum proposition. Best? Look at your overall diet in terms of percentages from these three macro-nutrients. Advantage? Once you find YOUR "balanced diet", you won't even need to test except rarely as long as you stick to it. Much easier! I'm doing it less and less. It's just not necessary.

 

 

It still comes down to carbs. Tribbles is right. You need to set your own goals as far as bs, a1c, etc. But balancing carbs is the key. Even people on insulin consider carbs. They can eat more because they can adjust and cover them. Some people need more meds/ some people choose more meds to limit changes in lifestyle. Some people are happy with higher numbers. But it still comes down to carbs and choices. You need to be informed to make those choices.

 

For new people, limiting carbs while they figure things out is good advice. (IMHO) Whether you hit them over the head or hit them softly, they still need to be told.

 

Lysergic, sounds like you aren't eating enough. Your doctor told you to eat more carbs. If you need to eat more, you can eat things other than carbs, too. What if you ate more of the protein, fats, and veggies? If you can handle a baked potato (wow, first of all) and your meter supports that, go for it. But most of us can't. But we also don't advocate starving yourself and losing weight that quickly. You really do need to find what works for you.

 

Everyone is different, but our world still centers around carbs.

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PinkRose

I've read pretty much all of the interesting posts in this thread and I don't think anyone has yet brought up the fact that the LC/HF diet that Bernstein & others advocate is also very High Protein (HP). Unless I'm mistaken, those who eat a HF diet must automatically eat a high amount of protein by default - right? If so, then I'd like to share my concern over this. I've been following the LC/HF/HP protein diet now for just over 6 months and in this time I've had 3 blood tests that show a very elevated amount of serum urea. My creatinine levels have thankfully remained the same & my eGFR is the same as well. However the skyrocketing urea level is now of great concern to me. My nephrologist advised that it shows my kidneys are stressed from the high protein consumption & is having some difficulty in metabolising it. I have been asked by my dietician & endo to discontinue eating such a low carb diet & introduce more low-GI carbs. This is a real dilemma for me.

 

I am a T1, so I don't know if kidney issues affect T1s more than T2s. However I do know that Bernstein is a T1 so I'm really confused about his dietary prescription. In general literature about diabetes, it seems to me that concerns about kidneys is not just confined to T1s but is shared by all diabetics. So I'm really interested in any feedback from those who check their kidney function or are concerned about their kidneys, how they have fared on the LC/HF/HP diet with regards to their kidneys. In my opinion, debate seems too focused on lipids & whether one's LDL is of the big particle size, etc. There is little mention about kidneys when discussing this diet.

 

I think I'm about to agree with DTurney about the merits of a more balanced diet based on my ongoing concerns. However I am being dragged & kicked into this position - I really do think low carbing is the way to go if you want good control. It's a pity that my kidneys don't seem to agree.

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A1C
Wow...did losing that weight cause you to go below your ideal weight? Were you hungry when you were following low carb? Even the ADA agrees that a low carb diet is beneficical for weight loss.

 

You need to buy two copies of "GENOCIDE: How Your Doctor's Dietary Ignorance Will Kill You!" by Dr James Carlson. Read one copy and give the second to your Doctor.

 

Dr Bernstein would argue that 75 carbs a day is too many. A baked potoe has the same Glycenmic Index as Table Sugar. Your body sees and reacts to a baked potatoe the same way it reacts to a bottle of Coke. Get a copy of this book....if you read it and don't agree, send me a PM, I will buy it back from you.

 

You don't have to believe my advice, but be open and willing to learn more.

 

(and if you don't like that book, read Good Calories, Bad Calories by Gary Taubes, or Schwarzbein Principle by Dr Dana Schwarbein). Also, if you can, rent the Documentary Fat Head by Tom Naughton. It is very eye-opening and educational on how we get down with road with believing that Low Fat diet is healthy for us.....

Thanks for the info. I will check both out.

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Jillzd
I've read pretty much all of the interesting posts in this thread and I don't think anyone has yet brought up the fact that the LC/HF diet that Bernstein & others advocate is also very High Protein (HP). Unless I'm mistaken, those who eat a HF diet must automatically eat a high amount of protein by default - right? If so, then I'd like to share my concern over this. I've been following the LC/HF/HP protein diet now for just over 6 months and in this time I've had 3 blood tests that show a very elevated amount of serum urea. My creatinine levels have thankfully remained the same & my eGFR is the same as well. However the skyrocketing urea level is now of great concern to me. My nephrologist advised that it shows my kidneys are stressed from the high protein consumption & is having some difficulty in metabolising it. I have been asked by my dietician & endo to discontinue eating such a low carb diet & introduce more low-GI carbs. This is a real dilemma for me.

 

I am a T1, so I don't know if kidney issues affect T1s more than T2s. However I do know that Bernstein is a T1 so I'm really confused about his dietary prescription. In general literature about diabetes, it seems to me that concerns about kidneys is not just confined to T1s but is shared by all diabetics. So I'm really interested in any feedback from those who check their kidney function or are concerned about their kidneys, how they have fared on the LC/HF/HP diet with regards to their kidneys. In my opinion, debate seems too focused on lipids & whether one's LDL is of the big particle size, etc. There is little mention about kidneys when discussing this diet.

 

I think I'm about to agree with DTurney about the merits of a more balanced diet based on my ongoing concerns. However I am being dragged & kicked into this position - I really do think low carbing is the way to go if you want good control. It's a pity that my kidneys don't seem to agree.

 

Pinkrose, you bring up a very good point. I've been on high bp meds for years, way before being dx. When I was dx, my dr changed my bp meds to Lisinopril to protetct my kidneys. I've lost quite a bit of weight and my bp is actually lower than I like at times now. We talked about dropping the bp meds, but he wants to decrease the dose and keep me on it if I can tolerate it without going too low because he wants the protection for my kidneys. I pulled out my bloodwork when I read your post just to make sure everything was still within range. I'm good so far, but if it ever gets to a point where my kidneys are affected, I will consider changing and eating a more moderate diet in a heartbeat even if it means more meds or even insulin. I'm sorry to hear that the lc diet has affected your kidneys. Do you know the percentage of protein in your diet? Can it be reversed if you eat a more moderate diet? I think YMMV is overused, but in this case it applies. You have to take your overall health into account when you decide on a diet. This is an yet another argument that the medical profession needs to give us better advice. If they discuss lc/hf diets with us, then maybe we can find the balance that includes not affecting kidneys.

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VeeJay
I've read pretty much all of the interesting posts in this thread and I don't think anyone has yet brought up the fact that the LC/HF diet that Bernstein & others advocate is also very High Protein (HP). Unless I'm mistaken, those who eat a HF diet must automatically eat a high amount of protein by default - right?

 

I have one of Bernstein's books and nowhere in it does he advise eating high protein. He advises moderate protein and high fat. And even suggests reducing protein if you need to lose weight.

 

High fat diet does NOT automatically mean high protein ("by default"). Fats are in many other foods besides meat. Cream, butter, fatty fruits like avocado and olive, good vegetable fats like olive oil and coconut oil.

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dturney
I've read pretty much all of the interesting posts in this thread and I don't think anyone has yet brought up the fact that the LC/HF diet that Bernstein & others advocate is also very High Protein (HP). Unless I'm mistaken, those who eat a HF diet must automatically eat a high amount of protein by default - right? If so, then I'd like to share my concern over this. I've been following the LC/HF/HP protein diet now for just over 6 months and in this time I've had 3 blood tests that show a very elevated amount of serum urea. My creatinine levels have thankfully remained the same & my eGFR is the same as well. However the skyrocketing urea level is now of great concern to me. My nephrologist advised that it shows my kidneys are stressed from the high protein consumption & is having some difficulty in metabolising it. I have been asked by my dietician & endo to discontinue eating such a low carb diet & introduce more low-GI carbs. This is a real dilemma for me.

 

I am a T1, so I don't know if kidney issues affect T1s more than T2s. However I do know that Bernstein is a T1 so I'm really confused about his dietary prescription. In general literature about diabetes, it seems to me that concerns about kidneys is not just confined to T1s but is shared by all diabetics. So I'm really interested in any feedback from those who check their kidney function or are concerned about their kidneys, how they have fared on the LC/HF/HP diet with regards to their kidneys. In my opinion, debate seems too focused on lipids & whether one's LDL is of the big particle size, etc. There is little mention about kidneys when discussing this diet.

 

I think I'm about to agree with DTurney about the merits of a more balanced diet based on my ongoing concerns. However I am being dragged & kicked into this position - I really do think low carbing is the way to go if you want good control. It's a pity that my kidneys don't seem to agree.

 

PinkRose , you are a smart lady....Don't be fooled by this fourm into eating fats to control your BG...It is not good for you in excess, just as all the food groups. A balance of all the food groups is the way to go, and the healthy way to go. I have know a lot of people who went on the HF/LC diet and it does help in your control, however, most of them, I can't talk to anymore.."I not allowed to say they died." If you are a a diabetic? Insulin is the way to go, and the healthy way...TC

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MrsMia
I've read pretty much all of the interesting posts in this thread and I don't think anyone has yet brought up the fact that the LC/HF diet that Bernstein & others advocate is also very High Protein (HP). Unless I'm mistaken, those who eat a HF diet must automatically eat a high amount of protein by default - right? If so, then I'd like to share my concern over this. I've been following the LC/HF/HP protein diet now for just over 6 months and in this time I've had 3 blood tests that show a very elevated amount of serum urea. My creatinine levels have thankfully remained the same & my eGFR is the same as well. However the skyrocketing urea level is now of great concern to me. My nephrologist advised that it shows my kidneys are stressed from the high protein consumption & is having some difficulty in metabolising it. I have been asked by my dietician & endo to discontinue eating such a low carb diet & introduce more low-GI carbs. This is a real dilemma for me.

 

I am a T1, so I don't know if kidney issues affect T1s more than T2s. However I do know that Bernstein is a T1 so I'm really confused about his dietary prescription. In general literature about diabetes, it seems to me that concerns about kidneys is not just confined to T1s but is shared by all diabetics. So I'm really interested in any feedback from those who check their kidney function or are concerned about their kidneys, how they have fared on the LC/HF/HP diet with regards to their kidneys. In my opinion, debate seems too focused on lipids & whether one's LDL is of the big particle size, etc. There is little mention about kidneys when discussing this diet.

 

I think I'm about to agree with DTurney about the merits of a more balanced diet based on my ongoing concerns. However I am being dragged & kicked into this position - I really do think low carbing is the way to go if you want good control. It's a pity that my kidneys don't seem to agree.

 

I really do not know of any responsible doctors or other low carbers advocating eating high protein along with high fat. I think you might want to check more into the position of what it means to be HF/LC.

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