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dturney

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MrsMia
PinkRose , you are a smart lady....Don't be fooled by this fourm into eating fats to control your BG...It is not good for you in excess, just as all the food groups. A balance of all the food groups is the way to go, and the healthy way to go. I have know a lot of people who went on the HF/LC diet and it does help in your control, however, most of them, I can't talk to anymore.."I not allowed to say they died." If you are a a diabetic? Insulin is the way to go, and the healthy way...TC

 

You do know that everybody dies, right? It's ridiculous to suggest that living HF/LC is what made them die.

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dturney
You do know that everybody dies, right? It's ridiculous to suggest that living HF/LC is what made them die.

 

A TIME TO BE BORN......A TIME TO LIVE....AND A TIME TO DIE....It is the time to live I am talking about you do have some control over that....Eating fat cuts that time..

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MrsMia
A TIME TO BE BORN......A TIME TO LIVE....AND A TIME TO DIE....It is the time to live I am talking about you do have some control over that....Eating fat cuts that time..

 

Really? Then PROVE it. Put up or shut up time once and for all.

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dturney

Depending on what you eat, a low-carb diet may be high in saturated fat and cholesterol. This can increase the risk of heart disease and perhaps some types of cancer. If you're limiting fruits, vegetables and whole-grain foods, you may not get enough fiber — which can contribute to constipation and other gastrointestinal problems.Ketosis — a condition caused by incomplete fat breakdown — also may be a concern with a low-carb diet. Ketosis can cause weakness, nausea, dehydration, dizziness and irritability.

 

Remember, the healthiest diet is based on fruits, vegetables, whole grains and lean sources of protein — not rigid lists of "good" and "bad" foods.

 

MAYO CLINIC

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MrsMia
Depending on what you eat, a low-carb diet may be high in saturated fat and cholesterol. This can increase the risk of heart disease and perhaps some types of cancer. If you're limiting fruits, vegetables and whole-grain foods, you may not get enough fiber — which can contribute to constipation and other gastrointestinal problems.Ketosis — a condition caused by incomplete fat breakdown — also may be a concern with a low-carb diet. Ketosis can cause weakness, nausea, dehydration, dizziness and irritability.

 

Remember, the healthiest diet is based on fruits, vegetables, whole grains and lean sources of protein — not rigid lists of "good" and "bad" foods.

 

MAYO CLINIC

 

This means absolutely nothing. Try again.

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ShottleBop

PinkRose, a low-carb/high-fat diet is NOT automatically one that is high in protein. In any event, if you check out Dr. Bernstein's book, The Diabetes Solution, or Dr. James Carlson's book Genocide--How Your Doctor's Dietary Ignorance Will Kill You, they will tell you that it is not protein that damages your kidneys, it is high blood pressure and high BGs that damage your kidneys to the point where they let protein through (protein is evidence of the damage, not the cause). (If you check the National Kidney Foundation website, they will tell you that the two most important things you can do to protect your kidneys are to control your blood pressure and your BGs.) Dr. Bernstein reports that he had severely compromised kidney function BEFORE he started low-carbing, and that, after developing and applying his method, he restored his kidney function to normal. (He did say, however, in this month's teleconference, that someone in final-stage kidney disease should probably avoid meat protein, and stick to fish.) This is an excerpt from his book:

[before he developed his method of controlling BGs:] I had begun testing my urine for protein and found substantial amounts of it, a sign, I had read, of advanced kidney disease. In those days—the middle and late 1960s—the life expectancy of a type 1 diabetic with proteinuria was five years. Back in engineering school, a classmate had told me how his nondiabetic sister had died of kidney disease. Before her death she had ballooned with retained water, and after I discovered my own proteinuria, I began to have nightmares of blowing up like a balloon. . . .

 

. . .

 

[After getting his BGs under control:]I started to gain weight, and at last I was able to build muscle as readily as nondiabetics. My insulin requirements dropped to about one-third of what they had been a year earlier. With the subsequent development of human insulin, my dosage dropped to less than onesixth of the original. The painful, slow-healing lumps the injections of large doses of insulin left under my skin disappeared. The fatty growths on my eyelids from high cholesterol vanished. My digestive problems (chronic burning in my chest and belching after meals) and the proteinuria that had so worried me eventually vanished. Today,my results from even the most sensitive kidney function tests are all normal.

 

Dr. B has been following his diet for nearly 40 years. He has treated thousands of patients. If his regime were killing off their kidneys, he wouldn't still be recommending it.

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NickP
I've read pretty much all of the interesting posts in this thread and I don't think anyone has yet brought up the fact that the LC/HF diet that Bernstein & others advocate is also very High Protein (HP). Unless I'm mistaken, those who eat a HF diet must automatically eat a high amount of protein by default - right? If so, then I'd like to share my concern over this. I've been following the LC/HF/HP protein diet now for just over 6 months and in this time I've had 3 blood tests that show a very elevated amount of serum urea. My creatinine levels have thankfully remained the same & my eGFR is the same as well. However the skyrocketing urea level is now of great concern to me. My nephrologist advised that it shows my kidneys are stressed from the high protein consumption & is having some difficulty in metabolising it. I have been asked by my dietician & endo to discontinue eating such a low carb diet & introduce more low-GI carbs. This is a real dilemma for me.

 

I am a T1, so I don't know if kidney issues affect T1s more than T2s. However I do know that Bernstein is a T1 so I'm really confused about his dietary prescription. In general literature about diabetes, it seems to me that concerns about kidneys is not just confined to T1s but is shared by all diabetics. So I'm really interested in any feedback from those who check their kidney function or are concerned about their kidneys, how they have fared on the LC/HF/HP diet with regards to their kidneys. In my opinion, debate seems too focused on lipids & whether one's LDL is of the big particle size, etc. There is little mention about kidneys when discussing this diet.

 

I think I'm about to agree with DTurney about the merits of a more balanced diet based on my ongoing concerns. However I am being dragged & kicked into this position - I really do think low carbing is the way to go if you want good control. It's a pity that my kidneys don't seem to agree.

 

The current HF/LC diet does not advocate a high amount of protein. Some folks, when they start a low carb diet, try to avoid fat and thus, eat a lot of low fat high protein meat (turkey breast, chicken breast) without adding fat to it. This is not recommended.

 

The conventional HF/MP/LC diet has about 10% carbs 15% Protein and 75% Fat. Some will even advocate a higher Fat count to put your Body into Ketosis. The amount of protein on a LC should be equal to what you had on Don's Balanced Diet or the USDA Food Pyramid. There is no change to the amount of protein in a Low Carb diet.

 

If you still have a fear of heart healthy fats, then a successful LC diet will be very difficult.

 

Also, just like no one would recommend that someone with a broken leg should be jogging because it is good for you -- if you have kidney issues, then you certainly do not want to eat extra protein.

 

However, if you have a healthy kidney, eating extra protein will not damage your kidneys, just like jogging will not hurt your legs if they are healthy.

 

The diet I am on is called a High Fat, Moderate Protein, and Low Carb. I probably eat more Protein than I should, but overall I do much better than anyone following the USDA "Balanced" Diet recommendation of 300 carbs/day.

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NickP
Depending on what you eat, a low-carb diet may be high in saturated fat and cholesterol. This can increase the risk of heart disease and perhaps some types of cancer. If you're limiting fruits, vegetables and whole-grain foods, you may not get enough fiber — which can contribute to constipation and other gastrointestinal problems.Ketosis — a condition caused by incomplete fat breakdown — also may be a concern with a low-carb diet. Ketosis can cause weakness, nausea, dehydration, dizziness and irritability.

 

Remember, the healthiest diet is based on fruits, vegetables, whole grains and lean sources of protein — not rigid lists of "good" and "bad" foods.

 

MAYO CLINIC

 

Come on Don! This is the best that you have? Quoting the conventional wisdom from an established medical center is not how I expected you to respond.

 

There have been billions of dollars of our taxpayer dollars spent on Medical Studies trying to prove Ansel Keys' defunct Lipid Hypothesis.

 

You can't quote one medical study that attempts to show elevated saturated fat is linked to heart disease????

 

I bet you can find one that has a flawed conclusion....and then we can really start debating the merits of the experiment and the results.

 

Let's keep the conversation civil and professional....but I would love to see what medical research actually proves this absurd notion that fat causes heart disease which is being pushed down our throats on a daily basis by the medical community.

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A1C
Let's keep the conversation civil and professional....but I would love to see what medical research actually proves this absurd notion that fat causes heart disease which is being pushed down our throats on a daily basis by the medical community.
Why are absurd notions accepted in the medical community?

 

Not to get off topic, but there are physicians who still use the BMI to gage whether or not a patient is at a healthy body weight. The BMI does not measure percentage of BF.

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NickP
Why are absurd notions accepted in the medical community?

 

Not to get off topic, but there are physicians who still use the BMI to gage whether or not a patient is at a healthy body weight. The BMI does not measure percentage of BF.

 

That is in interesting topic. If you pick up and read the book, "GENOCIDE: Why Your Doctor's Dietary Ignorance Will Kill You" by Dr James Carlson, you will understand this more thoroughly. It's a great read!

 

The bottom line is that there is a huge disconnect between what doctor's are taught in school on how a body works, and what Doctor's are taught to do in the field. Doctor's are not encourage to "think out of the box" but follow the perscribed method for any condition or ailment.

 

Dr Carlson gave an example in his book when his insurance compay called him and told him to stop telling his Diabetic patients to follow a low carb diet. Dr Carlson refused, and then his medical insurance company arrived at his office to audit the medical files of all of his diabetic patients. After seeing the positive results from Dr Carlson's work, the insurance company left and withdrew their request.

 

There are a lot of Doctor's who want to promote low carb, but are afraid to do so. Just look at this forum, the way that Low Carb people are attacked. You would think we were practicing animal sacrifices in our back yard the way many folks treat us.....

 

Seriously, pick up a copy of this book. It is a great read.

 

And yes...BMI is BS!

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samorgan

Not true. I eat approximately 15% of my calories from protein - 1% below the national average.

 

 

I've read pretty much all of the interesting posts in this thread and I don't think anyone has yet brought up the fact that the LC/HF diet that Bernstein & others advocate is also very High Protein (HP). Unless I'm mistaken, those who eat a HF diet must automatically eat a high amount of protein by default - right? If so, then I'd like to share my concern over this. I've been following the LC/HF/HP protein diet now for just over 6 months and in this time I've had 3 blood tests that show a very elevated amount of serum urea. My creatinine levels have thankfully remained the same & my eGFR is the same as well. However the skyrocketing urea level is now of great concern to me. My nephrologist advised that it shows my kidneys are stressed from the high protein consumption & is having some difficulty in metabolising it. I have been asked by my dietician & endo to discontinue eating such a low carb diet & introduce more low-GI carbs. This is a real dilemma for me.

 

I am a T1, so I don't know if kidney issues affect T1s more than T2s. However I do know that Bernstein is a T1 so I'm really confused about his dietary prescription. In general literature about diabetes, it seems to me that concerns about kidneys is not just confined to T1s but is shared by all diabetics. So I'm really interested in any feedback from those who check their kidney function or are concerned about their kidneys, how they have fared on the LC/HF/HP diet with regards to their kidneys. In my opinion, debate seems too focused on lipids & whether one's LDL is of the big particle size, etc. There is little mention about kidneys when discussing this diet.

 

I think I'm about to agree with DTurney about the merits of a more balanced diet based on my ongoing concerns. However I am being dragged & kicked into this position - I really do think low carbing is the way to go if you want good control. It's a pity that my kidneys don't seem to agree.

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samorgan

The only thing out of balance is your protein consumption. When you reduce carbs, you should replace them with fats, not proteins. That is why most of us have switched from calling it "low-carb" - which allowed too many people to make this mistake to LC/HF, hopefully more clear.

 

I, too, would worry about excessive protein consumption for the reasons you stated. Also, looking at indigenous human populations, every conceivable combination of carbs vs. fats can be found (although very low fat is mostly just a dangerous fad diet of the last 50 years or so), while there is much less variation in protein consumption.

 

This has absolutely nothing to do with the merits of LC/HF dieting, you have simply done it incorrectly.

 

I've read pretty much all of the interesting posts in this thread and I don't think anyone has yet brought up the fact that the LC/HF diet that Bernstein & others advocate is also very High Protein (HP). Unless I'm mistaken, those who eat a HF diet must automatically eat a high amount of protein by default - right? If so, then I'd like to share my concern over this. I've been following the LC/HF/HP protein diet now for just over 6 months and in this time I've had 3 blood tests that show a very elevated amount of serum urea. My creatinine levels have thankfully remained the same & my eGFR is the same as well. However the skyrocketing urea level is now of great concern to me. My nephrologist advised that it shows my kidneys are stressed from the high protein consumption & is having some difficulty in metabolising it. I have been asked by my dietician & endo to discontinue eating such a low carb diet & introduce more low-GI carbs. This is a real dilemma for me.

 

I am a T1, so I don't know if kidney issues affect T1s more than T2s. However I do know that Bernstein is a T1 so I'm really confused about his dietary prescription. In general literature about diabetes, it seems to me that concerns about kidneys is not just confined to T1s but is shared by all diabetics. So I'm really interested in any feedback from those who check their kidney function or are concerned about their kidneys, how they have fared on the LC/HF/HP diet with regards to their kidneys. In my opinion, debate seems too focused on lipids & whether one's LDL is of the big particle size, etc. There is little mention about kidneys when discussing this diet.

 

I think I'm about to agree with DTurney about the merits of a more balanced diet based on my ongoing concerns. However I am being dragged & kicked into this position - I really do think low carbing is the way to go if you want good control. It's a pity that my kidneys don't seem to agree.

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notme

 

There are a lot of Doctor's who want to promote low carb, but are afraid to do so. Just look at this forum, the way that Low Carb people are attacked. You would think we were practicing animal sacrifices in our back yard the way many folks treat us.....

 

 

I think more and more doctors are becoming aware of the low carb tendencies and are starting to support more testing of their patients blood to see if their low carb diets are actually successful. My doctor did a CRP test to see what inflammation I had and if I was at high risk for stroke. When it came back that there was no inflammation and I had a HDL of 106 he agreed that I should be doing what I am doing. The proof is in the low carb pudding. However, I totally disagree that people here are attacked for their low carb stance. There are some that are as vehement as you are about eating a balanced diet, however I think that is a far cry from an attack.

 

I know that everyone feels strongly about what they are doing when it comes to diet. However, there is a time when enough is enough and you say what you have to say without answering back to EVERY dissenting post. We all believe we are doing the right thing and we all believe it strongly or we wouldn't be posting and we wouldn't be here reading.

 

If I hear about Taubes, Richard Bernstein or Dr. Carlson one more time, I think I might scream too. And I definitely think there is something positive and true about low carb and .......moderate fat. I can't go the high fat way yet. I will keep reading anything new that is posted. But the rehash, I am sure to some, feels like an attack also.

 

Lets be mindful of what we have already said and leave some room for those that have questions or don't feel quite as strongly about your choices. I would hate for anyone to be afraid to post for fear that they will be pounded.

 

I have learned a lot on this site and respect each and every decision that someone makes for themselves. What I can't stand is when it becomes a personal argument or people feel disrespected because of their choice.

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jwags

I am another low carber that doesn't eat a lot of protein. I usually have some almond butter for breakfast on some scandanavian bran crackers. For lunch I may have a salad or leftovers from dinner, but usually only 2-3 ounces of protein or maybe some cheese. For dinner I will maybe have a small piece of chicken, steak or a burger, no more than 3 ounces. So I probably eat less protein than people on a high carb diet. Most of my 2300 calories a day come in fat. I'm not a big proponent of BMI but since low carbing my BMI is now under 20%. Also I've noticed the Body Fat I have carried in my belly and chest has melted away and now have a totally flat belly. My body looks like I have had plastic surgery but it is all the result of the low carb diet and the fat melting away. I do moderate exercise but nothing overwelming. I haven't done a sit up in over a year and get amazing results with this diet. I see lots of people exercising at the gym and then going out and eating high carb meals and they wonder why they are 40 pounds overweight. I never thought I would look the way I do at the age of 60, but my body has reversed the aging process. The only thing I can think of is the result of the LC/HF diet , especially the Coconut Oil.

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samorgan

Notme:

 

You've got me curious when you said:

 

"And I definitely think there is something positive and true about low carb and .......moderate fat. I can't go the high fat way yet."

 

As relates to the current discussion, it would seem from the above that you are eating a high-protein diet, right? Since there are only three macro-nutrients and you stated that you eat low-carb, moderate fat, doesn't that mean high-protein? Can you share what percentage of calories you get from protein on average?

 

I'm also curious about the word "yet". Does this mean you are considering swapping some of those proteins for fat?

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dturney
That is in interesting topic. If you pick up and read the book, "GENOCIDE: Why Your Doctor's Dietary Ignorance Will Kill You" by Dr James Carlson, you will understand this more thoroughly. It's a great read!

 

The bottom line is that there is a huge disconnect between what doctor's are taught in school on how a body works, and what Doctor's are taught to do in the field. Doctor's are not encourage to "think out of the box" but follow the perscribed method for any condition or ailment.

 

Dr Carlson gave an example in his book when his insurance compay called him and told him to stop telling his Diabetic patients to follow a low carb diet. Dr Carlson refused, and then his medical insurance company arrived at his office to audit the medical files of all of his diabetic patients. After seeing the positive results from Dr Carlson's work, the insurance company left and withdrew their request.

 

There are a lot of Doctor's who want to promote low carb, but are afraid to do so. Just look at this forum, the way that Low Carb people are attacked. You would think we were practicing animal sacrifices in our back yard the way many folks treat us.....

 

Seriously, pick up a copy of this book. It is a great read.

 

And yes...BMI is BS!

 

 

GENOCIDE: CRITIC AUDIO BOOKS... Carlson makes some appealing comments about how his colleagues are "indoctrinated" at medical schools. (He was similarly blinded during his schooling, but has since seen the light). Like tartuffe automatons, they do what they are trained to do, he says: barely listen and advocate a menu of prescription drugs and the wrong diet. Yes, sounds great, tell us about the evils of the doctors!

Then there's my other side, the writer's side, the critic side.

Carlson presents a possibly interesting biochemical and philosophical discussion of why the usual diets don't work and why his does — and why the medical field is so insensate -- in a most atrocious manner. It's in first person, which can be convincing if told from a modest, disenchanted viewpoint. But this book reads like sales copy. There's lots of which-I'll-get-to-later's and once-you-understand's and blah-blah-blah's and oh-yeah's and by-the-way's and all-caps declarations.

 

This guy is a HOOTER!!! TOOOTER!!!! I always thought BMI = Body Mass Index not BS

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notme
Notme:

 

You've got me curious when you said:

 

"And I definitely think there is something positive and true about low carb and .......moderate fat. I can't go the high fat way yet."

 

As relates to the current discussion, it would seem from the above that you are eating a high-protein diet, right? Since there are only three macro-nutrients and you stated that you eat low-carb, moderate fat, doesn't that mean high-protein? Can you share what percentage of calories you get from protein on average?

 

I'm also curious about the word "yet". Does this mean you are considering swapping some of those proteins for fat?

 

I say moderate fat because I can't stomach eating coconut oil out of the jar or in my food yet. I haven't figured out if it even is something I want to work on. Still mulling over the facts and reading. I am not a big meat eater, so I am not reducing carbs by eating a lot of proteins. I do eat proteins in the way of dairy protein, nuts and eggs. If you want the percentages, I am afraid I couldn't tell you. I am not as scientific about my diet as you are. I usually have a protein at every meal in some form. I eat a lot of plants and for whatever reason, I tolerate honey crisp apples with no problem.

 

Am I considering swapping out some of my foods for higher fat? Well, I bought a jar of coconut oil so I would have to say, I am thinking about trying. So far, I just can't stomach it. I am a Californian after all. :T

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NickP
GENOCIDE: CRITIC AUDIO BOOKS... Carlson makes some appealing comments about how his colleagues are "indoctrinated" at medical schools. (He was similarly blinded during his schooling, but has since seen the light). Like tartuffe automatons, they do what they are trained to do, he says: barely listen and advocate a menu of prescription drugs and the wrong diet. Yes, sounds great, tell us about the evils of the doctors!

Then there's my other side, the writer's side, the critic side.

Carlson presents a possibly interesting biochemical and philosophical discussion of why the usual diets don't work and why his does — and why the medical field is so insensate -- in a most atrocious manner. It's in first person, which can be convincing if told from a modest, disenchanted viewpoint. But this book reads like sales copy. There's lots of which-I'll-get-to-later's and once-you-understand's and blah-blah-blah's and oh-yeah's and by-the-way's and all-caps declarations.

 

This guy is a HOOTER!!! TOOOTER!!!! I always thought BMI = Body Mass Index not BS

 

I don't know how to respond to this in an intelligent and thoughtful manner.

 

I am still waiting for someone to post a medical study that shows that saturated fat is bad for your heart. Does anyone have that evidence?

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PinkRose

Thanks to everyone who addressed my concerns. So my assumption that a LC/HF diet does not necessarily mean high protein may not be correct, it seems. I haven't read Bernstein's classic work but from numerous forum posts I have read that he advocates essentially a diet that consists of meats, dairy products & vegetables. He does not consume any fruits or even nuts I believe (not sure where he stands on legumes).

 

For the past few months I have essentially followed the following diet:

 

Breakfast: eggs, tomatoes & cheese with coffee & organic soymilk with supplements.

Dinner: Protein with salad, vegetables, mayonnaise, cheese followed by coffee with lots of nuts.

 

The only carbs have been a piece of rye toast for breakfast & some croutons or crackers with my dinner. I think this has been a very LC diet & not a particularly high protein diet either.

 

I've managed to establish good BS control BUT I am now mildly anaemic with high levels of serum urea, as already discussed. I have also had persistent constipation in all this time, which I've never had before. So, I would have to say this diet has not been some miracle cure for me.

 

I am now instinctively craving fruit & more healthy complex carbs, in moderation of course, and I have started eating more of these foods now. I have noticed that as long as I am careful in matching correct boluses, I am not really experiencing great spikes. In fact the LC diet did not lead to a huge dramatic reduction in insulin requirements as I originally believed. Our BGs are determined it seems by different factors like hormones, liver activity, not just purely on the food we consume. These influences have remained the same irrespective of the diet being followed. I believe my insulin requirements as I introduce more healthy carbs into my diet will only increase by a modest amount (watch this space).

 

I also thank my lucky stars that I have normal functioning gall bladder that can tolerate a high level of fats. Because people with impaired gall bladder function or have had their g/b removed, simply would not be able to follow a LC/HF diet at all!!! Many people unfortunately do have this problem. Anyone who after eating a lot of fats, experiences nausea & weakness is probably in that category.

 

Any constructive comments on the above would be greatly appreciated.

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VeeJay
I also thank my lucky stars that I have normal functioning gall bladder that can tolerate a high level of fats. Because people with impaired gall bladder function or have had their g/b removed, simply would not be able to follow a LC/HF diet at all!!! Many people unfortunately do have this problem. Anyone who after eating a lot of fats, experiences nausea & weakness is probably in that category.

 

Many ARE able to tolerate the higher fat in the LC/HF diet - myself included. Probably I wouldn't have been able a year or two after my gall bladder was removed. But I don't have any problems with fats now.

 

I find I need more fiber in my diet now for regularity - I get this from vegetables and flaxmeal (in the form of yummy biscuits and muffins). I also eat a lot of avocados which are also a good fiber source.

 

I do understand that what works for a Type2 may not work exactly the same for a Type1. You have to do what works for you.

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Tribbles
I also thank my lucky stars that I have normal functioning gall bladder that can tolerate a high level of fats. Because people with impaired gall bladder function or have had their g/b removed, simply would not be able to follow a LC/HF diet at all!!! Many people unfortunately do have this problem. Anyone who after eating a lot of fats, experiences nausea & weakness is probably in that category.

I don't have a gall bladder and eating a lot of fat definitely upsets my stomach, metformin has nothing on it! That said, I can't tolerate metformin either for the same reason.

 

This does raise an interesting and unrelated question. I wonder how the incidence of gall bladder disease correlates to Type 2 diabetes since weight, age, and rapid weight loss are all indicators.

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dturney
I don't know how to respond to this in an intelligent and thoughtful manner.

 

I am still waiting for someone to post a medical study that shows that saturated fat is bad for your heart. Does anyone have that evidence?

 

 

 

 

Researchers from the Heart Research Institute in Australia studied the body response from eating meals containing good fats versus bad fats. Participants were fed with meals prepared with either coconut oil (high in "bad" saturated fats) or safflower oil (high in "good" polyunsaturated fats). After only 3 hours, researchers found the participants fed with the coconut meal high in saturated fat had a significantly reduced blood flow due to arteries' reduced ability to expand. After 6 hours, researchers found that the good high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol's anti-inflammatory properties had decreased after the saturated coconut meal, but improved after the polyunsaturated safflower meal. The results of this study were published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology . This study once again shows how good fats may improve body functions while bad fats hamper our health. Despite its extreme high level of saturated fat, coconut oil supporters have been promoting coconut oil as a health food. They claimed that coconut oil can cause weight loss, lower blood cholesterol, and is a germ fighter. It is true the structure of some of the saturated fats in coconut oil is different from other saturated fats, but it is scientifically farfetched to claim it as health food to be eaten every day. Like any other foods, moderation is the key.

Saturated fats are mainly found in animal products such as meat, dairy, eggs and seafood. Some plant foods are also high in saturated fats such as coconut, palm oil and palm kernel oil. Although this study is small, it showed that just one "bad" meal can do damage.

Bottom Line

 

 

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute warned that "a high content of saturated fat... found in ..... palm kernel oil, palm oil, coconut oil and cocoa butter" put people at risk for having heart attack or stroke.

For the sake of your heart, minimize the intake of both saturated fats and trans fats. Choose wholesome fresh foods instead of packaged foods, which usually contain these bad fats.

Avoid using cooking oils that are high in saturated fats and trans fats such as coconut oil, palm oil or vegetable shortening. Instead, use oils that are low in saturated fats and high in mono- and polyunsaturated fats such as canola oil, olive oil and safflower oil.

As saturated fats are found in animals products, choose lower-fat version dairy. In addition, trim visible fats and skins from meat products.

 

 

 

Just one in millions Nickp>

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ShottleBop

And yet, from the the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition:

 

Results: During 5–23 y of follow-up of 347,747 subjects, 11,006 developed CHD or stroke. Intake of saturated fat was not associated with an increased risk of CHD, stroke, or CVD. The pooled relative risk estimates that compared extreme quantiles of saturated fat intake were 1.07 (95% CI: 0.96, 1.19; P = 0.22) for CHD, 0.81 (95% CI: 0.62, 1.05; P = 0.11) for stroke, and 1.00 (95% CI: 0.89, 1.11; P = 0.95) for CVD. Consideration of age, sex, and study quality did not change the results.

 

Conclusions: A meta-analysis of prospective epidemiologic studies showed that there is no significant evidence for concluding that dietary saturated fat is associated with an increased risk of CHD or CVD. More data are needed to elucidate whether CVD risks are likely to be influenced by the specific nutrients used to replace saturated fat.

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