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dd2collin

victoza

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sweetstar

I was looking for some info,also. My doctor discussed it with me today as an alternative. She was saying that it helps with lowering appetite and helps to lose weight.

I was hoping someone with experience using it would post.

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trowter

I have been on Victoza since Feb/10/2011. For me, it is working very well...I didn't even need to go up to the 1.2 dose....6 does the trick for me. Fasting BG's went from low 6's to the high 4's overnight. Within 2 weeks, my doctor had to cut back my metformin from 1500 to 500 per day.

I am one of the lucky ones, who hasn't suffered from any major nausea since starting it. The first week I felt a little blah, but nothing that interfered with my day to day activities.

I have lost 17 pounds in 5 weeks...its hard to explain, but my brain seems to have turned off my appetite. When I do eat, I get full really quickly, and go from he "full" feeling to "overfull" with eating considerably less than I am used to.

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sweetstar

Thanks Trowter. How do you deliver the med, is it with a pen or an injection?

Is it as painless as the doctor said?

 

My doctor did say that Januvia is the pill form of victroza but has some different affects.

I feel that suppressed appetite and don't want to eat after eating just small portions.

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MandyM

I have been on it for about 4 weeks and really love it. It helps control my sugar and my appetite! I was really nauseous for the first couple of weeks, but it wore off. Now....funny thing...is that I sometimes get these giant welts at the injection site. It usually welts up 30 hours after my injection....and stays for days. It doesn't happen every time...just about every other time. Anyone have tips on how to fix this? I'd really like to stay on the medication.

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dd2collin

I have been on it about a month and a half, I don't trust my scale I just go by the Dr's and I have lost 11 lbs.

No one was as surprised as i was, there are times I am sick to my stomach and feel yucky, but I take several medications that could do that, so I am not really complaining.

I am staying with it, my Dr, was very excited about the weight loss, I was just in shock..

Hope that helps...

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Cormac_Doyle

Victoza is an injection, delivered by the same type of pen as insulin.

 

It is delivered as a single injection per day (compare this to Byetta which is injected at least twice a day).

 

For the majority of people, tt is very effective and has very few side effects. Some people find that it has no beneficial effect; often, those same people also report more noticable side effects.

 

Be aware that like any medication, it will only be effective if it's mode of action is what is required for your body.

 

For me, it has had no side effects, and has actually reduced the side effects I have had from the Metformin I take. It has also dramatically reduced the other medications I have to take (both the Statin and the Insulin). However, I do know other people who found it had no beneficial effect, and significant side effects. As always - YMMV.

 

Don't compare Januvia with Victoza/Byetta. All three act within the "Incretin" pathways, but they do so at different points, and thus will have different results and different side effects. Broadly, they can all be considered Incretin mimetics, but you may want to read up on the area before assuming that they should be considered similar ...

 

Incretins are insulin secretagogues (e.g. - they encourage the release of Insulin). The two main candidate molecules that fulfill criteria for being an incretin are Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) and Gastric Inhibitory Peptide (glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide, GIP). Both GLP-1 and GIP are rapidly inactivated by the enzyme Di-Peptidyl Peptidase-4 (DPP-4).

 

Januvia is an DPP-4 inhibitor (e.g. it slows the breakdown of naturally circulating GLP-1 and GIP.

Byetta & Victoza are GLP-1 agonists (An agonist is a chemical that binds to a receptor of a cell and triggers a response by that cell. Agonists often mimic the action of a naturally occurring substance. Thus a GLP-1 agonist is a chemical that binds to the GLP-1 receptor, mimicing the activity of the hormone GLP-1).

=> In theory, it would be possible to administer BOTH Januvia and Byetta ...

 

More details below:

 

Glucagon-like peptide analogs and agonists

 

Glucagon-like peptide (GLP) agonists bind to a membrane GLP receptor. As a consequence, insulin release from the pancreatic beta cells is increased. Endogenous GLP has a half life of only a few minutes, thus an analogue of GLP would not be practical.

 

* Exenatide (also Exendin-4, marketed as Byetta) is the first GLP-1 agonist approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Exenatide is not an analogue of GLP, but rather a GLP agonist. Exenatide has only 53% homology with GLP, which increases its resistance to degradation by DPP-4 and extends its half-life. Typical reductions in A1C values are 0.5-1.0%.

* Liraglutide, a once daily human analogue (97% homology), is being developed by Novo Nordisk under the brand name Victoza. The product was approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) on July 3, 2009, and by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on January 25, 2010.

 

These agents may also cause a decrease in gastric motility, responsible for the common side effect of nausea, and is probably the mechanism by which weight loss occurs.

 

Gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP) analogs/agonists

- none currently available

 

DPP-4 Inhibitors

Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (also known as glyptins) increase blood concentration of the incretin GLP-1 by inhibiting its degradation by dipeptidyl peptidase-4.

 

When comparing GLP-1 analogues to DPP-4 inhibitors, the following observations have been made:

- DPP-4 inhibitors lowered average hemoglobin A1C values by 0.74% (GLP-1 inhibitors lowered average HbA1c values by a similar value).

- GLP-1 analogs resulted in weight loss but had more gastrointestinal side effects

- DPP-4 inhibitors were generally weight neutral but had increased risk for infection and headache

 

Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors increase blood concentration of the incretin GLP-1 by inhibiting its degradation by dipeptidyl peptidase-4.

 

Examples are:

 

* vildagliptin (Galvus) EU Approved 2008

* sitagliptin (Januvia) FDA approved Oct 2006

* saxagliptin (Onglyza) FDA Approved July 2009

 

 

Final Note

GLP-1 (and it's agonists) ONLY bind to the GLP-1 receptor in the presence of circulating Blood glucose. Thus when the levels of circulating blood glucose are low, the presence of GLP-1 or GLP-1 agonists will NOT trigger the release of insulin.

When blood sugar begins to rise, GLP-1 will bind to the GLP-1 receptors, triggering the release of insulin

 

Consequently, GLP-1 agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors should not cause Hypoglycaemia unless taken with exogenous insulin or Sulphonylureas ...

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Cormac_Doyle

Forgot to mention; in addition to increasing insulin release ... GLP1-agonists also reduce glucagon secretion ...

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trowter
Thanks Trowter. How do you deliver the med, is it with a pen or an injection?

Is it as painless as the doctor said?

 

My doctor did say that Januvia is the pill form of victroza but has some different affects.

I feel that suppressed appetite and don't want to eat after eating just small portions.

 

Hi Sweetstar,

The Victoza comes in a pen...for the most part, yes, it is painless. Once in a while, I'll feel it, but that is few and far between, and I find the the lancet to test my sugar hurts more than the Victoza. I think the worst thing I have encountered was getting up the courage the first time, to put the needle in...took me 25 minutes...just about gave myself an anxiety attack, only to get it done, and there be NO pain whatsoever...couldn't even feel it. lol

Unfortunately, I can't comment on the Januvia...I was on only metformin before starting the Victoza.

Like some others have said, it doesn't work for everyone, but for those that it does, it is wonderful. I think it's worth giving it a try. Even if you do have the nausea, it usually goes away with time, you just have to grin and bear it for the greater cause.

Good Luck!!! I hope it goes well for you.

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dd2collin

I am really liking the victoza, but I am thinkling i might need to come back down to the 0.6 or 1.2 dose, yesterday I had brunch @ about 12, and about 2 took my victoza, and did not want to eat, till this morning.

Believe me for me this is really something.

I was just sick to my stomach and the thought of food, was not appetizing.

That may not be appealing to someone who has control over their eating, but to me it is giving me more control...I ate a banana just to have something, but trully was not hungry.

Hope this helps, I am going to another Dr today, so I am anxious to see the scale reading.:o

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LuckyArmpit

I also take victoza. Have been on it for almost 4 weeks. Started out with .6 the first week, then 1.2 the 2nd week and now am at 1.8. I take it in the morning as soon as I get out of shower. Have never felt nauseated once. Like they say, my appetite has dropped. Haven't weighed myself but I do feel a little thinner.

The injections are nothing. I feel no pain at all! Bing bing and your done! I also take metformin and glipizide ER tabs daily. Actually, I may need to decrease the dosage as I have had low blood sugar readings a few times in the past 6 days.

So far, no ill effects. Just one area in my belly turned a little bruised where I injected. But I move it around every morning so I don't inject in the same place all the time.

 

Lucky...

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Luvbuges

Hello All,

 

I have been a diabetic for a few years. Just recently got my sugars under control however, have not been able to lose weight properly and my dr thinks it's because of the insulin. So she decided to prescribe Victoza to me to help me lose the weight and after reading your comments I am actually very excited about it. I will be using the insulin and victoza together just have to pay close attention to my numbers hoping by the next time i see her i will be down about 20 - 30 lbs...

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smsgt178

Hi Everyone,

 

I've been a Type 2 diabetic since 1995. Started out on low doses of Glucophage. Later added Amaryl. Morning readings were getting higher >200, so Dr. added Lantus insulin once-a-day. Changed to an Endo last year and he kept me on 2000mg Glucophage XR, stopped my Lantus & Amaryl, and started me on Byetta. I took Byetta 5 for two months, then moved up to Byetta 10. Started out having the normal Byetta side affects of slight nausea and stomach discomfort, but my A1C's were running in the mid-6s with morning readings around 110. Problem started early this spring, when I started having severe nausea with occasional vomiting and bad stomach pains. After several attempts to regulate Byetta side affects, my Endo took me off Byetta last week and has started me on Victoza (along with the 2000mg Glucophage XR daily). So far I have not had any side affects, but it is not keeping my readings down. I started out at 0.6 per day and moved up to 1.2 per day three days later. Morning readings are over 200, with 3 hours after meal readings running 180-240. I really want the Victoza to work and like having no side affects, but I can't continue having readings this high. Endo wants me to wait another week before moving up to the maximum dose of 1.8, but in all the forums I've found most everyone started having good results even with the low starting 0.6 dose. Has anyone experienced my situation? Anyone with any sugestions?

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Cormac_Doyle

I'm surprised you are still on 1.2mg ... my doc did 1 week at 0.6, 1 week and 1.2 and then stayed at 1.8 after that (considering going to 2.4 now ...). The main reasons for startng low and building up is to avoid the side effects ... but Victoza typically has much fewer than Byetta.

 

For some people, Victoza and Byetta simply don't work, but if they do, it's generally very effective once you get to the 1.8 or 2.4 dosage ...

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CALynn

Hi,

 

I'm about 60 pounds overweight and recently with the additon of Spiriva [for COPD] and Humira [for autoimmune arthritis] my fasting BG jumped to about 118 in the AM. Used to be 6.0 to 6.1 A1C before starting these drugs but am now at 6.5.

 

I tried Metformin twice, each for about a year, and frankly didn't not like the side effects, so weaned off it.

 

 

My doctor seems to want me to try the Victoza so am weighing this drug versus other possibilities.

 

I am terrible about eating regularly. I rarely have anything for breakfast - almost have to force myself to drink an ATkins shake. Lunch is iffy - mostly I am too busy and don't eat. But come dinner time I'm famished and easily consume 800 calories and a bunch of carbs in one meal and after meal snack.

 

Do you think Victoza would work for this type of eating? When would I inject the Victoza?

 

[And no, I don't see myself ever adapting to smaller meals spread through the day.....tried that once and I gained too much weight.]

 

Thanks in advance for your replies.

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art

Victoza is injected in the morning.

For some it is an incredible appetite suppressant.

YYou'll eat like a bird and won't be hungary.

 

Check with your insurance company if they cover it. It's pretty new on the market and not all plans pay. It can be VERY expensive.

 

Didn't do a thing for me though.

 

Give it a try.

 

 

Art

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maureen4949

I have been on Victoza twice, tried it a year ago and it did not work at all, however my readings were pretty hight to begin with. Went back to the Byetta. This last February the doc and I decided to try it again. Seemed fine for a couple of weeks but then the after meals numbers were extremely high again, 200 to high 300 range. Unfortunately I had to stop it again and went back to the Byetta. At this time the doc and I discussing the possible use of insulin which I have mixed feelings about.

 

I do know a few people personally that are doing extremely well on Victoza, just wished it worked with me... Good luck!

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bsnelson

I've been taking Victoza at 1.8/day for probably a year or more, but I have a different problem: Cost. Insurance pays 70%, but even that 30% is putting the squeeze on the finances. Has anyone had good results with half or partial doses, particularly if you were previously at the full 1.8? Obviously, I could just try it, and my doctor and I discussed it, but I'd just like to see of there are any anecdotal reports before doing so.

 

If it's germane, here are my other daily meds:

 

2000mg metformin

2.5mg glyburide

26 units Levemir (at night)

 

Fasting numbers are 80-100, occasional 110, last A1C was 5.7. Obviously, I'm wary of making changes with numbers this good, but the financials make me want to try.

 

Thanks in advance,

 

Brad

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Bountyman

I'm shooting from the hip, here, but if you find yourself forced to cut your dosage of Victoza in half and your numbers start to rise (slightly) you might consider splitting your Levemir dosage to twice a day.

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trowter

I feel your pain when it comes to the cost of Victoza. My insurance only pays 60%, which works out to $66 out of pocket for me per month.

I have not been on the 1.8 dose, so I am unable to comment from that point of view. I have been on the 1.2 dose for about 4 months now. My morning numbers range are usually between 4 (72) - 5 (90) in the morning, and my post meals are always under 7 (125). Along with the Victoza, I take 250g of metformin in the morning. Just yesterday, the doctor asked me to stop the last bit of metformin I am taking to see how I'll do. I have lost 68 lbs since I started to take Victoza, so the doctor wants to see if I can keep my numbers in line without the metformin...kind of a fun experiment for my doctor.

 

I thought I better mention too that my diet is moderate carb. I try to keep it under 50g per meal...

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tas3977

Started Vic 5/10, about 7/20/10 got violently sick. Blamed it on food poisoning.(lasted 3 days). went back on Vic. 2 weeks later same thing. Talked to Doc, told him I was going on a cruise. He said go back to Byetta. Worked fine. 2 monthes later he wanted me to go back to Vic with smaller dose (1.2). Worked great for 3 monthes then sick again. Back on Byet, staying with it till they come out with 1@week. No side effects from Byetta.

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Redawa

I was diagnosed Type II Diabetic 7 years ago. Not many of the drug programs I have had, receive a glowing success but with Victoza I can confirm a positive reaction. Weight loss has been as dramatic as the weight gain from Actos. No physical effects like Metformin - diarrhea, Avandia - heart attacks and surgery, Januvia - constant vomiting, Actos - rapid weight gain. Some would say I am a poster-boy for the next new drug from either my family doctor or our local diabetes clinic. The cost is an issue with only 50% covered by insurance but hopefully the less food I buy will compensate for the losses. Unfortunately the key in my diabetes is a genetic weakness as all my siblings and cousins are Type I or Type II diabetics and our parents were 50 % Type II on one side of the family tree. You try to dodge the bullet but you can't dodge family.

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SunnyD
I have been on Victoza since Feb/10/2011. For me, it is working very well...I didn't even need to go up to the 1.2 dose....6 does the trick for me. Fasting BG's went from low 6's to the high 4's overnight. Within 2 weeks, my doctor had to cut back my metformin from 1500 to 500 per day.

I am one of the lucky ones, who hasn't suffered from any major nausea since starting it. The first week I felt a little blah, but nothing that interfered with my day to day activities.

I have lost 17 pounds in 5 weeks...its hard to explain, but my brain seems to have turned off my appetite. When I do eat, I get full really quickly, and go from he "full" feeling to "overfull" with eating considerably less than I am used to.

 

I've been on Victoza for about 6 weeks now! I thought the .6 worked better for me too. I am now on 1.8 . . . just started that about 2 days ago. Since I've been on Victoza, I've lost about 15 pounds. I don't know if it's the Victoza or the metformin, but it makes me nauseous and sometimes I throw up. I think it depends on what I eat. I'm also extremely tired and my sense of smell has heightened (which I think is what makes me sick). The side effects from Victoza would go away after my system got used to. But everytime I upped the dosage I would have to deal with the side effects all over again.

 

Anyway, I went to a conference and the manufaturers of Victoza was there and we had a lengthy discussion. They encouraged me to stick with it and I will. I think most of my problems stem with the Metformin. I have never been able to handle it well, which is why I'm on the Victoza now (my sugar levels skyrocketed) because I kept taking myself on and off the Metformin.

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Leonard Garcia

I tried Byetta a year ago. After using it for 3 months, it "quit working" for me (maybe there is a better definition than 'quit working') and since I had discontinued insulin, I had to scramble to get a new prescription and get insulin. Later I tried Victoza. I lost over 20 lbs and was very happy (no side effects). But, like Byetta, it stopped working. Now I am sticking with plain insulin until a proven substitute appears...

 

Leonard

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