Jump to content
Diabetes forums
  • Welcome To Diabetes Forums!

    Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today to contribute and support the site.

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

WantHealth

need help/insight/suggestions with my low carb lifestyle

Recommended Posts

WantHealth

Hello folks,

I've been low-carbing for a few months now. The past 2 months I've been very low -- shooting for less than 35 g per day.

 

In the beginning, this diet was reasonably easy. I was excited to eat so many foods that I had been avoiding for years. Suddenly scrambled eggs and bacon were a treat! Baby back ribs were something to look forward to...avocados...cheese...nuts...butter...roasted chicken with skin....it was all so wonderful at the start.

 

But suddenly, the past 2 weeks, all my food choices seem intolerable. I literally feel nauseous at the though of eating another piece of meat or cheese and I haven't been able to eat eggs for about 1 month. I know I need to eat more vegetables so I have been including more in my diet. I've enjoyed a lot of asparagus, cauliflower, broccoli, zucchini and salads lately. Inceasing my veggie intake has helped a little bit.

 

I'm wondering (hoping/praying) if this is a normal phase that will soon pass? I literally don't want to eat much anymore and it's slowing my metabolism. It's not that I'm craving carbs; because I really don't want to eat something really carby or sugary but I have needed to have Atkins protein shakes for breakfast because I need the sugary taste and can't fathom a bacon/eggs type breakfast these days.

 

Anyway, just looking for advice or some sort of solidarity. Is this a normal reaction after about 2 months on a high protein/fat - low carb diet?

 

The things I'm missing most aren't the usual suspects. I'd love some refriend beans or beans in general (black beans, kidney beans, chick peas, hummus, etc). I would also love to have an apple. It's not like I'm craving waffles with syrup or cupcakes so much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sumi

Most of us do get tired of it after a time. As you are prediabetic, it should be fine for you to add more carbs. I often eat chile (meat, beans , tomatoes ,onions etc) or spaghetti using dreamfields pasta. A quick breakfast might be some cheese and 1/2 a sliced apple, I have eaten hummus with low carb tortillas without a problem. Greek yogurt with 1/2 cup of blueberries is a common snack for me. Once I got my glucose levels under control, I found that having a few more carbs worked fine. In my case it was about eight months of being pretty strict before I could relax a little, but I did start off pretty high.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
VeeJay

My food likes seem to cycle - I'll enjoy certain foods and eat them a lot, and then after a while find I don't want them anymore. Move on to something else - and the same thing happens. After a few "rotations" I'm back to enjoying the original foods again.

 

But, then, I've always liked variety in all aspects of my life, including my food, so this behavior isn't unexpected.

 

I, too, found that after a time of very low carbing I could have just a bit more now and then, and will eat 1/4 an apple, a few berries, a quarter cup of beans, etc., which I didn't eat at all at first.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jwags

I think we all cycle through different foods for awhile, then we get creative and find something else. I find I need to make my own lower carb subs for waffles, pancakes, cookie, bread, etc. I use coconut flour, almond meal, flaxseed or other nut meals. Check out a lot of the online forums for new recipes. One of my favorite is Linda's Low Carb Menus & Recipes - Home

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
shyam

What are your numbers like ? It wouldn't be a bad idea to rotate your diet as others have put it. Besides IMHO legumes and certain beans are good choices. So go ahead and treat yourself once in a while.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WantHealth
What are your numbers like ? It wouldn't be a bad idea to rotate your diet as others have put it. Besides IMHO legumes and certain beans are good choices. So go ahead and treat yourself once in a while.

 

My numbers are good all day except for in the morning (dawn phenomenon) when I awake to between 110-120 after fasting for 12+ hrs.

 

Before meals I'm usually in the high 80's-mid 90's and after meals I don't usually go over 110. But this is from being very carb restrictive. I'm nervous about adding more carbs but maybe I could try some beans and an apple here and there, then test and see how it's going. I had Dreamfields pasta last week and I stayed under 130 (127, 90 mins after meal). All this meat and cheese is really getting to me. I wouldn't have believed it at the start but I am just so sick of it; to the point that I'd rather skip meals than eat more meat & veg. And I know something is off with my metabolism because weight loss has halted even though I'm barely eating these days.

 

This eve for dinner I had poached salmon which was a nice change of pace. Not nauseous at all :)

 

The weird thing is that I was never a fruit eater. Never in my life. I literally ate fruit 2-3x per month. But suddenly I'm craving black cherries, strawberries, nectarines and the thought of jam is like heaven. I think I should just eat some, get it over with, check my numbers and move on...

 

At least the high fructose corn syrup type stuff isn't a problem - I don't want sweets and pastry treats. I still avoid bread, potatoes and the like with ease. I know from checking my numbers that bread is the kiss of death for me, so that makes it utterly unappealing, like poison.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
samorgan

From my experience, maybe you just don't need to eat so much. I have been eating LC/HF for almost two years and it still amazes me sometimes how little I need to eat. When food seems disgusting and you'd rather just not eat it - why not? Try just not eating it, even if that means skipping an entire meal.

 

In my experience, things are really different once you cut the carbs. When you are eating lots of carbs, skipping a meal can make you groggy and even give you a headache. After adjusting to LC/HF, that becomes a thing of the past. I can skip an entire meal and barely notice it. Don't be afraid to just not eat anything when that's the way you feel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Larry H.

Personally I have never believed in total abstinence or highly limited carbs. I have found all kinds of ways to enjoy a meal and stay low carb without giving up everything I ever enjoyed. To me that is a recipe for failure eventually.

 

I keep my carbs to a medium amount usually. I have a high fiber cereal that amounts to about 12 carbs per serving. I have that with some blueberries, sprinkled with some walnut pieces and a few raisins for breakfast. Usually my two hour number comes in lower than my wake up with that which tends to be near 100 most days, lower some lately.

 

For lunch I like the Low Carb Health Bread with 5 or 7 carbs per slice. That is only 10 to 14 and I have either turkey or peanut butter, and no sugar jelly. Sometimes I have sardines on it for a change. I eat some no fat chips and a few regular ones. We always have either a half a sliced apple or some grapes or pear. For desert normally I have a 4 carb serving of byers or schwann ice cream. Depending on my activity that can run from 115 to 130.

 

For supper we have a half a baked potato sometimes, often meat or cheese dishes with vegetables, low carb ice cream or no fat no sugar pudding with a dap of no sugar cool whip. Other meals vary from time to time. Generally I try to know what I am eating and how it effects me. I personally don't do well with beans or rice in meals and stay mostly away from them.

 

Main thing is look at the labels or google the item to see the carb level and serving. You should be able to handle up to 40 for breakfast and up to 5o or 70 for supper if they are mixed with fiber and things that help to slow the digestion of the sugars.

 

We have fun trying some Almond Flour recipes and have a few I like such as the pancakes which are just like regular ones and use sugar free syrup which comes in very low for me. Each pancake is a little over a carb each. A few muffin recipes from it also do well. The one with half almond and flax meal seems to work the best for me and only around 4 carbs each. We make a pie crust from it as well like a graham cracker crust with splenda and smart balance to bind it, then add a fat free, sugar free cheese pie or cake or sugar free/ fat free pudding mix. The variety is nearly endless if you look on the net and find things that are low carb to enjoy.

 

I have read where too low a carb actually is not helpful in staying healthy, I think its the mix of things and how you use them that counts.

 

Larry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
samorgan

I don't think this statement reflects the type of advice that seekers (especially those new to this) should be given in such a blanket fashion:

 

"You should be able to handle up to 40 for breakfast and up to 5o or 70 for supper if they are mixed with fiber and things that help to slow the digestion of the sugars."

 

What would make you think that? The OP has stated that he mostly stays below 35 g for the whole day and his numbers or "OK", good actually except for his morning number which is still a little high. Not a very logical leap to assert that he "should" be fine with FIVE TIMES the amount of carbs he is currently eating. that really doesn't follow.

 

If you can eat 160g of carbs per day, take no meds and have good BG readings, allow me to congratulate you. However, you should appreciate the fact that you are located somewhere out on the fringe of the bell curve. A very large number of T2s - I would guess a sizable majority - cannot maintain normal BG without any meds eating 160g of carbs per day. As such, I don't feel that this is sound advice to be given in such a sweeping manner.

 

Also, vague statements like "too low a carb actually is not helpful in staying healthy" are not really helpful especially not backed up with any kind of facts or citations. There are just so many of us eating what I suppose you would call "too low carb" and are extremely healthy in every way. I don't believe there are ANY studies which support this statement. If I'm wrong, please post cites and that would be useful and could be discussed constructively.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Larry H.

I suppose the Amercian Diabetic Association guide lines mean nothing? I am quoting their suggested carb intake for diabetics. I agree that many people can not eat as many as I can. I never said everyone could. However the OP is stating he is Pre Diabetic, which I am guessing means reasonably low numbers that are not out of control. I was fortunate enough to have a doctor that spotted my problem before it became to the point of no return as far as some carb intake is concerned. My fasting level was 128 when I was told to start watching what I ate. This morning after almost four years my fasting was 84, which is almost a record for me. I have lately included resistance training which has helped noticeably in lowering my already usually reasonable levels.

 

Perhaps I did over state the carb intake. When I see what I eat for lunch it really is probably more like 35 carbs or so if that. It also depends greatly on what I eat and that is a recognized fact that some foods will raise your numbers much faster than others. I stated I can't get by well with rice or most beans. I should have said white flour or sugar in any more than small amounts. But I do exchange them for food that do not raise my levels quickly. A recent trip to Mc Donalds where I had been having a salad for lunch and changed to a small hamburger and a low fat ice cream cup gave me a 225 read, something I have never seen. But then I was eating white flour and sugar loaded ice cream which I do not do normally.

 

Carbohydrate Counting - American Diabetes Association

 

I admit that most here do not adhere to or agree with the ADA. Many are extremely low carb eaters. But I have always been told here also to eat to my meter.. Which I do. My main point was that too many people seem to be going to nearly extremes to achieve a goal. It may be that with increased exercise and good choices one can still obtain reasonable results without denying them self's any joy in eating.

 

If you never got here till your system was totally shot, then I guess your somewhat caught in a situation that will demand very low carb intake. I did not get the impression from the Pre Diabetic reference that the OP was one of those. The readings given in the second post by the OP show that his levels are indeed not very high. I am going by my experience an nothing else. My numbers were much higher when I got here, often readings in the 180 to 190 point after meals. Though good choices and lots of hard work in losing weight, a good exercise program I stick to, I have reduced my after meal levels way down, and my fasting as I mentioned is much lower. My answer was for the OP and not for someone who may have a situation where any amount of carbs will raise their glucose levels significantly. But to say my experiences are Harmful to others is a bit of a stretch given the topic at hand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Larry H.

A point I should have also followed up on was that the OP was reaching out after giving a very low carb diet a try and looking for possibilities beyond the limited scope so far. Having had a similar problem I attempted to give some hope that perhaps they could see if eating good choices of carbs could widen their ability to enjoy foods again. I don't apologize for that. It is always tempered by what the results may be, and for someone new with fairly low numbers its not always clear as in my case what the results will be for some time. If trying a few things creates an issue of raising the numbers beyond comfort levels then don't eat them, that part is pretty simple.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
samorgan

I apologize, Larry, I actually did miss his mentioning being pre-diabetic. That puts your original comments in a different light. I was nonetheless concerned that anyone could read just that post and think this was good advice generally for T2s which it isn't.

 

As for your question:

 

"I suppose the Amercian Diabetic Association guide lines mean nothing?"

 

Is that a rhetorical question? "Mean nothing" is far too kind. With the exception of very mild and pre-diabetic cases like your own, the mainstream diabetic advice is much worse than meaningless it is just plain wrong and extremely harmful.

 

In a perfect world, there should be multiple lawsuits pending for dispensing such advice along with massive investigations into just how an allegedly "concerned" organization managed to deliver advice beneficial only to their corporate sponsors but deadly to their target audience.

 

Conspiracy theory? Not at all. Very nearly ALL of their financial support comes from far from disinterested parties who are making billions and are poised to make many billions more from diabetics following bad advice and needing lots of their products.

 

Read Discussion of This Here

 

Be sure not to miss the linke to the list of "top sponsors" from the ADAs own website in the above article:

 

Top Sponsors List

 

If you still think this organization could give good advice without bias, I have a bunch of old cars and stuff out behind my house I'l like to discussing selling!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Larry H.

Your probably right in many ways. I find that the ADA is way behind the ball on many counts. But so are many doctors. I have had a stretch of them and still do who think there is basically no problem unless your numbers are really up there. In fact my current doctor seems to think that somewhere in the 200 range for fasting is a wake up call and refuses to diagnose my situation as he claims the government won't approve it for medicare unless some pretty high numbers are showing up regularly. So much for keeping your numbers down. As to the recommended carbs by them. Well it was a starting reference point and something to stay mostly well below. The best advice there still is to eat to your meter and if your one of the lucky ones who can eat a bit more carbs fine, and if your not you have to do what is right for your situation. One thing I have seen here over the years is that you can see a lot of variations in what works.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
cls
I apologize, Larry, I actually did miss his mentioning being pre-diabetic. That puts your original comments in a different light. I was nonetheless concerned that anyone could read just that post and think this was good advice generally for T2s which it isn't.

 

As for your question:

 

"I suppose the Amercian Diabetic Association guide lines mean nothing?"

 

Is that a rhetorical question? "Mean nothing" is far too kind. With the exception of very mild and pre-diabetic cases like your own, the mainstream diabetic advice is much worse than meaningless it is just plain wrong and extremely harmful.

 

In a perfect world, there should be multiple lawsuits pending for dispensing such advice along with massive investigations into just how an allegedly "concerned" organization managed to deliver advice beneficial only to their corporate sponsors but deadly to their target audience.

 

Conspiracy theory? Not at all. Very nearly ALL of their financial support comes from far from disinterested parties who are making billions and are poised to make many billions more from diabetics following bad advice and needing lots of their products.

 

Read Discussion of This Here

 

Be sure not to miss the linke to the list of "top sponsors" from the ADAs own website in the above article:

 

Top Sponsors List

 

If you still think this organization could give good advice without bias, I have a bunch of old cars and stuff out behind my house I'l like to discussing selling!

 

On Thursday 4/28 I had a 3 day continuous glucose monitor put on my back, as my BG levels flucuated greatly during the day and night. Afterward, a DE sat down with me and gave me a bag load of booklets to read and pointed out that I should eat at least 45g of carbs at every meal and also have 2 snacks per day. That's over 150 a day. She said I need that many carbs for energy. I told her I never eat that many, I try to stay under 100, I am still trying for less. Such conflicting info makes me crazy. If I could get my meds without a script, I wouldn't go to the doctor at all. I have to keep a log of what I eat, so I am anxious to the the results of the cgm readings taken every 5 minutes.

 

I am a female, 5' 6" and weighed 150 lbs at diagnosis. I had gained 45 lbs after taking Avandia and other meds over the years. I now weight about 167.

 

If I told my doc about eating mostly fat and less than 30g carbs per day, he would probably have a heart attack, himself.

 

Connie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WantHealth

Just wanted to thank everyone very much for their thoughts and insight.

 

I will try to stretch myself more -- to find more items I can eat -- so I'm not in this food rut I currently feel that I'm in.

 

I don't want to go higher than 50-60 carb grams per day for at least one year. I'm hopeful that I can lose about 25 more pounds and virtually turn T-2 Diabetes around with really tight dietary control. Maybe in a year or so I can increase carbs a little bit, but for now I am trying to make a huge impact on my health, with weight loss and lower bg numbers.

 

I haven't tried the various low-carb "bakery" products yet because I'm moving in about a month and don't want to buy all the supplies just to pack them up in boxes and drive for 4 days.... so once I land in my new state in June I plan to try many of the flaxseed/whey protein recipes and see how that works for me.

 

And, yes, I definitely think the ADA is going to need a few massive lawsuits before they get their house in order .... very unfortunately ... people's lives are at stake.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
VeeJay

Quality of life is an important factor when constructing the diabetic diet that works for you. For me, it takes advanced planning to stock the pantry and 'fridge with BG friendly foods so that I don't become bored or dissatisfied.

 

There are many low-carb foods for sale online that are packaged and don't need to be "fixed". I keep some of these on hand for days I don't want to be bothered with cooking/baking. My favorite site is netrition .com as there are so many low-carb convenience foods there.

 

I also go through periods where I get sick of meats, and I have had many meals that are meat free. There are other sources of protein/fat besides meat, cheese and egg (I'm allergic to dairy and egg, so I have become creative on this score). If you can have protein powder, smoothies made with that and cream and flavoring (skip the fruit) that can be a meal. Put meats and eggs in salads which makes them *different*. "Potato salad" made with cooked cauliflower, and full-fat mayo, and eggs is also quite good - maybe with some crisp bacon bits, too. Tuna or salmon salad with mayo. Avocado can be fixed in many ways (it forms the basis of most of my meatless meals).

 

Google "low carb recipes" and you'll find bunches of innovative recipes that migh add variety to your diet and still keep within your personal guidelines, and without having to shop for specialty items.

 

Hope this helps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jillybean

Every once in a while, I get tired of low-carbing and sort of lose my appetite in that nothing seems appealing. At these times, I spend way more time grocery shopping seeking out new things to try! In the past two weekends, I would say I spent a total of at least 5 hours in grocery stores. I usually just go to my local chain grocery stores, but last week and this week, I also hit up Wegmans, Trader Joe's, Whole Foods, and even Super Walmart (nothing against the Walmart for groceries, it's just further away than my usual grocery stores, so I tend to go there less frequently). Suddenly, my fridge, freezer, and pantry are FULL, and if I can't find something in all that's there that I want to eat, then, ******, I'm not eating!

 

I'm also a very lazy cook. Very. I don't enjoy cooking, and I especialy hate cleaning up the kitchen afterwards! So I've found some new products that will become regular staples in my house for snacking, such as a bag of 6 Eggland's Best hard boiled and already peeled eggs ($1.99 at Wegmans), flavored almonds (savory flavors, obviously, not honey roasted or anything - I have barbecue, cinnamon roasted, and some Tuscan that I haven't tried yet), and a ridiculous variety of cheeses. When I want something crunchy, there's nothing better than some shredded parmesan cheese microwaved or baked into chips and then dipped in a low-carb chip dip - just like chips, but almost no carbs!

 

To add to the other comments in this thread, I've been doing a LOT of reading on the topic of low-carb. I eat low in carbs not just for diabetes control (my surgery pretty much took care of that, so I can eat freely and still see A1Cs in the 5s), not just for weight loss (I'm not sure I'll be able to lose any more weight), but also for general good health. I'm going to say it (and someone will undoubtedly vehemently disagree): the human body does not need ANY dietary carbohydrates to function. In fact, the human body doesn't even need fruits or veggies as long as one is consuming a wide variety of meats (including organ meats, which are generally rich in vitamins).

 

Now, I do eat some veggies and an occasional fruit, as well as dairy, but that's just to add variety and to give me conduits by which to add more fat to my diet. I will not delude myself into thinking the human body has somehow evolved to NEED these foods after humans had lived in climates where such things were generaly unavailable for tens of thousands of years. I think we can all agree that refined carbs (crappy white flour products, refined sugars, etc.) are the worst offenders, but I'm convinced that the majority of carbs, regardless of source, are more detrimental than helpful. There is a reason that ketogenic diets (low-carb, high-fat) have been used to treat/improve/control a wide range of conditions, including type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, and obesity as the obvious, but also certain types of epilepsy, some cancers, schizophrenia, alzheimer's...the list goes on.

 

So, sure, eat to your meter if that works for you. For me, there's more to health than that (though, of course, meter readings are still important, but shouldn't be the ONLY thing that is important).

 

[/soapbox] :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lisas

How about a quiche for breakfast? They are beautiful and so good.

 

3 eggs

2.5 oz heavy cream

3.5 oz cream cheese

2 ounces bacon

3 oz of edam cheese

salt

 

Whip the whites and keep in the fridge.

Mix the yolks with the cream cheese, the cream, salt, grated edam cheese and minced bacon (I first fried it in a pan without oil).

Carefully fold the whipped egg whites into the mixture.

Spray PAM in muffin pan.

Spoon mixture into the muffin pan.

Bake in oven, 20 minutes at 374.

 

Servings: 9 (depending on how many muffins in your pan)

Total carbs: 8.5

carbs per each: 0.9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Todd G.

 

I will not delude myself into thinking the human body has somehow evolved to NEED these foods after humans had lived in climates where such things were generaly unavailable for tens of thousands of years.

 

They have found cave drawings illustrating indigenous people hunting water buffalo and then going to Krispy Kreme after the feast for dessert. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jillybean
They have found cave drawings illustrating indigenous people hunting water buffalo and then going to Krispy Kreme after the feast for dessert. :)

Well, then, I stand corrected ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.