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huligoo

how to get A1c down for TTC...low carbing is causing am spikes

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huligoo

Could it be that I am not having enough food...

 

I feel so hungry and weak ...since I have been low carbing...

 

Has anyone gone from meds to insulin to get the A1c down?

 

Im very insulin resistant.

 

I really wanna get preggo and my A1c is not in tight enough range

 

Im taking

metformin

actos

amaryl

and 10 units of NPH at night.

 

with this low carb food. Im feeling light headed and dizzy and almost like hungover feeling.

 

any tips or ideas?

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aggie168

OK, I am a little slow and not familiar with your term TTC.

 

But here we go. You are taking Metformin to reduce your liver to dump glucose, hence lower your BG. Then you are taking Actos to help your muscle to absorb glucose better, hence lower your BG. Then you are taking Amaryl (glimepiride) to force your pancreas to produce more insulin, again, trying to lower your BG. Then you are taking NPH insulin at night to help our lower your BG. Now you started low carbs and not put enough glucose back into your blood stream. One simple answer, you may have went overboard and your liver have to dump glucose to response to a low. You probably went too far with low carbs for the amount of BG lowering drug in your system. :)

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Denedil

Light headed, dizzy, hungover feeling? Those are signs of being low. I tend to have AM spikes too if I get too low at night. Low carbing caused a drastic decrease in my insulin requirements, probably yours too. Protein before bed helps keep my spikes at bay.

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NickP

Normally, when people switch to a LC diet, their diabetes medications must be closely monitored and usually significantly reduced.

 

A LC diet will allow you to naturally control your BG's.

 

How often are you testing your BG? Have you told your Doctor that you are going on a LC diet.

 

When Diabetics went to see Dr Atkins, he would immediately put them on a LC diet, and reduce their diabetes medications by 50%.

 

I strongly advocate a LC diet, but when you are taking a number of medications to help control your BG, you need to work with your Doctor in both monitoring both your medication levels and your BG levels. You do not want to go too low....

 

Good Luck!

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diaboki

If you are eating low carb, you should not feel hungry and weak. Are you eating enough? Are you getting enough fat in your diet? When you eat less carbs, you need to eat more fat for energy. What are you eating these days?

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janice21475
If you are eating low carb, you should not feel hungry and weak. Are you eating enough? Are you getting enough fat in your diet? When you eat less carbs, you need to eat more fat for energy. What are you eating these days?
BINGO!

 

When my husband was 1st diagnosed, I plunged into feeding us low carb. I only counted the carb numbers and neglected to assure us of enough Calories. I was starving him. He kept passing out. We were frightened it was something serious. Of course, if I had kept starving him, it would have been. Somehow my body, not being diabetic, I guess, was able to starve and be OK. I did lose about 40 pounds pretty quickly. Don't recommend that to anyone.

 

For a while I was using MedHelp charts to track the calories/fat/protein and carbs, that was a big help. I do not know if the site still does that.

 

You should not feel weak - take care,

Janice & husband

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jwags

Most of us who have switched to Low Carb have found it took a month or so for our bodies to adjust to burning fat. In the beginning many feel these symptoms. In the Atkins diet they actually call it the Atkins Flu. How many calories are you eating a day. Most of us don't cut back on calories but actually increase our calories by adding fat to our diet. It is the fat that holds bgs steady in between meals. It took me almost 2 years of low carbing and medication to finally get my bgs in range, it did not happen overnight. Have patience. If you want quicker control you may need to add fast acting insulin at meals. How are your bgs running now?

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aiah23

You're probably aware of the A1C range you need for TTC'g. So my question to you is what time of day are your blood sugars fluctuating higher? You may need something more specific/systematic than LC'g (and once pregnant your docs may tell you LC'g by current definitions doesn't give you or the baby enough...as your frequently susceptible to lows in your 1st trimester). Your docs will probably take you off of those oral meds once you know you're pregnant anyway so perhaps it would be more beneficial to see your endo about some fast-acting insulin now (you'll most likely need it from around 28 weeks on if not sooner given that you're already a type 2) and get a routine down with that and your NPH so the shift during pregnancy doesn't result in even more craziness blood sugar wise when you're battling extreme fatigue and crazy hormonal fluctuations.

 

Fawn

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clashann

I have always found that I get am spikes as a result of a hypo during the night, sometimes I am aware of the hypo's other times it only becomes apparent that I had one when I check my bg levels and they are high. Here in the UK, a HBA1C of 6.1 is ideal for TTC :)

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