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Murley

Is a low CARB diet the way forward?

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Murley

Hi, i have been a type 1 diabetic since the age of 16. I am 19 now and am at the point where i want to have a better grip on the amount of carbs/proteins/fat i eat.

 

I know the type of foods that are good for me, but the question is: how much do i need of each macronutrient?

 

I am fairly active and go to the gym 3 times a week doing a 3 way split weight training routine. I don't do too much cardio at the moment but will occassional do high intensity interval training.

 

I'm just wondering what sort of levels should i be eating, in terms on Grams.

Im not overwight but i do hold my body fat around my stomach.

 

My PROTEIN intake is around 1.2 - 1.5g per Kg body weight.

My FAT intake comes from sources such as nuts, oils and fish

 

The big area is the carbs. I know things such as fruit can contain around 20g of carbs.

 

Any suggestions/advice would be greatly appreciated.

 

 

Ryan

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Subby

Hi Ryan. So is this purely in relation to your weight? I don't think there is an absolute answer out there (although you will find people who will claim there is). It seems that overweight insulin resistant people report good success on low carb in improving their bgs with diet control and with weight loss, but I don't think you are automatically in that category.

 

I found that reducing carbs generally helps keep me on the lighter side of my weight tendencies. Nothing dramatic. I find that for me, as someone with a similar issue with weight (a bit more than I want around the belly, not generally overweight) who goes to the gym more days than not and does substantial cardio, the biggest factor in whether I lose, gain or hold weight is probably overall energy consumed. Avoiding excessive carbs comes in a significant second.

 

I'd suggest you experiment on yourself. Try out low, or lower carb, pick something substantially different and just try it for a time, see what happens. If you do, you may need to revise your stance on fats and whether the likes of natural animal fats really are as bad as has been suggested. I'd also suggest you incorporate some moderate cardio into your life, most days.

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Subby

Also, perhaps to state the obvious, be sure your boluses are suitable for the number of carbs you eat. If you don't already or are not sure, i:c ratios and carb counting are the best way to do this.

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Murley

ok thanks, im coming at it from a view point of stabalising BS whilst perhaps lowering Body Fat slightly. I know that the lower amount of carbs i eat the lower units of insulin i need.

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ok thanks, im coming at it from a view point of stabalising BS whilst perhaps lowering Body Fat slightly. I know that the lower amount of carbs i eat the lower units of insulin i need.

 

Cool, just worth checking. If someone on fixed doses suddenly dropped their carbs, it could be disaster.

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Hoping4Cure

I've reduced my insulin intake by half since going low carb. I've been reading the paleo diet, which recommends carbs only right before workouts, but that's for non-diabetic athletes. The other day I ate some peanut butter whole wheat toast (which is one of the things I've cut out entirely) before hitting the gym and doing intensive cardio, and I felt great, more energy than normally and the workout was better. However, when I used to eat that way all the time before workouts, it was always a precarious balancing act to maintain good BGs during the workout itself. 1/2 the time my workout would be cut short due to dropping too fast, or feeling angsty due to my sugars being too high during the workout itself. Especially running fast for an hour on the treadmill, since adrenalin can massively spike your sugar. (after 20 minutes your body starts burning fat, which is the desired goal, but that fat will spike your sugar and make you feel like ants under your skin by the end). I used to take big doses of insulin AFTER a big run, when my sugars were often in the 20s even when they were perfect at the start. Weights are different though, my sugars almost always end up going down, especially during intensive sessions with my workout buddy (I've often had to leave because my sugars would crash pretty fast when we get into the heavy negatives).

 

When I was your age I didn't have a care in the world, but I certainly wish I could have given myself a copy of the paleo diet book and bernstein's book to read. It would have saved me a lot of grief. Anyway, moral of the story is, if pro thriathletes and Iron Men athletes can improve their times and reduce their recovery times (the most important thing when you are training heavily, is how long it takes to recover in between workouts), by going on the Paleo diet (with carbs only pre-workout, and meats/veggies/fats the rest of the time), then you are assured that as a Type 1, you are not getting the short end of the stick in terms of athletic performance, by avoiding the insane amount of daily carbs recommended by the food pyramid / breakfast cereal cartel. I know some pro body builders who took extra insulin to get huger and absorb more calories, to the point where they said type 1 diabetics can be some of the strongest men at the gym (insulin is a growth hormone, after all), but much better than that is just to maximize your cardio fitness and keep your weight on the low side. Contrary to what a lot of (I think, delusional) people say, being thin is just plain, better for you. Diabetic or not.

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xMenace

I know the type of foods that are good for me, but the question is: how much do i need of each macronutrient?

 

The truth is we really don't know what is good and bad for us. For example, when you try to track down the science explaining why saturated fat is bad, you can't find it. In fact, science shows that our livers convert most fructose we consume to a saturated fat. Bacon is bad and fruit is good? Really? We're all caught up in a wave of assumption.

 

I am fairly active and go to the gym 3 times a week doing a 3 way split weight training routine. I don't do too much cardio at the moment but will occassional do high intensity interval training.

 

This will help you burn carbs, but there's more to eating carbs than weight gain. Some science shows modern western diseases are based on carb consumption: cancers feed on sugar, high trigs (that fructose and excess sugar processed by our livers) lead to small, dense, and dangerous LDLs, and glycation=internal rust (oxydyzation).

 

 

I'm just wondering what sort of levels should i be eating, in terms on Grams.

Im not overwight but i do hold my body fat around my stomach.

 

My PROTEIN intake is around 1.2 - 1.5g per Kg body weight.

My FAT intake comes from sources such as nuts, oils and fish

 

The big area is the carbs. I know things such as fruit can contain around 20g of carbs.

 

 

I follow a simple mathematical approach. We have a daily caloric requirement, we are limited in the protein we can eat, and evidence leans towards sugar being bad. If protein = 20% and carbs = 10%, then fat must = 70%.

 

I say be a true type 1 and experiment on you lab rat body!

 

Welcome to the lab, John

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