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xMenace

NY Times Article and Taubes' Response

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xMenace

Original article by Tara Parker-Pope

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/01/magazine/tara-parker-pope-fat-trap.html?_r=1&pagewanted=all

 

Response by Gary Taubes

 

Petition Letter to the Editor of the New York Times, in response to "The Fat Trap" (Jan 1, 2012)

 

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This article and response echo many of the discussions we've had here. I'm sure you will find them interesting and informative.

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xMenace

The petitioners want signatures from doctors and Phd researchers, not the every day patient. If you are one, msg me about getting the password.

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Ela

Thank you for posting this XMenace!

 

I read the article and especially a response by Gary Taubes with great interest. And yes, it supports our many discussions on this forum and also the experience of the members: most did lose weight and keep it off on the low carb diet.

 

I'm a relatively new member, but also lost 30 lbs about 6 months ago and keep it off without much difficulty. I do not restrict calories, but do restrict carbs and just trying to not overeat and this is getting easier and easier - somehow overeating doesn't bring me as much comfort as before. However I eat now much more "sweets" than before, they are just sugar free and very low on carbs sweets.

 

In any case, I hope that medical community pays attention and signs the petition. I also hope that official nutritional guidelines of low fat, low calories are revised in favor of more realistic approach.

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Gladtobehere

Thanks for the post X.

 

As a T1, I personally believe that eliminating simple carbs and carefully selecting the amount of complex carbs minimizes the need for injected insulin. My guess is that there are a lot of diabetics who would agree. I also suspect, but have no studies to prove it, that T1s who are in relatively good control of their disease are generally not hugely overweight. But of course their will always be exceptions , some caused by other medical conditions and others caused by those who see insulin as a ticket to eat.

 

But I ramble.

 

I blame the food industry for making, marketing and selling more and more cheap product with too much simple carb and very little nutrient value.

 

I also think the food industry has enough food scientists and medical people on the payroll to produce ANY study result they so desire.

 

IMHO, there will be NO CHANGE until the people start to abandon the junk in the isles of the grocery store.

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Chanson13

Thanks for the post, X. I read the first article in paper form when it came out on Sunday. Taubes' response is very interesting.

 

The NY Times had an article a few months back about the benefits of low-carbing and the history of the high-carb diet recommendations of the USDA.

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Grunch

I thought the response was quite patronizing. Also, she says in the article: "While the public discussion about weight loss tends to come down to which diet works best (Atkins? Jenny Craig? Plant-based? Mediterranean?), those who have tried and failed at all of these diets know there is no simple answer.". So Taubes issues a response saying "I support the Atkins diet". What is she supposed to respond to that? "Well I'm sorry, I didn't know bookseller Taubes supported the Atkins diet. If that's the case I guess the discussion is over".

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Subby
I thought the response was quite patronizing. Also, she says in the article: "While the public discussion about weight loss tends to come down to which diet works best (Atkins? Jenny Craig? Plant-based? Mediterranean?), those who have tried and failed at all of these diets know there is no simple answer.". So Taubes issues a response saying "I support the Atkins diet". What is she supposed to respond to that? "Well I'm sorry, I didn't know bookseller Taubes supported the Atkins diet. If that's the case I guess the discussion is over".

 

No, her response could be to tackle weight gain as an issue worth applying thought, reason and science to - whether that be considering evidence and issues with/for Atkins, or any other method - rather than a comprehensive washing of the hands, which appears to be basically what her article is pitching for. "We get fat, it's complicated, I can't work out any answers for myself (and I am obviously personally hung up about it), so we really should all just accept it and expect it". That deserves to have the wind taken out of it in my book. As some kind of personal confessional it's fine, but I'm assuming that as an article in a leading journal it is intended to carry - forgive the pun - authoritative weight, and that's unfortunate.

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xMenace
I thought the response was quite patronizing. Also, she says in the article: "While the public discussion about weight loss tends to come down to which diet works best (Atkins? Jenny Craig? Plant-based? Mediterranean?), those who have tried and failed at all of these diets know there is no simple answer.". So Taubes issues a response saying "I support the Atkins diet". What is she supposed to respond to that? "Well I'm sorry, I didn't know bookseller Taubes supported the Atkins diet. If that's the case I guess the discussion is over".

 

You dis a bookseller but you side with someone paid to write an article? You dis a bookseller in favor of scientists funded by big business? How is a person supposed to convey ideas today, forum posts? Who reads these?

 

This is not an argument to be taken lightly. If you don't know, there's been a western disease epidemic underway since at least 1980. The cost in human lives and suffering is tremendous. If you're part of this forum, you should realize this, first hand, and it's going to get much worse before it gets better. We need serious, objective discussion and action. If anything, Miss Parker-Pope's article was the patronizing one: she elaborately submitted to the failures of the leading bariatric prationers like a child following mommy's orders. She has refused to acknowledge the real science and the real successes, and believe it or not, the successes we've achieved are real and significant. But, we can't believe him because high fat diets are heart unhealthy, everybody knows it, and we can't have that [Despite there not being suffient evidence to make such claims. If you have it, prove it or shut up.] Those who side with the idea that it's individual mental weakness, reduced activity, or too much computer game playing that caused of this crisis need to wake the **** up. Taubes explanation is the only one so far that explains all cases.

 

We need real scientists that practice independantly of money influencers and power brokers, and unfortunatley, that either means a socialist movement -- sorry GOPers -- and/or a strong independant legislative body. In my opinion, Taubes' solicitation of professional opinion is necessary. As you've implied, he's not qualified to stand alone in his claims, but the real science, whatever it is, will emerge eventually. The last time I looked, the petition had about 350 signatures. Maybe 200 were MDs. When we start seeing MDs and Phds finally getting the balls to stand up for what's right, and it cascades, then we'll see some real change. Taubes is not standing alone in this battle.

 

I will accept any logical, supported answers, but your flippancy really pisses me off. It's what's wrong with society today. Open your mind and think, please.

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Grunch

I don't see what's wrong with being paid to write an article. She is a journalist and is writing about the general view she gets on the whole issue and her personal experiences. She's not a scientist and especially not one who focuses on one very narrow slice of the whole weight gain science, so she expressed what she understands about the entire range of varied views and approaches out there, and wasn't rude in any way imo (I didn't see the bariatric thing you refer to). If the scientists who dedicate their lives to studying weight gain/loss still haven't reached anything close to a consensus, why would I demand that a journalist pick one very specific side in a multi-way battle that doesn't seem to be anywhere near an end? Taubes got signatures from a few doctors, OK. I'm sure if people representing any of the other points of view started collecting signatures they would manage to collect a lot more. So how does that help the Atkins view in any way?

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