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Seedpod

Does Lisinopril Really Protect the Kidneys

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Seedpod

My doctor wants me to take Lisinopril. I'm reluctant b/c my blood pressure is already pretty low and I never had a problem with high blood pressure. My previous doctor never wanted to prescribe it b/c he said there is no proof whatsoever that this medication protects the kidneys, that they are still "studying" the possibility. Sometimes I wonder if the pharmaceutical companies aren't just looking to make a little more money. Anyway, I have refused to take it until there is proof that this actually protect the kidneys.

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Vilya

I'm on a low dose of it, but my level of microalbumin in the urine was a little elevated, as was my BP. From what I've read, it's got a pretty good safety record and can protect the kidneys. However, I understand your reluctance to take it, given your BP being low already.

 

My BP is now down (around 110/65 most of the time), but honestly I don't know if that's from the lisinopril or from my low-carb diet and big ol' weight loss. ;) I'll stay on it for now, as I am not experiencing any of the side effects and my last urine test still showed increased microalbumin.

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Chanson13

I've been taking it for about 25 years - 10mg per day. When I started taking it, my endo said that it had a protective effect for the kidneys, and I have never had kidney issues. My BP has been slightly on the high side, but never really "high." I would think they would know for sure by now if it really does protect the kidneys, but I haven't read anything about that.

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Cora

ACE inhibitors have been used to help kidneys in diabetics since the 80s. That's about 30 years. I had kidney problems back then and was put on a very early ACE called captopril. It was the first and I give it full credit for keeping my kidneys functioning for another 20 years before I needed dialysis. I already had some significant damage when I started the drug. I did end up on lisinopril and it was nice because it was only once per day. I hate taking pills too, but think of it this way. If it does drop your bp too much (and it doesn't affect bp a lot, it just seems to act more on the kidney area) you can always stop. But it may protect you from having to go through some nasty stuff. That's my take on it anyway and I believe I had a lot of success with it.

 

Cora

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IrinaHarr

Cora, did the pancreas transplant cure you from diabetes? I.e. What are your BG levels now and do you take insulin?

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sumi

Seedpod, I am taking ramipril as I had borderline high bloodpressure. My Dr. also said it protects kidneys. I have no problem taking it as it seems to have brought my bp into line . I do understand your reluctance though. If I did not have the slight elevation in bp (I have no kidney problems), I would probably resist. I know it is supposed to help kidney function, but have no idea if this has a strong factual base or is pharmaceutical spin. Perhaps the kidney health is directly related to having good bp levels. I often wish I had the ability to read and interpret studies for myself.

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aggie168
My doctor wants me to take Lisinopril. I'm reluctant b/c my blood pressure is already pretty low and I never had a problem with high blood pressure.

 

Yes, any of the xxxxpril or ACE inhibitor is good for protecting your kidney. I try stopping it for 6 months, next "urine and blood" test all # starts to go up/up. Go back on it. Six month later, all number are back to normal. Yes, I have been taking it for many years. No, I will not leave home without it. Anymore.

 

BTW, most of the xxxpril may cause dry cough, that is why I talk a ACE inhibitor instead. :)

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Cora
Cora, did the pancreas transplant cure you from diabetes? I.e. What are your BG levels now and do you take insulin?

 

While transplant is not a "cure" as it will fail eventually - I have perfectly normal blood sugars (last ac 5.0) with no insulin. After 42 years with T1 it's a wonderful feeling! I test for fun now and no surprises. The only surprise I got was some high tests which turned out to be due to an old meter pooping out. lol

 

Cora

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Moonpie

I had to stop taking it, due to the coughing issues. He switched me to losartan instead. Sorry, can't be of any more help.

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Seedpod

Well, I certainly appreciate all the responses. I have a bottle of the stuff, so maybe I should at least try it, but don't want the dry, hacking cough that a lot of people seem to get with taking this medication. My boss takes it for high blood pressure and she just coughs and coughs and coughs. Very annoying.

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aggie168
Well, I certainly appreciate all the responses. I have a bottle of the stuff, so maybe I should at least try it, but don't want the dry, hacking cough that a lot of people seem to get with taking this medication. My boss takes it for high blood pressure and she just coughs and coughs and coughs. Very annoying.

 

1. You should know within weeks if you are one of those that have the dry cough. If yes, switch to an ARB and that should cure it.

2. If you are nice to your boss, let her know the cough may be related to the drug and she can switch it and most likely get ride of it.

 

:)

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Ela

I take ramipril because I do have elevated BP, however I resisted it as much as I could. I had some dry cough in the beginning, but it went away.

 

Anyway, it's just me and my opinion but if MY BP was OK, I would NEVER EVER take ANY MEDICATION "to protect" whatever organ. This is all B.S. about "protection" (and I don't mean "Blood Sugar"). Yes, if you got a problem it might help and therefore "protect", but if your BP is normal and your kidney function is normal IMHO any chemical thing you put into your body is actually aggravating your kidney and probably liver and who knows what else. And this is what actually my doctor told me and I'm totally with her on this.

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Seagal

This is from the HealthCentral site:

 

ACE Inhibitors (Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors) act within the kidney's. The kidney's produce renin. Renin is converted to angiotensis-I on into angiotensis-II. Angiotensin-II is a powerful vasoconstrictor (causes your blood vessel diameter to be smaller). Angiotensin-II also secretes aldosterone, which holds water and sodium in the kidneys instead of excreting them. This leads to increased blood volume and high blood pressure. ACE Inhibitors prevent the conversion of angiotensin-I to angiotensin-II.

 

ARB's (Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers) also work within the kidney. ARB's prevent angiotensin-II from binding to its' receptor site, preventing blood vessel constriction and the secretion of aldosterone.

 

 

 

ARB's are a newer class of high blood pressure medication and tend to be better tolerated. However, it's best to work with your MD to determine the appropriate medication for your treatment.

 

 

 

I have been coughing with Lisinopril for years and the dr. said they all caused a cough, but never mentioned the ARBs. I am supposed to get a refill in a week or so and will get it changed.

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aggie168
Yes, any of the xxxxpril or ACE inhibitor is good for protecting your kidney. I try stopping it for 6 months, next "urine and blood" test all # starts to go up/up. Go back on it. Six month later, all number are back to normal. Yes, I have been taking it for many years. No, I will not leave home without it. Anymore.

 

BTW, most of the xxxpril may cause dry cough, that is why I talk a ACE inhibitor instead. :)

 

The last statement should read, "BTW, most of the xxxpril may cause dry cough, that is why I take an ARB (Benicar) instead of an ACE inhibitor.

 

Too late in the evening and I can not type correctly. :)

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Mad_dog

I had to stop takining Lisinopril. One morning my Lips began to swell and by the time I was at the emergency room my tonge was the size of a softball. The doctor on duty went down the list of meds I was taking, sure enough, he's seen many cases of angioedema caused by the Lisinopril. When it happened I had alreday been taking it for five years.

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NittanyDad

I was just "put on it" too. 5mg per day. No cough showing after 30 days. My blood pressure has always been in the normal range. Now, it's much lower.

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Ela
I was just "put on it" too. 5mg per day. No cough showing after 30 days. My blood pressure has always been in the normal range. Now, it's much lower.

 

Why would you take it if your BP is normal? And why do you need it lower? :confused:

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jerryn

I can tell you first hand that metformin in high doses like what you are taking can mess up your kidneys. My kidneys are functioning normally but after I took ibuprofen for a nasty sinus headache I started to leak microalbumin. So be careful. I'm hoping my kidneys heal.

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Miss Milly
My doctor wants me to take Lisinopril. I'm reluctant b/c my blood pressure is already pretty low and I never had a problem with high blood pressure. My previous doctor never wanted to prescribe it b/c he said there is no proof whatsoever that this medication protects the kidneys, that they are still "studying" the possibility. Sometimes I wonder if the pharmaceutical companies aren't just looking to make a little more money. Anyway, I have refused to take it until there is proof that this actually protect the kidneys.

 

I think you are doing the absolutely right thing to avoid it. I was on it for years before I got my own bp meter and began testing at home. My bp was too low, especially as i had recently improved my diet and lost weight. So I asked to doctor if I could come off them and he told me lisinopril protects the kidneys too. I insisted on coming off though. I did it over 3 months and am now free of it. I check my bp daily and it is perfect - usually around 110/65. I truly believe that if you don't need pills, don't have them. I want my body to function naturally as it is meant to do. I now take no pills at all and feel much better, more energetic and healthier than ever before.

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geoblewis

I was on it for about a year for bp readings that were slowly creeping up for the first time in my life. Turns out the higher bp was situational (stess from divorce, moving and becoming a caregiver to aging and ailing parents). I had the cough and actually started gaining weight from it, even though I was also on a diuretic, but my doctor kept telling me to stay on it. Eventually my stressful situations were resolved and my bp went down considerably, so I quit taking it. After a couple months, the weight I had gained came off. And since then, I've lost another 35lbs. I don't like it when my doctor pushes meds. I'm kinda regretting the baby aspirin that I'm taking since I've read that going off it puts you at higher risk for a stroke immediately after doing so. Wasn't told that when I was told to start taking it. I've been slowly tapering off.

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renee42789

Lisinopril is an ACE inhibitor which also blocks the release of aldosterone. Basically, it block the hormones that constrict your blood vessels and therefore increase in blood pressure. I have not heard about any solid research that states that it also offers kidney protection. The only ACE inhibitor that has been proven to decrease potential of diabetic neuropathy (kidney disease) is captopril. Hope this helps!

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plant1965

I have watched my dad perform home hemo dialysis on my mom for the past seven years and everything I have read and heard from drs is that it does help. I watched my mom decline and bones become more brittle and break often (one of the effects of dialysis) until she died recently! I have had the misfortune of being the only child of 6 so far to have inherited diabetes and I have been on lisinopril for abt three years now. I do not want to EVER be at the state my mom was in. I do not have high blood pressure and am on.a low dose at 5 mg. I do believe their is even a 2 mg dose. Talk to your Dr. do some more research but I think u will find it is beneficial .

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Adamandymom

I was on 20 mg lisinopril as well. I had no il effects but did have to discontinue due to low blood pressure. My md said it was to protect the kidneys as well. I don't know..sometime I feel like what Is supposedly good for you today may not be good for you tomorrow!

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moneymeister

My sister (EMT for 20 years and also a former diabetic) explained it opens the blood vessels in the kidneys that are usually damaged over time in diabetics, allowing blood flow to reach all of the delicate kidney structures better...and better blood flow equates to kidney health. She would probably laugh at my "terminology" here, I don't remember word for word, but that is the sum of it.

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