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Cormac_Doyle

Stupid Principal

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Cormac_Doyle

If a newly diagnosed 8 year old girl with diabetes "tests" another child in her class with her lancet ... that does NOT warrant calling the police, nor suspending the child for 5 days.

 

Come and give some support to a very frustrated parent!

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jojeti

I am sure they saw it as sharing bodily fluids. I guess if I were the parent of the other child who got tested, I would be upset because of an unsanitary lancet going into my child. As far as the punishment? There may have been other ways to handle it. My first question would be, was she ever told not to use her used lancet on another person? If not, I would blame the person that trained her.

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ciarak

I agree this is totally uncalled for :(

 

People need to get educated and stop being so ignorant! I support you Nicole, 5 days suspension is too excessive :(

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mmmtat

I understand the other parent being concerned and upset, but there is no way I think this warrents "punishment" for your daughter...she just needs to be educated not to share that kind of thing.

 

Incidently, I tested my husbands coworker a few months ago and then realized I hadn't changed the lancet. He gave me a hard time for about 30 seconds, but quickly got over it.

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Cormac_Doyle

Exactly ... maybe not a good idea - but not womething that needs this type of reaction

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Chanson13

I think calling the police when 8-year-olds are involved is generally a mistake. The police are trained to handle criminals, not third-graders.

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poodlebone

This definitely does not warrant a police call. I do think the school should let the other child's parents know about it because as others have pointed out, it's not safe using the same lancet on more than one person, even kids.

 

A couple of years ago I read a story about a kid who was suspended from school because she let her non-diabetic friend taste one of her glucose tablets. The school claimed the tabs were considered medicine and therefore the kid got in trouble for sharing "drugs". I can't stand those zero tolerance policies.

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CDeuce

Poor kid!! How devastated is she?? It's hard enough to now deal with being "different" from her classmates. School policies and reactions can be over the top. While I understand that this is upsetting to the other parents/teachers, I do agree wholeheartedly with Chanson's comment.

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Cormac_Doyle

Cindy ... if you are in the chat later, talk to Nicole about it ... it's really upset her and Lena!

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Chanson13

Police involvement with kids - I don't get it. My secretary (lives in small town in Vermont - the kind of town where people listen to the police scanner for entertainment) heard the police being called to the school to deal with "a five-year-old who is out of control."

 

Why would you call the police for a "five-year-old out of control?" You need "back-up?" You need to arrest someone? And what message does that give the five-year-old? It's amazing.

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Peggy_TX

I might be tempted to try sitting with the principal and discussing the idea of "over-reacting to a child who is struggling with a handicap"

The kid needs to be told that we should never share needles, and the other child's parents need to be told what happened. (and appropriate medical test results should be shared if the "testee's" parents are worried)

After that, it full blown over-reaction

And playing the "handicap" and "prejudice" cards would be worth a try.

(Poor kid........ guess now she needs the "some adults are idiots" speech too......)

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Gladtobehere

I understand the immense frustration you must feel for this situation. Your child should NOT be punished. You have my sympathy.

 

Schools tend to over react to many things for fear of legal repercussions from parents. This case is an EXTREME over reaction! Probably ignorance and fear of legal action combined.

 

Aside from mentioning to your daughter that she should not share lancets and other items, I think her actions are probably as much the result of the other kids curiosity rather than your daughters desire to experiment.

 

It is unfortunate that the educators did not see this event as a PERFECT opportunity for the children to learn something new!

 

I know there is a T1 kid, on a pump, in my grand daughters grade 2 class and all the kids know to alert the teacher when he is showing signs of being low. BUT the teacher or an assistant controls all the BG testing and supplies. So awareness is the key.

 

Yeah, only in Canada you say? But I see parent over reaction ALL the time, and the local school and teachers are extremely paranoid regarding ANY parental or child complaint. So it's not all rosie and clear sailing.

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foxl
We have lost our collective minds.

 

Jen

 

YEP -- Principal probably CYA-ing over a bunch of hysterical and / or rabid parents. I know our school dist is overwhelmed with custody issues -- unauthorized child pickups.

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Moonpie

ridiculous over reaction. I am sure the cops have more important things to do, that stop kids from being kids. I hope the children involved will recover without too much hassle.

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amiguita

I've had some experience with these police "interventions" and sometimes, they truly defy logic. When my eldest daughter was in middle school, her honors English class was given a journal assignment that detailed what they would do if they had the ability to become invisible. First red flag, right? Well, my daughter, a brilliant and, yes, published writer, wrote that she might come up behind people who she disliked and pull their hair or kick them in the shin (she had been experiencing bullying) and maybe walk into a bank and take some cash. Guess what the teacher did? She reported her to the principal who reported her to the police. Yup. No history of any kind of violent or questionable behavior, and she had to report to the in-school police officer every day for 5 days. The officer actually called me and apologized. He thought it was ridiculous, too. What's more, he read her entire journal and said she was talented beyond her years.

 

My son, prior to his senior prom, was pulled aside and stripped search. The reason? They felt that because of some of his known friends, he might very well be capable of bringing in drugs to the dance. Again, no history of anything remotely close to bringing in or using drugs in school.

 

On the other hand, nothing was ever done for my daughter's bullying except for useless "mediation" and when the same nasty girls started bullying the youngest (they were two years apart), again nothing was done UNTIL I CALLED the police, gave them copies of threatening text messages and chats and threatened the school legal action.

 

Sometimes there really is no rhyme or reason. You'd think the school officials would take into consideration the age of the child who did the testing. Very silly.

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