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snj

Check out the few pointers on Diabetic diet

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snj

Hey ladies... Was just chking out diabetic diets online n i happen to find these... Take a look! Hope it wl b helpful! All the best.

 

 

Diabetes and carbohydrates

Carbohydrates (foods high in starch and sugar) have the greatest impact on blood glucose levels, since they are broken down into glucose during digestion. It is important to control the amount of carbohydrate by eating the same amount of carbohydrate along with some protein and fat at each meal.

 

Goals for healthy eating

 

Eat three small meals and two or three snacks at regular times every day. Do not skip meals or snacks.

Eat less carbohydrate at breakfast than at other meals because this is when insulin resistance is the greatest.

Try to eat a consistent amount of carbohydrate during each meal and snack.

If you have morning sickness, eat 1-2 servings of crackers, cereal or pretzels before getting out of bed; eat small, frequent meals throughout the day and avoid fatty, fried and greasy foods. If you take insulin and have morning sickness, make sure you know how to treat low blood glucose.

Choose foods high in fiber such as whole-grain breads, cereals, pasta, rice, fruits and vegetables.

 

Eat foods with less sugar and fat.

 

Drink at least 8 cups (or 64 ounces) of liquids per day.

 

Make sure you are getting enough vitamins and minerals in your daily diet. Ask your health care provider about taking a prenatal vitamin and mineral supplement to meet the nutritional needs of your pregnancy.

 

Here are some other guidelines:

 

Eat and drink at least 4 servings of dairy products and calcium-rich foods a day to help ensure that you are getting 1200 mg. of calcium in your daily diet. Sources of calcium include dairy products, some nuts, green vegetables and foods and beverages fortified with calcium, such as calcium-fortified, unsweetened ready-to-eat cereals.

 

Eat at least three servings of iron-rich foods per day to ensure you are getting 30 mg. of iron in your daily diet. Sources of iron include enriched grain products (rice); lean meat, poultry and fish; eggs and leafy green vegetables.

 

Choose at least one source of Vitamin C every day. Sources of Vitamin C include oranges, grapefruits, strawberries, honeydew, broccoli, cauliflower, brussel sprouts, green peppers, tomatoes and mustard greens.

 

Choose at least one source of folic acid every day. Sources include dark green leafy vegetables, veal, fortified grain products, legumes (lima beans, black beans, black-eyed peas and chickpeas) and fruits.

 

Choose at least one source of Vitamin A every other day. Sources rich in Vitamin A include carrots, pumpkins, sweet potatoes, spinach, water squash, turnip greens, beet greens, apricots and cantaloupe.

 

Avoid alcoholic beverages during pregnancy. Alcohol has been linked to premature delivery and low birth weight babies. If you think you may have a problem with alcohol use, please talk to your health care provider so he or she can help protect you and your baby.

Limit caffeine to no more than 300 mg. per day (two 8-ounce cups of coffee, three 8-ounce cups of tea or three 12-ounce glasses of caffeinated soda). Remember, chocolate contains caffeine -- the amount of caffeine in a chocolate bar is equal to 1/4 cup of coffee.

DO NOT DIET or try to lose weight during pregnancy -- both you and your baby need the proper nutrients in order to be healthy. Ask your health care provider how much weight you should gain during pregnancy. A woman of average weight before pregnancy can expect to gain 25 to 35 pounds during pregnancy. You may need to gain more or less weight, depending on what your health care provider recommends.

Eat a variety of foods to get all the nutrients you need. The Food Guide Pyramid on the next page provides an example of the number of servings you should eat from each food group every day.

The use of non-nutritive or artificial sweeteners approved by the Food and Drug Administration is acceptable during pregnancy. These FDA-approved sweeteners include aspartame and acesulfame-K. The use of saccharin is strongly discouraged during pregnancy because it can cross the placenta and may remain in fetal tissues. Talk with your health care provider about how much non-nutritive sweetener is acceptable during pregnancy.

Foods to Choose to Lower Blood Sugar

 

Breads and Grains

6-11 servings/day

 

Fruits and Vegetables

2-4 servings/day

 

Dairy

4 servings/day

 

1 slice of bread

1/2 bagel or English muffin

1 plain rice cake

6 crackers (such as matzo, bread sticks, rye crisps, saltines)

3 graham crackers

3/4 cup ready-to-eat cereal

1/2 cup pasta or rice

1/2 cup corn

Small plain baked potato

1 small pancake

1 6-inch tortilla

1 piece of fresh fruit

1 melon wedge

1/2 cup chopped, cooked, frozen or unsweetened canned fruits

 

3-5 or more vegetable servings/day

 

1/2 cup cooked or*canned vegetables

1 cup chopped, uncooked or frozen vegetables

 

1 cup low-fat milk

1 cup soy milk

1 cup low-fat unsweetened yogurt

1 1/2 ounces of cheese

1/2 cup low-fat cottage cheese

Meat, Fish, Poultry

2-3 servings/day

 

Fats and Oils

In limited amounts

(approximately 5-8 tsp/day)

 

Sweets and Snacks

In limited amounts

 

2 ounces cooked lean meat, fish or poultry

2 ounces of cheese

2 eggs or the equivalent in egg substitutes

1 cup cooked dried beans or peas

2 tbsp peanut butter

1/4 cup tofu (bean curd) Vegetable oil (olive, canola or peanut oils)

Tub margarine*

Fat-free or low-fat salad dressing

Peanut butter and crackers

Cheese and crackers

Vanilla wafers

Plain popcorn, pretzels

 

"Free" foods

 

Raw vegetables

Diet soda

Sugar-free gelatin

Sugar-free syrup

Low-sugar jelly

Sugar-free candy and gum

Unsweetened popsicles

 

This handout provides general guidelines for lowering your blood sugar. The next step is to make an appointment with a registered dietitian, the nutrition expert. A registered dietitian will evaluate different health factors to determine your individual nutritional status; review your diet history targeting carbohydrate (glucose) sources; explain product selection, label reading, cooking methods, menu planning and dining out; and develop an individualized treatment

that will meet your needs.

 

 

Key:

 

- Fat (naturally occurring and added)

 

- Sugars (added)

 

These symbols show that fat and added sugars come mostly from fats, oils and sweets, but can be part of or added to foods from other food groups as well.

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jillybean

I would not recommend following this if you're diabetic unless you're on insulin to cover those carbs...

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Seagal

Diabetic diet? My gosh, sure if you want to see your b.g. go through the roof!

 

 

This is diabetic friendly?

 

 

1 slice of bread

1/2 bagel or English muffin

1 plain rice cake

6 crackers (such as matzo, bread sticks, rye crisps, saltines)

3 graham crackers

3/4 cup ready-to-eat cereal

1/2 cup pasta or rice

1/2 cup corn

Small plain baked potato

1 small pancake

1 6-inch tortilla

1 piece of fresh fruit

1 melon wedge

1/2 cup chopped, cooked, frozen or unsweetened canned fruits

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Determination

Though I question the information to begin with for those that must maintain (or should maintain) a drastically reduced carb diet, it's unethical to copy and paste text from another site without even giving credit to the site that is responsible for providing it.

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Seagal

Perhaps the site quoted was in the link that was edited out by the moderator because it went against forum rules?

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Bountyman
Hey ladies... Was just chking out diabetic diets online n i happen to find these... Take a look! Hope it wl b helpful! All the best.

 

No disrespect meant...but what's the chance you could use a common syntax that we all understand...instead of this teen-chat/text message syntax?

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Determination
Perhaps the site quoted was in the link that was edited out by the moderator because it went against forum rules?

 

Thanks for pointing that out. I'm not in agreement with the original post and am concerned when inaccurate information is regurgitated. However, my apologizes to the OP for my claim of not giving the original site credit as it does sound like that part was edited out.

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