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littlebuddy

How do you tell your children...

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littlebuddy

Hey,

 

I am a kindergarten teacher in Taiwan I am a person with diabetes and one of my students is, too. His mother is really greatful to me because I check his sugars twice a day at school. The thing is I'm not sure how to explain to him that there are certain things he can't have. Today we celebrated Thanksgiving at our school and all the parents brought food in for the kids. One Mom brought a boatload of little cakes and cookies. Naturally this little boy wanted some and my we decided to give him some, it's so hard to say "No," to a kid who just doesn't understand. At any rate after nap he woke and I tested him his BG was 428mg/dl. I then told him that at snack time he can only have a little bit of food and he seemed sad because everyone could have more than him.

 

He is 6 years old now and I want to teach him to test by himself and may be interpret the results. Next year he will be going to elementary school and I worry about that because he may not get the attention that he needs.

 

Any tips on how other parents explained this to their children would be appreciated.

littlebuddy

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liz32

If he's six, then just be strait up honest with him. Tell him the facts of what he has to live with and that it's going to just be part of his life. Oh, and don't expect him to get it. It will take many such teaching sessions for it to become reality for him. Start slow, and take it step by step. Kids are smart and incredibly adaptable. I was adopted and my parents started explaining it to me when I was 3. Obviously I didn't get it at that age but by the time I was old enough to get it, it was so old hat that it wasn't any big deal. This boy will grow into his knowledge and understanding of diabetes as time goes on but the teaching needs to start now. It's no fun being an adult with diabetes so just always remember that it will doubly hard for a child...but they can do. just my 2cents worth hope it helps

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Batty

he's 6 and no ones had him do it himself? i was diganosed when i was six and doing my own needles while i was in the hospital!

 

like Liz said, tell him straight out. it's the only way to do it and then slowly get him to start doing it himself. start getting him to test himself by getting him to poke his own finger and reward him with the usual "good job! you're so brave" kinda thing. then when it gives a result have him look at it and explain to him what it means. so if it's a high number, be like "look, your meter says that your blood sugar is 19. do you know what that means? okay well it's like a game, we're trying to have your blood sugar at 14(obviously you want it lower than that but dont make it look like he's waaay off). wanna see if we can get it to 14 by your next test?" so yeah turn it into like a game kinda so when you're explaining it, it won't be such an overload and then explain to him how you can work to get his bloodsugar down to 14.

 

i figure that would be an easy way. i dont remember what they did with me.

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Batty
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he's 6 and no ones had him do it himself? i was diganosed when i was six and doing my own needles while i was in the hospital!

 

like Liz said, tell him straight out. it's the only way to do it and then slowly get him to start doing it himself. start getting him to test himself by getting him to poke his own finger and reward him with the usual "good job! you're so brave" kinda thing. then when it gives a result have him look at it and explain to him what it means. so if it's a high number, be like "look, your meter says that your blood sugar is 19. do you know what that means? okay well it's like a game, we're trying to have your blood sugar at 14(obviously you want it lower than that but dont make it look like he's waaay off). wanna see if we can get it to 14 by your next test?" so yeah turn it into like a game kinda so when you're explaining it, it won't be such an overload and then explain to him how you can work to get his bloodsugar down to 14.

 

i figure that would be an easy way. i dont remember what they did with me.

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Eri's mom

Eri was six when she was dx'd. We were very straight and upfront with her. Granted, we've gone through a lot with her, but we've never hid anything from her. She has been able to do her own testing and shots as well since the beginning. Granted, getting her to stay in check w/ her carb count at all times isn't always easy.

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Penny
Eri was six when she was dx'd. We were very straight and upfront with her. Granted' date=' we've gone through a lot with her, but we've never hid anything from her. She has been able to do her own testing and shots as well since the beginning. Granted, getting her to stay in check w/ her carb count at all times isn't always easy.[/quote']

We adults have trouble staying in check with the carb counting. How much self control can we expect from a child? At least the adults are in charge of buying the groceries, for Eri. :lollypop: I sometimes think it would be easier for me if someone else did the shopping and prepared my meals.:eating:

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nantomsuethom

I am a school nurse at an elementary school. I have 2 students in kindergarten with diabetes. They have started checking their own bgs recently and we do explain the results and what needs to be done for the results if anything. He does need to learn this early on so that when he goes on to elementary school next year he may have some idea of what he needs to know and do. Their little brains do pick up on this and they learn quick.

 

Also, the most of the other parents know that there are 2 diabetics in the class and when there is a party most of the time they are really good at bringing in food with lower carbs or know the carb counts for boluses.

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