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Guest jamieileana1

My Dr. says I'm "normal" now

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TeddySue

You're not hearing what I'm saying: The meter (not you) has a "margin of error" that means the numbers you got were within that margin... no meter is perfect and you won't get the same number twice from a meter doing a test one minute apart. Your meter (or both) are telling you you have diabetes; that's all. It's up to you to believe it or not and do something or not. I hear you trying to find something to let you believe it's not as bad as it is... one meter is lower, so believe the lower one and it STILL says you have diabetes.

Diabetes is a progressive disease that does not get cured or suddenly go away. It's your choice how you choose to spend the rest of your life with it (not without it). It takes a commitment, a lifestyle permanently changed from before, and acceptance that you can make a difference for yourself: for better or for worse, there's no in-between.

TS

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Mike M

You can easily (and me thinks usually but not always) see a 10-20 pt difference using same meter same strip batch testing minutes apart. These things aren't highly tuned highly accurate (highly expensive) lab devices!

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Seagal

Jamie, besides what others are saying to you, a lot of the difference between meters could be what you ate the day before and how it affects your fasting numbers and the difference between you and your husband is that he is not diabetic, but you are.

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Guest jamieileana1

Mywhole point is HOW can this meter go from being ONLY 2 to 6 points difference then suddenly to over a 20 point different.

 

I understand the error margin but it dont make anysense when it was doing so good to suddenly change so drastically..

 

You're not hearing what I'm saying: The meter (not you) has a "margin of error" that means the numbers you got were within that margin... no meter is perfect and you won't get the same number twice from a meter doing a test one minute apart. Your meter (or both) are telling you you have diabetes; that's all. It's up to you to believe it or not and do something or not. I hear you trying to find something to let you believe it's not as bad as it is... one meter is lower, so believe the lower one and it STILL says you have diabetes.

Diabetes is a progressive disease that does not get cured or suddenly go away. It's your choice how you choose to spend the rest of your life with it (not without it). It takes a commitment, a lifestyle permanently changed from before, and acceptance that you can make a difference for yourself: for better or for worse, there's no in-between.

TS

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Guest jamieileana1

I'm so trying but its hard.

I'm trying to eat the right way as part of the accepting it but even that is frustrating because I feel angry that I cant eat

what I want like I use to. It has literally made life hard.

 

As others have said you need to dump that bucket of denial before it gets to heavy to carry around.

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Guest jamieileana1

I got cha on that one.

Ok...i'm getting it..

I'mseeing my Dr. today at 11:30 to demand to be put on Metformin and probably even a cholesterol med because I know that that is high too...

so I may as well do the whole ball of wax and get it going.

 

Jamie, besides what others are saying to you, a lot of the difference between meters could be what you ate the day before and how it affects your fasting numbers and the difference between you and your husband is that he is not diabetic, but you are.

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MCS

If you truly want to compare meters: Get a clean piece of saran wrap or other plastic, lancet your finger and drop a large drop of blood onto the plastic. Read the drop with one meter, then the other meter, then back to the first meter, then the second meter. You will now have 4 readings, 2 from each meter. You do this in this manner to alleviate any chemicals that may leach from the strip back to the blood drop and give one meter a false positive/false negative over the other meter.

 

When done in this manner the SideKick meter I use gave me 2 pts that were only 1-2pts different, the Prime was only 1-2pts different but 30pts higher than the SideKick.

 

To determine accuracy of the meter you have to test it against a standard. A meter can be highly accurate but have no precision. Precision meaning having the ability to repeat the same number, it doesn't matter if that number is right or wrong. An example would be to have a standard solution of 100mg/dl, you test this solution 3 times and get a 80, 81, 82. These readings would indicate the meter has good precision but the accuracy is off. A different meter and 3 results of 90, 105, 110, would be indicative of an accurate reading with poor precision. A meter with both accuracy and precision would give results like 100, 102, 101. These are just examples, lots of statistical analysis are involved to truly determine accuracy vs precision of two different meters.

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Hooterville

Percentages. It's allowed to be off by a certain percentage. The higher the number the greater the possible difference allowed between two numbers.

 

 

I don't recall the exact percentage that meters are allowed to be off by. For demonstration sake, let's say 10%. You are 100 mg/dl. The meter is allowed to say that you are 90 to 110 and still considered within allowed meter variance. Grow your actual BG to 200 and that 10% becomes 180 to 220. The range grew but the percentage did not. The higher you are, the greater the inaccuracy but not the percentage of inaccuracy.

 

Those cheap Walmart meters and strips are that, cheap, but better than nothing. I know that my simple meter (one touch ultra II) and pricey strips are very accurate. I trust them. If I didn't have insurance and couldn't pay, I'd get the Walmart strips and meter.

 

You'll notice that your husband's numbers were fairly low each time. Yours were not. You have diabetes.

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Guest jamieileana1

I think I will have my clinic test themboth against theirs and see what happens .

I tested after I ate breakfast and reli meter gave me a 131 and my meter gave me 111

I dont know what to believe now...geeez what a joke.

If my clinic wont test both meters then I will try your method.

 

If you truly want to compare meters: Get a clean piece of saran wrap or other plastic, lancet your finger and drop a large drop of blood onto the plastic. Read the drop with one meter, then the other meter, then back to the first meter, then the second meter. You will now have 4 readings, 2 from each meter. You do this in this manner to alleviate any chemicals that may leach from the strip back to the blood drop and give one meter a false positive/false negative over the other meter.

 

When done in this manner the SideKick meter I use gave me 2 pts that were only 1-2pts different, the Prime was only 1-2pts different but 30pts higher than the SideKick.

 

To determine accuracy of the meter you have to test it against a standard. A meter can be highly accurate but have no precision. Precision meaning having the ability to repeat the same number, it doesn't matter if that number is right or wrong. An example would be to have a standard solution of 100mg/dl, you test this solution 3 times and get a 80, 81, 82. These readings would indicate the meter has good precision but the accuracy is off. A different meter and 3 results of 90, 105, 110, would be indicative of an accurate reading with poor precision. A meter with both accuracy and precision would give results like 100, 102, 101. These are just examples, lots of statistical analysis are involved to truly determine accuracy vs precision of two different meters.

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Todd G.

Just FYI, the oft stated factoid that meters are "allowed" to be off by some percentage appears, to the best of my ability to investigate, to be a falsehood. I cannot find any information that would lead me to believe that there is any kind of enforceable mandate from the FDA or any other organization that requires a meter to be accurate. So, basically, you're depending on the quality control of the manufacturer to produce good units and weed out the lemons before shipping.

 

I have jumped on the "allowable error" argument before because as you follow the threads you'll notice that most of the people asking the question then jump on the answer in such a way that it reinforces their belief that their BG180 was really a BG145. You never see them say it was a BG200. Assume your meter is accurate unless you have a reason other than wishful thinking, to assume it's not.

 

For the record, I've now got a collection of 5 different meters. Since I test about 10-12 times a day and pay for my strips I use my el' cheapo Walmart meter the most. Using testing solution, I have determined it is consistently 10pt low compared to my One Touch Ultra, but it is extremely consistent barring a low battery situation, which makes readings so erratic that they become obvious pretty quickly. The One Touch registers +/- 2pt from perfect on the test solution most of the time, so I know it's accurate, but there can be as much as a 5pt +/- spread for some boxes of strips. But again, it seems to be confined to that box of strips. This could be due to some production difference in the strips (most likely different plants, as opposed to actual differences between lots from the same plant), or some trauma the strips endured before they reached me, i.e. excessive heat or cold.

 

But ALL of the meters are within the envelope created by the Walmart meter and the One Touch without allowing for repeatable errors like I mentioned for the Walmart meter, so that's pretty darn good IMO. Allowing for repeatable errors, I'd say the difference is +/- 5pts. @ 180 across the entire collection of meters. Again, I'd say that's pretty amazing.

 

So what I take from this is that a high reading is in fact a high reading, and a low is a low. If you don't like it, change your diet or meds accordingly, but stop believing the meter fairy will magically make everything better. :) Oh, and also, washing your hands before testing will go a long ways towards making your readings accurate. The most tiny particle or film of something carby on your hands will throw the reading waaaayyy off. Been there, done that.

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Ela

I have two meters; OneTouch Ultra that I got through insurance and OneTouch mini that I got in CVS for $17.99 (lanced device & few lancets included). Both need the same strips. And yes, there is difference between them sometimes; I find my old meter more reliable and use it most of the times. And only use the other one when in doubt.

 

I noticed that when my BG are questionable on a high side, the new meter is usually shows lover number, and when I have a "low", it's usually higher. Sometimes there is only a few points difference.

 

In any case no matter how you slice it - 133 OR 113 FBG are both diabetic numbers. And yes, when occasionally (about 2-3 times a year) I have these FBG numbers (and that's usually when I cheat the night before), they are varied on different meters AND/OR EVEN ON DIFFERENT TESTS done at the same time about as much as your tests above. Besides meters inaccuracy, your blood is changing all the time too. There is no use to try to determine what is EXACTLY you're having as 113 is pretty high for FBG in my book already. And that's all you need to know. Because if your BGs were normal you would read constatnly from 70 to 100 and wouldn't worry if it's 79 or 97.

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Guest jamieileana1

My problem with the difference in the meters is that yesterday they were only 2 to 6 points apart but today over 20 points apart.

that has been explained to me that it could be from what I ate the night before and each meter sees it as something different.

I can and will accept the higher reading, meter fairly or not lol, but I just am blown away how fast it changed over night comparing the two meters when yesterday

they were both so close..

 

Just FYI, the oft stated factoid that meters are "allowed" to be off by some percentage appears, to the best of my ability to investigate, to be a falsehood. I cannot find any information that would lead me to believe that there is any kind of enforceable mandate from the FDA or any other organization that requires a meter to be accurate. So, basically, you're depending on the quality control of the manufacturer to produce good units and weed out the lemons before shipping.

 

I have jumped on the "allowable error" argument before because as you follow the threads you'll notice that most of the people asking the question then jump on the answer in such a way that it reinforces their belief that their BG180 was really a BG145. You never see them say it was a BG200. Assume your meter is accurate unless you have a reason other than wishful thinking, to assume it's not.

 

For the record, I've now got a collection of 5 different meters. Since I test about 10-12 times a day and pay for my strips I use my el' cheapo Walmart meter the most. Using testing solution, I have determined it is consistently 10pt low compared to my One Touch Ultra, but it is extremely consistent barring a low battery situation, which makes readings so erratic that they become obvious pretty quickly. The One Touch registers +/- 2pt from perfect on the test solution most of the time, so I know it's accurate, but there can be as much as a 5pt +/- spread for some boxes of strips. But again, it seems to be confined to that box of strips. This could be due to some production difference in the strips (most likely different plants, as opposed to actual differences between lots from the same plant), or some trauma the strips endured before they reached me, i.e. excessive heat or cold.

 

But ALL of the meters are within the envelope created by the Walmart meter and the One Touch without allowing for repeatable errors like I mentioned for the Walmart meter, so that's pretty darn good IMO. Allowing for repeatable errors, I'd say the difference is +/- 5pts. @ 180 across the entire collection of meters. Again, I'd say that's pretty amazing.

 

So what I take from this is that a high reading is in fact a high reading, and a low is a low. If you don't like it, change your diet or meds accordingly, but stop believing the meter fairy will magically make everything better. :) Oh, and also, washing your hands before testing will go a long ways towards making your readings accurate. The most tiny particle or film of something carby on your hands will throw the reading waaaayyy off. Been there, done that.

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MCS

My FBG is on the low side and for several weeks was on the really low side. Waking up in the mid 60's on the SideKick meter and any where from 90-110 on the Prime. This is why I don't use the Prime. Later on in the day when my BG is in the mid 80's the meters will have results with in a few points of each other. I wouldn't trust the Prime if I was injecting insulin or trying to correct a low.

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Hooterville

Jamileanna, forget testing your two meters against your clinic's. I test mine against the lab. I take it with me. Both one touch are either always right on with the lab or within a point or two. This is why I trust my meters and strips. My doctor's meter once tested me in the 150's. I just don't get those numbers. I'd just tested in his reception area moments before. I tested again. Their meter was wrong. It always tested me high. I told them, sorry, your meter is jacked up. Better get it checked. They now have a new one. I only trust testing my meter against lab tests with blood draws.

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Ela
Jamileanna, forget testing your two meters against your clinic's. I test mine against the lab. I take it with me. Both one touch are either always right on with the lab or within a point or two. This is why I trust my meters and strips. My doctor's meter once tested me in the 150's. I just don't get those numbers. I'd just tested in his reception area moments before. I tested again. Their meter was wrong. It always tested me high. I told them, sorry, your meter is jacked up. Better get it checked. They now have a new one. I only trust testing my meter against lab tests with blood draws.

 

Yes, I tested my meter the same way: against the lab result and it's amazing that my meter was either right on the money or only 1 point off! I think that's the best way to find out about your meter.

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Guest jamieileana1

Deep breaths!

Deep Breaths!

 

OMG...just gave in to 2 pc. of Fun candy....wasn't fun when I tested 174!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Guest jamieileana1

Dr. Appt. Update:

bACK IN fEB my Aic was 5.5, wow did I blow that one!

Today in is 5.8.

Oct 15th at home Bayer meter was 5.9

 

My old meter I tested against the "labs" meter:

lab meter was 111, my old one was 116 and the new one was 120

and all with the same drop of blood and all within seconds of the same drop of blood.

 

I seen my old Dr. today (pa) and she let me go back on Metformin.

She said I can take half twice a day or once in the morning..

Any suggestions on when to take it or how?

 

She said I have Metabolic syndroms because I am PRE D, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, high triglycerides

and waist circumfrance is above where it should be for women..

 

she said the lchf is good but to use lean meats which goes against what most here eat.

I asked her if she believes in PRE and she does.

She said there is definitely a cut off from one to the other

however imho I will ALWAYS be at risk for D and if I make it back down to a low aic I know

I diet will never again tolerate pizza and milk...

 

she said to eat whole grains though becaue one needs a "rounded diet"

ok...thats all..

I went straight to pick up Met but pharmacy hadnt even gotten the order in yet, lol,

talk about IN A HURRY!

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Guest jamieileana1

thats exactly what happened to me too! Yesterday each time I tested the prime was within 2 to 6 points and I was quite pleased thinking I had a new meter that was equilivent to my old one and the strips cost was going to be a bonus! so when I tested this a.m. I was shocked to see such a wide gap! Now though again they are CLOSE in numbers like yesterday.

Makes zero sense to me...I thought the exact thing too that what if I had to use insulin, one says no you dont need and the other says you need to>

whats up with that!? I know what to do now with these two..I can still buy strips for my old one and use it for fastings and later in the day switch to the new one...gosh

what a lot of work, ugggh...I guess I should of just stuck with my old one because now i'm confused and saving a few dollars is not woth it...I think I will just go back to my old one

and pooey on this new one..so much for "reli"-ing on it, lol.

 

My FBG is on the low side and for several weeks was on the really low side. Waking up in the mid 60's on the SideKick meter and any where from 90-110 on the Prime. This is why I don't use the Prime. Later on in the day when my BG is in the mid 80's the meters will have results with in a few points of each other. I wouldn't trust the Prime if I was injecting insulin or trying to correct a low.

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Ela

Yeah, I tried those holly whole grains...in my opinion it makes no difference and while they supposed to be healthier, my BGs were worse when I was eating them. So I don't believe in the whole grains anymore.

 

I know that the best is to stop eating wheat at all but for now I'm eating white bread (very little; 5-10 carbs worth in the morning and sometimes at dinner). The same story with rice - brown, white, black (wild) - very little difference. I eat about 2 spoons of mixed rice from Trader Joe's sauteed with some onion, peas and other veggies and it seems OK. I wouldn't even eat that but my son and his girlfriend vegetarians and once a week we have a meal together and we are trying to find some "common" food.

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Hooterville

Two slices of whole wheat bread raise blood glucose more than two tablespoons of pure sugar, according to "Wheat Belly." That's tablespoons, not teaspoons. Ew.

 

For your viewing pleasure, two tablespoons of "sugar" measured and leveled with a measuring spoon and poured on to a plate with a spoon and ring for size reference. Sugar is in quotes above because that's actually salt as I can't find sugar in this house. I have about 1 teaspoon in the bottom of a large canister and that is all. Enjoy that good for you whole wheat, y'all. :D

 

post-43308-139628781922_thumb.jpg

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Ela

Well I never tried to compare sugar to bread and since dx I don't use sugar anyway. But when you say "2 slices" there is a difference. Some breads have 20 carbs PER SLICE and some have 10. And also if you slice your bread yourself (as I do), you can make really thin slices that would be maybe 5 or less carbs worth. For some reason I like some bread for breakfast and it's about 10-15 carbs, which raise my BG to around 110-120 most days and that's how it goes no matter what I eat for breakfast and/or what my FBG is.

 

So no, I don't advertise bread at all and even confess that I'm probably lazy and could have made something from flax or almond flour. Will it change my BG? I doubt because as I said - if it's just eggs and bacon or almond pancakes or even just green veggies with some meat - I'm going to end up in 110-120 range anyway. But it's just me and for somebody else it could be a totally different story.

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Hooterville

Ela, I wasn't addressing you specifically. Jamieleanna said her PA told her she needs to eat whole grains to have a "rounded diet." The whole business of professionals pushing diabetics to eat "healthy whole grains" based on ADA guidelines is something that annoys me. The two slices of whole wheat bread would just be two average slices of "healthy whole wheat bread." Nothing special or lower carb. Just your run of the mill "healthy whole wheat" bread. Those two slices of average whole wheat bread would fit right in the ADA's guidlines for carbs per meal. :)

 

I don't even know if you'd posted yet when I started mine. Typing, picture taking, emailing myself the pic, attaching it to a post, etc.... :)

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