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bardley

Lazy Receptors

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bardley

...I was talking with a doctor recently about diabetes type 2 and the impact of DEW (diet, exercise, weight control). He made a comment that I thought might benefit others--lazy receptors. I don't know how many people this relates to but his medical theory is that some people's receptors are lazy and sometimes need a bit of slapping around to do their job (i.e. - exercise). I thought that this was in interesting perception of at least a small portion of the diabetic community and worth sharing with all of you.

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jwags

I do think my insulin receptors are sluggish, but exercise really doesn't help much. I have exercised all my life and am quite thin. My problem seems more with my liver dumping glucose when I am really not low. Then my sluggish receptors are slow to release insulin. Metformin does help as does low carb diet.

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jims_forum
I do think my insulin receptors are sluggish, but exercise really doesn't help much. I have exercised all my life and am quite thin. My problem seems more with my liver dumping glucose when I am really not low. Then my sluggish receptors are slow to release insulin. Metformin does help as does low carb diet.

 

For me; liver dumping excess glucose lards up muscle cells and then insulin receptors are down graded by cells to reduce glucose input.

 

For me metformin has been a god send and I take it in smaller doses sufficient to cut liver off strung around clock. For me 500mg doses of standard met are sufficient to cut off excess liver glucose release. Taking one dose a day only holds liver off 1 to 3 hours. huge dose tiny effigy time. longer time met is up to strength in blood effects its final efficiency.

 

good luck and best wishes.

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jwags

I find I benefit more from the metformin from 11 pm to 11 am. So I split my 2550 mg in 3x850 doses and take them between those hours. The other half of the day my receptors seem to work better and I don't need the nelp of metformin. I find 850 will work 4-5 hours for me .

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jims_forum
I find I benefit more from the metformin from 11 pm to 11 am. So I split my 2550 mg in 3x850 doses and take them between those hours. The other half of the day my receptors seem to work better and I don't need the nelp of metformin. I find 850 will work 4-5 hours for me .

 

Lucky you. I get 2 hours of the typical 1to 3 hour effigy time.

 

I take my doses 5:45am; 11:00am; 4:00pm; dawn effect nailing 10:00pm and 12:00am these are all 500 mg doses. That size of dose can vary on body to body. As long as one keeps the excess liver glucose release down, the skeletal muscles/fat cells and their temporary glucose storage do not get overloaded and insulin receptors do not get downgraded to block further glucose transfer and poisoning the muscle/fat cells.

 

best wishes and good luck and thankyou for sharing.

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GrammaBear
...I was talking with a doctor recently about diabetes type 2 and the impact of DEW (diet, exercise, weight control). He made a comment that I thought might benefit others--lazy receptors. I don't know how many people this relates to but his medical theory is that some people's receptors are lazy and sometimes need a bit of slapping around to do their job (i.e. - exercise). I thought that this was in interesting perception of at least a small portion of the diabetic community and worth sharing with all of you.

 

Thank you for sharing bardley. Even though I have Type 1 diabetes, I also have a fair amount of insulin resistance - so I take Metformin ER 500 mg three times a day with meals. I find that it is easier for me to control my bg during the daytime hours, but come late afternoon into early evening all bets are off. I have an insulin pump and my basal rates from 5 p.m. to 6 a.m. are much higher than daytime rates. Most aggravating to try and control.

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