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JanetP

Different flours

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JanetP

Can you more experience diabetic bakers out there give m some advice on different flours to use? I'm tired of almond meal and use coconut flour in small amounts combined with it in some recipes.

I've seen a lot of Paleo recipes calling for garbanzo flour but it strikes me as too carby. I also use flax meal. I got the Wheat Belly Cookbook and have been looking through the recipes, everything but his breads looks good. I tend to be more of a baker than a regular cook. I used to love to make homemade breads.

 

I did find an almond flour on a site called digestive wellness.com that seems to be finer ground than the Honeyville Grains almond meal I have been using. Have any of you tried that? If so, what do you think?

 

Thanks,

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k_dub

I use almond flour and coconut flour regularly. Depending on the recipe, I use finely ground almond "flour" for baking and I use coarse almond meal for other things (i.e., my non-cereal cereal, and breading). I do really well with both flours BG wise, but I find that I can get sick if I eat too much almond/nut flours. I make some low carb pumpkin Paleo muffins that have both almond flour and coconut flour in them.

 

I've also used ground hazelnuts and pecans for low carb crusts. I also sneak in ground flaxseed meal (sometimes) into recipes, but it's not something (to me) that tastes good as the sole flour in a recipe.

 

Any of these nut flours are easy to make yourself in a food processor or quality blender. Making it yourself allows you to choose, each time, how coarse or fine you want it to be for that recipe. I'm lazy about my nut flours. I buy them. I buy almond flour in bulk (Bob's Red Mill finely ground) from Amazon. The 4 package box lasts me about 6mos.

 

If you find a recipe claiming to be Paleo that uses garbonzo flour, it's not Paleo. Paleo doesn't allow for legumes (chickpeas/garbonzos), even in flour form. Paleo diet proponents would cite lecithins and phytic acid as being harmful to your gut microbiota and Paleo is all about healthy the gut. Here is a good summary of why legumes aren't encouraged on Paleo. The Weston A Price Foundation diet is similar to Paleo but allows for soaked and sprouted legumes only (which garbonzo flour would not be).

 

Since the gluten free health craze has started, there are a lot of alternative flours out there. I.e., teff flour, tapioca flour, potato starch, soy flour, garbonzo flour, etc, etc, etc. Some are going to be Paleo (tapioca is Paleo) and some will be low carb, and some will be neither.

 

And even within the Paleo community, there are sects of people that don't encourage the use of nut flours, etc for baked treats except on special occasions only (Whole 30, for example).

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jwags

I just got the garbanzo flour to make the bread in The Wheat Belly Cookbook. I haven't made it yet. I seem to do OK with other beans. I eat chilli, hummus and bean salad so why not bread made with beans. I used to use quinoa flour and flakes and may stsrt trying it again.

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k_dub

Jwags, let us know how the garbonzo bean flour works for you!

 

I *think* I am one of those people who doesn't do well BG-wise (and maybe gut health-wise) with most legumes. Definitely one of those YMMV things. I think it would be good for others to know how it works out for you and if the have another option for low carb bread.

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dice22

if i did my own baking I use Atkins All purpose baking mix for my bicutis , breads & muffins; YOU CAN GET THIS ON-LINE AT THE DRUGSTORE.CIOM

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Book Woman

I baked low carb cheddar and garlic biscuits for dinner with coconut flour and amaranth flour. My BG spiked to 146. Is this spike the amaranth flour? I made coconut flour muffins this weekend with no spikes. It is the baked goods that I miss the most.

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JanetP
if i did my own baking I use Atkins All purpose baking mix for my bicutis , breads & muffins; YOU CAN GET THIS ON-LINE AT THE DRUGSTORE.CIOM

 

I finally looked it up. It contains both wheat and soy, 2 things I try to avoid. If it works for you, great!

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jwags

Usually when I use Almond, coconut or flaxseed flours I get 0 spike. When I eat low carb or sprouted breads I so get a 20-30 point spike. I go hot and cold on LC baking. Sometimes I will take a couple month break from it and then restart. I find almond flour by itself will give you a dry product. But mixing flours often helps. You can also grind any type of seed-pumpkin, sunflower, sesame, hemp and make flour.

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GrammaBear
I baked low carb cheddar and garlic biscuits for dinner with coconut flour and amaranth flour. My BG spiked to 146. Is this spike the amaranth flour? I made coconut flour muffins this weekend with no spikes. It is the baked goods that I miss the most.

 

Your last sentence describes how I feel a lot of the time. My husband is not diabetic and he dearly loves baked goods. Sometimes I know he misses having some of the things that I 'used' to bake. I've been wondering if there is a workable substitution for wheat flour baked goods? Can a combination of some of the 'newer' flours on the market work for wheat flour? When we go to the large market near our town, I'm surprised at some of the flours in the 'specialty' section. Sometimes I also get tired of using just almond or coconut flour. I do love jwags blueberry muffins though :)

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Book Woman
Your last sentence describes how I feel a lot of the time. My husband is not diabetic and he dearly loves baked goods. Sometimes I know he misses having some of the things that I 'used' to bake. I've been wondering if there is a workable substitution for wheat flour baked goods? Can a combination of some of the 'newer' flours on the market work for wheat flour? When we go to the large market near our town, I'm surprised at some of the flours in the 'specialty' section. Sometimes I also get tired of using just almond or coconut flour. I do love jwags blueberry muffins though :)

 

FLOUR CHART: How Gluten Free Flours Compare for Carbs and Protein Content | All the Love-- Without the Wheat

 

 

Understanding Gluten Free Flours | My Real Food Life

 

Here are a couple of places I found about different flours. Gluten free uses some things we don't - like sugar, etc. but the info about the different flours is good.

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Book Woman
I use almond flour and coconut flour regularly. Depending on the recipe, I use finely ground almond "flour" for baking and I use coarse almond meal for other things (i.e., my non-cereal cereal, and breading). I do really well with both flours BG wise, but I find that I can get sick if I eat too much almond/nut flours. I make some low carb pumpkin Paleo muffins that have both almond flour and coconut flour in them.

 

I've also used ground hazelnuts and pecans for low carb crusts. I also sneak in ground flaxseed meal (sometimes) into recipes, but it's not something (to me) that tastes good as the sole flour in a recipe.

 

Any of these nut flours are easy to make yourself in a food processor or quality blender. Making it yourself allows you to choose, each time, how coarse or fine you want it to be for that recipe. I'm lazy about my nut flours. I buy them. I buy almond flour in bulk (Bob's Red Mill finely ground) from Amazon. The 4 package box lasts me about 6mos.

 

If you find a recipe claiming to be Paleo that uses garbonzo flour, it's not Paleo. Paleo doesn't allow for legumes (chickpeas/garbonzos), even in flour form. Paleo diet proponents would cite lecithins and phytic acid as being harmful to your gut microbiota and Paleo is all about healthy the gut. Here is a good summary of why legumes aren't encouraged on Paleo. The Weston A Price Foundation diet is similar to Paleo but allows for soaked and sprouted legumes only (which garbonzo flour would not be).

 

Since the gluten free health craze has started, there are a lot of alternative flours out there. I.e., teff flour, tapioca flour, potato starch, soy flour, garbonzo flour, etc, etc, etc. Some are going to be Paleo (tapioca is Paleo) and some will be low carb, and some will be neither.

 

And even within the Paleo community, there are sects of people that don't encourage the use of nut flours, etc for baked treats except on special occasions only (Whole 30, for example).

 

Kelly - what is the Paleo diet? Sounds interesting!

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