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dowling gram
13 hours ago, TX_Clint said:

I had considered a retirement condo in Galveston but the fees are a killer. I have a stand alone cottage in Galveston to retire to instead. This may occur soon, this year at any rate. I love the smaller community.

 

Exactly what I thought. Even retirement homes are expensive and I can get me grass cut and driveway plowed for a fraction of those condo fees. I get rides into town with the seni

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TX_Clint

No driveway plowing in Galveston. I’ve also just been notified that with my employer buying another company and merging the two operations my job is going away. So I opted to take the offer of 16 weeks severence pay and retire. Now I just have to move the tenants out of the Galveston house, clean, paint and repair then move back to the island. Then sell my commuter car, yeah! I am at full retirement age so I’ve been planing this for awhile. I’m just a bit nervous about pulling the plug. 

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dowling gram
1 hour ago, dowling gram said:

 

Exactly what I thought. Even retirement homes are expensive and I can get me grass cut and driveway plowed for a fraction of those condo fees. I get rides into town with the seni

 

I was cut off and this was posted before I had finished. I don't know if site maintinence was the cause What I was about to say was

 

Exactly what I thought. Even retirement homes are expensive and most want to include meals. I can't see me cooped up and not having a garden to tend or a greenhouse to grow plants. I can get my grass cut and driveway plowed for a fraction of those condo fees. I get rides into town with the senior Red Cross ride program for a nominal fee. We have a golden age club nearby with lots of activities. I have my friends and painting buddies near me. Our community center is only a few blocks away and has exercise and lots of activities which cost a reasonable rate or are free. I have great neighbours who lend a hand when it's needed. I have all the amenities of a retirement home right here. I can live in my house very cheaply and comfortably and not have to worry about how much money I spend

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dowling gram
25 minutes ago, TX_Clint said:

No driveway plowing in Galveston. I’ve also just been notified that with my employer buying another company and merging the two operations my job is going away. So I opted to take the offer of 16 weeks severence pay and retire. Now I just have to move the tenants out of the Galveston house, clean, paint and repair then move back to the island. Then sell my commuter car, yeah! I am at full retirement age so I’ve been planing this for awhile. I’m just a bit nervous about pulling the plug. 

 

If you've been planning it you should be fine. A lot of men haven't given retirement a thought. They have no hobbies or activities to fill the time so they are lost without that job to go to. If you haven't then look around at what your community has to offer. Examine your interests and find something you can take up.

 

I've heard many women complain about their husband's retirement. They have nothing to do so they try to take over household chores that their wives are used to doing. Oh they never go for unpleasant tasks like cleaning the bathroom or scrubbing the floors they want the jobs that women don't mind doing like cooking or grocery shopping. It's ok if you really didn't like doing those things but if you do--watch out

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don1942

Adult communities (55 plus) with at least 1000 homes offer plenty of activities to keep retirees busy and out of each other’s hair. My wife is starting to complain that I have too many commitments that are starting to interfere with our together time. Our community is exclusively independent living.

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TX_Clint
3 hours ago, dowling gram said:

 

If you've been planning it you should be fine. A lot of men haven't given retirement a thought. They have no hobbies or activities to fill the time so they are lost without that job to go to. If you haven't then look around at what your community has to offer. Examine your interests and find something you can take up.

 

I've heard many women complain about their husband's retirement. They have nothing to do so they try to take over household chores that their wives are used to doing. Oh they never go for unpleasant tasks like cleaning the bathroom or scrubbing the floors they want the jobs that women don't mind doing like cooking or grocery shopping. It's ok if you really didn't like doing those things but if you do--watch out

No concern for those types of issues here. My wife is handicapped so I do it all already.

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Kit

Off topic, but I am curious because I have heard the same thing so many times and it has never made sense to me.  Why men and not women?  I've either worked full time or full time student and part time worker since I was in high school.  Why would a guy have any more problem figuring out to do with himself after retirement than I would?  And trust me, if I were retired, my only barrier would be income.  Heck, my current backlog of unwatched tv shows, movies, unplayed games, unread books, and similar would last me years just on their own.  And none of that counts all of the hobbies I've dropped over the years due to lack of time.  And I am a professional with an education.  Its not a job I go to for a pay check, it is a career

 

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dowling gram
1 hour ago, Kit said:

Off topic, but I am curious because I have heard the same thing so many times and it has never made sense to me.  Why men and not women?  I've either worked full time or full time student and part time worker since I was in high school.  Why would a guy have any more problem figuring out to do with himself after retirement than I would?  And trust me, if I were retired, my only barrier would be income.  Heck, my current backlog of unwatched tv shows, movies, unplayed games, unread books, and similar would last me years just on their own.  And none of that counts all of the hobbies I've dropped over the years due to lack of time.  And I am a professional with an education.  Its not a job I go to for a pay check, it is a career

 

I don't know why men and not women. Maybe it's the fact that women are more flexible and tend to have female friends that motivate them. or it could be the fact that they do have interests that are not related to the job. Maybe when you retire some of those hobbies you gave up for lack of time will perk your interest again.

 

Some men live and breath their job and have never tried anything that is not job related. If they do have free time it is spent watching sports so when the job or career goes it leaves a big hole

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adiantum

It was like that in the days when my father retired  but I dont think that happens to men that are at retirement age these days. 

There is more money around these days which allows an easier lifestyle &   more activities like touring, computers and sports.

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dowling gram
26 minutes ago, adiantum said:

It was like that in the days when my father retired  but I dont think that happens to men that are at retirement age these days. 

There is more money around these days which allows an easier lifestyle &   more activities like touring, computers and sports.

Maybe I'm showing my age but I know many men who were like that. I agree that the younger men are not prone to be like that. I know my son has great plans for after retirement. It must be the blurring of the roles in marriage these days. My son already does most of the cooking and they share household chores. They have shared interests and some they like to do on their own. I can't see either of them being bored after retirement

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adiantum

Clint will have a great time.. retiring in Galveston certainly  is the place to do it.

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Kit
41 minutes ago, dowling gram said:

Maybe I'm showing my age but I know many men who were like that. I agree that the younger men are not prone to be like that. I know my son has great plans for after retirement. It must be the blurring of the roles in marriage these days. My son already does most of the cooking and they share household chores. They have shared interests and some they like to do on their own. I can't see either of them being bored after retirement

 

That's how it is with Mr Fuzzy and I.  We have our own interests as well as sharing a lot of interests as well.  We split house hold chores, mostly not along the traditional gender lines.  I'm likely to be the one who drives when we go somewhere together.  I'm also the one to do a lot of basic house hold repairs, mow the lawn, etc.  He handles the majority of the budget (though we are both aware of what's going on) and does the majority of our grocery shopping.  We both clean, he's not allowed to cook (unless its simple microwave) or do laundry as I like having a house that isn't flooded or burnt to the ground.  I'm not allowed to touch our entertainment system past the basics of turning it on or off and changing volume or channel.  We tend to argue about the home network.

 

Anyway, neither one of us can comprehend not knowing what to do with ourselves after retirement.  :)

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meyery2k

Couple interesting pictures from today's bike ride.  I believe this is a species of noddie.

 

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I was at this point of land in the distance earlier today...

 

5aa5e38d29be2_20180311_121309(1024x576).thumb.jpg.a3a195faacb66a514224437dec4f5793.jpg

 

 

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Hammer

I think that the reason that men are more prone to having a difficult time with retirement, is because most men link themselves to their job.  I remember reading an article that said, if you ask a man to define himself, he will say that he is a plumber, an electrician, a business man, whatever.  If you ask a woman to define herself, she would say that she is a housekeeper, a mother, her family's cook and cleaner, etc.  A man defines himself by his work, whereas a woman defines herself by what she does in her personal life.  Of course, this is not true of all men and women, but from what I read, it seemed to be the majority of both sexes.

 

For those of you who are not retired yet, let me tell you this....no matter how many things you think you will do that will keep you busy when you retire, they will only last a brief time.  This is why....right now, you are not retired, so you only have a limited amount of time to do those things, but when you retire, you will have 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to do those things, and you will catch up really fast.  You can have hobbies, work in community affairs, whatever, but those things only take up a portion of your time.  I mean, if you collect stamps, coins, enjoy knitting, assembling puzzles, reading, whatever, you can only do that for so long before you have to stop and do something else.  For example, if you enjoy reading, can you read one book after the next without stopping?  No one can, so once you finish one book (or maybe two), you'll want to do something else, so what can you do?  You will find that some of the things that you like now, will become too much trouble to do after you retire.  While you would still enjoy them, it would take too much energy to do them when you retire, so you no longer do them.

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buddy7

Fourth time Jury Service??

Since May 2009 to date, I’ve been summons 4 times to do jury service, all at the same Crown Courts. My second jury service was sometime between 2015/16. Had my own records for the period May 2009, but did not have any records of my own for the period 2015/16 not exactly, so I trust they did. Funny, they get so precise about actual dates, One would’ve thought, this is not the age of computers, having to give exact dates for your past jury service, just peed me off a little. However! From my experience jury service last for about 2 weeks. As a rule, they normally start on a Monday morning for 2 weeks, finishes on a Friday evening.

 

My third service: I had just finished my second service that Friday evening, got home pleased with myself it was all over. Came the Monday morning, got another summons to report for jury service, dated in 4 weeks’ time. Needless to say panic quickly set in, with a bit of a sprint to the telephone, explain myself fully, making a point, (you guys have made a mistake). I had just finished a full 2 week period of jury service Friday last. Still, on the phone, they must’ve looked at their computer, (if they had one) to find I was totally correct. I was told, “an error had occurred, please ignore that summons, and do not attend court for jury service at this time”.

 

Years down the road, my fourth time, some 3 weeks ago received yet another summons for jury service on Monday 23rd April 2018 for 2 weeks, again I phone their office, asking to be excused from jury service on medical grounds. Of whom I’ve spoken too, they asked me to fill in the forms, and return them with an attached letter, given the medical reasons why I needed to be excused from jury service, also my wife’s medical condition if any. I did this. Owing to the delayed response from them, I rang their office on Friday. They said, “Sorry for the delay responding to my letter, you have now been excused from jury service for the period beginning 23rd April 2018, do not attend courts”.

 

What a complete palaver!

Noted! The unprofessionalism of the Jury Central Summoning Bureau somewhat sucks and outdated.

 

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buddy7
4 hours ago, Hammer said:

I think that the reason that men are more prone to having a difficult time with retirement, is because most men link themselves to their job.  I remember reading an article that said, if you ask a man to define himself, he will say that he is a plumber, an electrician, a business man, whatever.  If you ask a woman to define herself, she would say that she is a housekeeper, a mother, her family's cook and cleaner, etc.  A man defines himself by his work, whereas a woman defines herself by what she does in her personal life.  Of course, this is not true of all men and women, but from what I read, it seemed to be the majority of both sexes.

 

For those of you who are not retired yet, let me tell you this....no matter how many things you think you will do that will keep you busy when you retire, they will only last a brief time.  This is why....right now, you are not retired, so you only have a limited amount of time to do those things, but when you retire, you will have 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to do those things, and you will catch up really fast.  You can have hobbies, work in community affairs, whatever, but those things only take up a portion of your time.  I mean, if you collect stamps, coins, enjoy knitting, assembling puzzles, reading, whatever, you can only do that for so long before you have to stop and do something else.  For example, if you enjoy reading, can you read one book after the next without stopping?  No one can, so once you finish one book (or maybe two), you'll want to do something else, so what can you do?  You will find that some of the things that you like now, will become too much trouble to do after you retire.  While you would still enjoy them, it would take too much energy to do them when you retire, so you no longer do them.

 

My Dear Hammer, most of what you said made so much sense, I’m going through the same experiences as we speak, retired 21st April 2017, loved my job as a Quality control manager, and wouldn’t have given it up “for all the tea in China”, but when you’re my age, your body tells you enough! Is enough. And you’re quite right all the jobs you had proposed to do after retirement, never lasts forever, so some days you’re playing with your thumbs, wondering what to do next.

 

But as time goes by you find yourself a strategy on things to do during retirement, and this works for me. And when money is not an object, boy, those strategies make retirement life a darn-sight better.

 

 

Edited by buddy7

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dowling gram
24 minutes ago, buddy7 said:

And you’re quite right all the jobs you had proposed to do after retirement, never lasts forever, so some days you’re playing with your thumbs, wondering what to do next.

 

I have a suggestion--volunteer. Pick something you believe in and look for a way to put your skills to work. Charities are always looking for volunteers and it's no surprise that a lot of them are retirees. With volunteering you feel good about yourself that you are making a difference. I have something that takes me out of the house for a couple of hours each weekday. Some days it is volunteering and some days it is pursuing my interests. It makes me feel better to see and interact with people for a portion of the day and I seldom twiddle my thumbs looking for something to do.

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Hammer
11 hours ago, dowling gram said:

I have a suggestion--volunteer. Pick something you believe in and look for a way to put your skills to work. Charities are always looking for volunteers and it's no surprise that a lot of them are retirees. With volunteering you feel good about yourself that you are making a difference. I have something that takes me out of the house for a couple of hours each weekday. Some days it is volunteering and some days it is pursuing my interests. It makes me feel better to see and interact with people for a portion of the day and I seldom twiddle my thumbs looking for something to do.

This is so true!  When you join a charity, or some other non-profit organization, it feels good knowing that you are involved in something that is helping others.  As the secretary of my ham radio club, and a member of HEARS (Hospital Emergency Amateur Radio Service), I get involved with other radio club members, who are also involved with HEARS, and we participate in practice exercises at the local hospital (we have a radio room there).  The practice exercises prepare us for the possibility of some local disaster, where all other forms of communication are down.  

 

By participating in various activities that involve ham radio, it gets me out of the house, and allows me to interact with other ham radio operators, since we all share a common interest. (I've been a ham radio operator for 53 years).

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buddy7
22 hours ago, dowling gram said:

I have a suggestion--volunteer. Pick something you believe in and look for a way to put your skills to work. Charities are always looking for volunteers and it's no surprise that a lot of them are retirees. With volunteering you feel good about yourself that you are making a difference. I have something that takes me out of the house for a couple of hours each weekday. Some days it is volunteering and some days it is pursuing my interests. It makes me feel better to see and interact with people for a portion of the day and I seldom twiddle my thumbs looking for something to do.

 

Thanks, DG I appreciate your thoughtful suggestions, and with the help of my daughter who at some time after my retirement mentioned some of your ideas, and I have no doubt this has to be the way forward for me. Don’t get me wrong I’m far from being bored, at most times can always find something to do, mostly un-interested things, that’s not me. In my working days, I have always interacted and mixed with people and will like so much as a retiree to get myself into voluntary work of some kind, to pursue an interest of my own and meet a calibre of people who share the same interest.

 

One of my daughters is a social worker, and at some stage, we’ll get together for a chat and hopefully, with her contacts, she’ll be more than helpful in getting me started and active again as I once use too.

 

Can only say thank you again, DG, sometimes in life we just need that little push?

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meyery2k

Well - I have my first engagement as a guest speaker outside of my Rotary club to share my journey with diabetes.  It isn't until July but I am looking forward to it.  Hopefully someone will listen and benefit.

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dowling gram
14 minutes ago, meyery2k said:

Well - I have my first engagement as a guest speaker outside of my Rotary club to share my journey with diabetes.  It isn't until July but I am looking forward to it.  Hopefully someone will listen and benefit.

 

Great meyery. If you speak as well as you write you may just help someone. Your story alone should get to someone and the more we can spread the word the better living with diabetes will become.

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adiantum

Yay Mike, your success & your attitude will be appreciated by all that hear your story , as it will to those that relay it.

You made the changes & are glowing with enthusiasm for life,  because of it .

 

I'm sure even those in Rotary have mentioned your success to others within their other groups & families.

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adiantum

I opened up with google this morning & thought they were having a carb attack with the images on their home page.

 

Thats the first time in my life that I've been wrong.

Theyre not celebrating  pies.. theyre celebrating Pi Day...well done Google

I never think maths before coffee

image.jpeg.e4d2b85265abdf891a1dfebe22569316.jpeg

 

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meyery2k

Lee - You could be our Google home page spy lol...

 

I remember on 1/1/2000 keeping an eye on the news in Australia and New Zealand since it would provide a clues as to what the US might have encountered.

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