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meyery2k
adiantum

Praising the Greeks for inventing Haloumi cheese.

I've made chips/french fries of it, its great in salads, Ive pan fried small squares & taken it  on  picnics, but last nights dinner was just grilled haloumi with asparagus.

It holds its shape  & is chewy & very versatile .

https://www.olivemagazine.com/recipes/vegetarian/best-halloumi-recipes/

borrowed pic..

Halloumi Cheese Nutrition: How Healthy Is It?

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meyery2k

I am taking Keppra, an anti-seizure medicine.  Since I have come home Tuesday, I have had a headache on the right side of my head.  Sometimes a "1, sometimes a "3" but always there.  I mentioned it to my PCP Friday and he conceded it could be that I was still battling a viral meningitis, there could be a mechanical cause from the scar tissue on the burrhole, or it could be a side effect of Keppra.  He gave me a neurological exam and tested my reflexes and, in that regard, I passed.  He sympathetically explained this might be the new normal for a little while which I found a little depressing.  I was determined to game on since the only alternative I am aware of at this point is not an interesting one.

 

Tim took me around and did my errands Saturday.  Nothing remarkable except the headache.  My daughter wanted to come over and visit me but I explained I was feeling a little tired.  The truth being I was irritable from the headache which I could not combat with acetaminophen.  A cool compress would provide short relief.

 

Around midnight, the headache migrated to my temple area and ramped up to a "4" and there seemed to be nothing I could do about it.  Warm compress, cool compress, and acetaminophen had no effect.  I just laid down and tried to sleep through it as best I could.  I couple hours later, I awoke and no headache.  I cried in relief to have some respite, even a temporary one.  So far, I have not had any headache today (over 12 hours).  I determined to just pamper myself with rest, binge watching Netflix, and indulging a little more heavily in NSA ice cream than is probably good for me.

 

I am going to Kala's house to have a roast and I made coleslaw and cream-cheese stuffed celery.  As of this writing, no headache and hoping/dreading the next few hours lol...

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janice21475

Mike, My wish is that your visit at your daughter's was uneventful and that you are home and resting. Keep us posted. I will pray for you. Janice

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meyery2k

@janice21475 - Thank you.  Due to the time difference, I will be heading out soon.  It is just shy of 6PM here.  So far no headache (about 16 hours so far) and I cannot emphasize how grateful I am about that.  Having a headache makes me worry I might have another event.  I am hoping this was caused by illness.  My son actually commented Saturday that I looked very unwell before I headed out.  Apparently, I am looking and behaving much closer to what is normal for me.  From what I understand talking to some friends that have been through this there is actually a good chance I might never be troubled with this again.  A significant number of these are never positively diagnosed with a cause because the brain is such a complicated organ.

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adiantum

Mike your never going to forget this Remembrance Day & we all hope you are never bothered with it again.

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meyery2k

One full day with no headaches.  Finally, I seem to be going in the direction I want to.  With all the spare time I have found, I have been checking out viral meningitis on the Internet.  While not usually as serious as the bacterial variety, there are some stories where people have had significant bouts of it.  I am not 100% sure if I had meningitis or encephalitis but the symptoms seemed to match quite well and that was the working diagnosis in the ER.  When I came home, I felt great, then seemed to go downhill a little, but seem to be bouncing back.  I suppose it is possible the steroids were masking the problem since they would reduce swelling.  When I stopped taking them, the headaches flared up temporarily.  I don't know for certain but it would fit in with my understanding upon how these things work.

 

I think medicine is a wonderful art that incorporates science.  It is to me, however, an art.  I think there is a tendency to mask symptoms and pronounce the trouble as solved rather than to try and work out what might actually be wrong with a patient and seeing if the underlying cause can be solved.  Diabetes really brought that home to me.  The emphasis is to control glucose no matter what when there could be other factors that are equally important such as hyperinsulinism or insulin resistance going on.  The existing model of health insurance in the US, the spectre of malpractice suits, and the closed minded thinking of large institutions will not allow for an easy or quick solution to this.

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Kit

@meyery2k  Glad to hear you have been headache free for a day.  I really hope it keeps up for you.

 

The year before I started collage, three students at that university died from bacterial meningitis.  The incoming class was required to be vaccinated during orientation.

 

So while I do not understand all the potential variations and how serious they can be, I do know at least some forms can be very serious.

 

I have to agree that the medical establishment is more interested in treating symptoms instead of actual causes.  I actually ran across something interesting but I'm not sure where, may have been a Peter Attia podcast in that medicine does not follow the scientific method.

 

For those not familiar with what the scientific method, it is basically the following.

 

A theory is developed, usually from observation or (in some fields) pure mathematics.

From there an experiment is designed and then performed to prove that hypothesis.

Results are published and subject to peer review. 

Other scientists will critique the experiment design pointing out potential flaws, such as other factors which could cause the results received.

Other groups will attempt to repeat the experiment.  Repeatibility is a vital factor.

If necessary, rinse and repeat a few times.

 

Einstein is an example of a theoretical physicist.  We weren't able to design experiments to prove his theories until well after his death.

 

The medical field, however, go by what is called "evidence based medicine", which is apparently not what it sounds like.  I can't remember the details, but can have some serious flaws.  Actually I did run across this:

https://www.bmj.com/content/362/bmj.k2799/rr-1

One quote from the above that I feel makes an excellent point.

"No evidence of effect is not the same as evidence of no effect."

 

So if no experiment has been performed to show how a low carb diet helps diabetics, it is treated the same as if the experiment has been run and shown to have no helpful affect.  And if the community is already biased towards believing that a low carb diet is not helpful or even harmful, no experiments are run.  And most funding for these studies comes from groups who benefit from the status quo.

 

I think the ACCORD study is a great example.  As soon as the treatment group started having negative affects, it was stopped (understandable) but then instead of trying to figure out why the results were worse, they made the assumption that aggressive control in diabetics caused heart attacks with no interest in looking at why.

 

And then this filters down to the clinical level and a doctor yelling at me that there was no reason for me to have an A1C under 7.0 and that I was going to give myself a heart attack.  Just because I take my condition seriously.

 

What no one really did, was peer review the experiment and point out potential flaws, such as the methods that were used to gain that aggressive control, large amounts of insulin (either by stimulating insulin production or injecting insulin itself).  or the medication that had been banned in multiple countries due to increase heart attack and stroke risk.

Edited by Kit

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Hammer

Yesterday, Monday, I decided to change out my tractor's mowing deck for my snow blower attachment.  Monday was a warm day with little wind, so I figured that it would be a great day to swap out the two attachments.  Being an old man with limited mobility, proved to be a problem.  While I was able to change out the two attachments, it was very difficult.  When you are my age, and you have to lay on the ground to attach things, then have to get up....well, getting up isn't all that easy.  I am seriously thinking about having the dealer come out and do the swap for me.  I don't know what it will cost, but as long as I don't have to lay on  the ground, then get up, well, it would be worth the cost.

 

This year, they are predicting a very harsh winter, with lots of snow, which is why I wanted to change out the mowing deck with the snow blower.  Years ago, I was caught off guard with a freak snow storm, and I didn't have my snow blower attached.  It was called the Halloween snowstorm, because it happened at the end of October, and we NEVER get a snowstorm that early in the year.  I mowed the grass on Friday afternoon, came in and took a shower, then read the headlines on the internet, and they were calling for a heavy snow storm that evening.  Jeez, it was 70 degrees, so how could we have a snowstorm Friday night, but we did.  It was a wet, heavy snow, and it damaged a lot of my trees.  Since I didn't have the snowblower attached to my garden tractor, there was no way that I could clear the snow off of my driveway.  That was when I decided that I would attach my snowblower to my tractor, regardless of what the weather report said, just so I wouldn't be caught off guard again.  

 

My snowblower will clean off my driveway in less than 5 minutes, and remember...my driveway is 140 feet long. (42.6 meters).  If I tried to manually shovel my driveway off with my bad back, well, it would never get done.  So, again, I am now ready for whatever winter brings....even a blizzard!  We had a blizzard a few years ago, and knowing the we would be hit with a 36 inch (.91 meters) snowfall, I went out in the middle of the snowstorm, and used my snowblower to clear off the snow that had already fallen.  I did this because, if I had just waited for the full 36 inches of snow to fall, it would have been too much for my snowblower to handle, but by going out in the middle of the storm and clearing off the already fallen snow, it made it easier for me to clear off the snow  that fell after I had cleared off my driveway the night before. 

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dowling gram

Hammer   I have fallen a couple of times in winter and usually ended up on my back. What I do is try to relax my muscles, roll over and get my knees under me and look for something where I can use my arms to help me up. That's usually the stairs or my car.

 

The reason most elderly can't get up is because they try to do it with muscle power alone and they do it with tensed muscles. After my hip replacement I watched younger people get out of a chair. They don't do it with just muscle power. They raise their feet slightly off the floor and use the momentum of the movement of lowering them to stand. I was trying to use just the muscle power of my legs to stand--much more difficult. The elderly are afraid of falling so they don't do that. I tried it while holding on to one chair arm and found it so much easier so that's the way I stand up now and it's second nature since I've practiced it.

 

There is a way around everything. You just have to think outside the box and observe.

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meyery2k
2 hours ago, dowling gram said:

There is a way around everything. You just have to think outside the box and observe.

 

Couldn't agree more.  If I am told something won't work, my reply is always try.  While sometimes I fail to accomplish things, it is never because I didn't try.

 

Fail to try and you have already planned to try to fail...

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meyery2k

I am beginning to accept, hopefully, the trend of no headaches will continue.  2 full days now.  Kala and I went to the mall and shopped.  While I don't particularly enjoy doing that, it was nice to get out and move around.  We started to plan out Thanksgiving.

 

I finally had another sub 100 fasting which reassures me that, finally, I might have beaten what I suspect was a moderate to severe viral infection.  

 

I am now seriously entertaining getting back in the saddle.  Slowly at first but, I feel pretty good.  We had a family discussion and I will have flight plans, check in once every hour or so, have an emergency contact bracelet, and a helmet with crash detection.

 

If the helmet encounters force that is associated with a possible crash, it goes into countdown mode.  If I don't cancel the countdown then a text or email is sent to emergency contacts with the last known GPS coordinates.  It depends on the smart phone for GPS and connection capability.  If there is no service in the area, the app allows for this by letting you set an estimated ride time for the entire ride or a segment.  If you don't check in with the app, a message is sent with last known coordinates.  If I give permission, Kala and Tim can log into the app and see where I am at.

 

While I don't particularly like the idea, I recognize the wisdom of it and additionally would concede it is probably something I should have been doing all along since cycling is a risky activity even on the best of days.  I am somewhat leaning towards the "I won't have any problems" because I believe there was a cause and effect from illness.

 

I think I am beginning to better tolerate the Keppra.  At first I would have foggy periods but they have lessened in both duration and intensity.  Again, illness may have played a role as well.  So I am at the point where I would call this the "end of the beginning" of this new trail.

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Kit

@meyery2k  Oh that is a cool function with the helmet and apps that allow warnings to be sent out.  I can see how that would be useful.

 

It also looks like you are approaching all of this with a great positive attitude.  I know you will be doing well.  :)

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Hammer
22 hours ago, dowling gram said:

Hammer   I have fallen a couple of times in winter and usually ended up on my back. What I do is try to relax my muscles, roll over and get my knees under me and look for something where I can use my arms to help me up. That's usually the stairs or my car.

 

The reason most elderly can't get up is because they try to do it with muscle power alone and they do it with tensed muscles. After my hip replacement I watched younger people get out of a chair. They don't do it with just muscle power. They raise their feet slightly off the floor and use the momentum of the movement of lowering them to stand. I was trying to use just the muscle power of my legs to stand--much more difficult. The elderly are afraid of falling so they don't do that. I tried it while holding on to one chair arm and found it so much easier so that's the way I stand up now and it's second nature since I've practiced it.

 

There is a way around everything. You just have to think outside the box and observe.

Dowling, when I am working on my tractor, I try to do what you mentioned, but, there is little to grab onto to help me get up.  If I don't have a secure handhold, I can't get up.  I realized that, when I was trying to get up, that I really needed my upper body strength to do that, and if I tried to use my upper body strength to get up, it usually worked out okay, but doing that, drained my strength.  I think that I need to workout my upper body, which I did many years ago, but now, with my arthritis and bad back, it's impossible for me to do that.

 

When I was younger, I had plenty of strength and stamina, but as I got older, I lost a lot of both of them.  I tried to maintain my strength and stamina, but my body wouldn't let me, so I ended up where I am now....weak and feeble, which really bothers me.  I knew that getting old would limit what I could do, but I never thought that it would limit me so much that I'd have a hard time functioning....and I'm only 66 years old.  I can't imagine how weak and feeble I'll be in ten years....if I live that long.

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janice21475
2 hours ago, Hammer said:

". . . I need to workout my upper body, which I did many years ago, but now, with my arthritis and bad back, it's impossible for me to do that."

Hi Hammer,

Sorry to read you are experiencing some of the joy of 'elderhood.' For exercise with reduced body stress you could look into swimming. I imagine you would excel at swimming and not suffer the pains of a 'dry' workout. Hope you can work out a plan soon. Keep us posted, maybe it will encourage someone else.

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meyery2k

@dowling gram - I was simply fascinated with your observation of getting out of a chair.  You are absolutely right.  When I want to get out of the chair, I raise then plant my feet which imparts a sort of momentum which then lifts me out of the chair.  Balance then takes over.  I realized it it difficult to get out of my daughter's couch because it is designed to not let you really do the foot plant like a chair.

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adiantum

Hammer, Janice is right in recommending swimming but I hope you find a heated pool.

I hate falling down as Ive had both knees fractured & it hurts bad to kneel on them.

I use  a walking stick to prevent falls from tripping in the garden if I go out at night.

 

That stick also gets used after a days work in the garden.

My posture isnt good after such chores & the stick prevents me from stooping.

 

It was a great  find from the park.

I often wonder how it became abandoned, was there a miracle & the person could walk again?

I use the hook to pull branches within reaching  .

I use it to retrieve the dogs toys from under furniture & best of all is turning it upside down as if  a golf club.

 

 

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Hammer
8 hours ago, janice21475 said:

Hi Hammer,

Sorry to read you are experiencing some of the joy of 'elderhood.' For exercise with reduced body stress you could look into swimming. I imagine you would excel at swimming and not suffer the pains of a 'dry' workout. Hope you can work out a plan soon. Keep us posted, maybe it will encourage someone else.

Thanks for the suggestion Janice, but swimming wouldn't work for me.  I have arthritis in both shoulders, both elbows and my feet, as well as a herniated disk in my lower back.  Just raising my arms above my head gives me pain in my elbows and shoulders.  Also, where I live, there is no place to go swimming.  They built a huge YMCA near me, and instead of including an indoor pool, they opted to put in an indoor track.

 

I have tried numerous times to work out with free weights, as well as Nautilus type of equipment, but each time I try to workout, my arthritis won't let me.  The only exercise that I can do, is to pedal my stationary bike every day for 60 minutes, but that doesn't do anything for my upper body strength.  At least the stationary bike helps my cardiovascular system.

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adiantum

snap!!

I also get pain if I lift my arms above my head, & sometimes they wont lift at all.

A doctor years ago thought it to be a pinched nerve in my neck. I didnt believe him at the time but perhaps he was right after all.

I also have arthritis in my shoulders but its just mild.

I can still swim breast stroke, although thats not suitable in the surf.

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adiantum

Visiting the park daily theres a few regulars that I watch with interest but wonder who is watching the watcher & what advice would they give me.

 

If I'm there late I get to see a chubby man resting himself & his bike on the seats..while he has  a cigarette.

At least he is active.

I try to avoid him as passive smoking eventually has me wanting to smoke again after over 20 years.

 

Another man I watch but  with absolute admiration. Ive posted  his pic here before with him standing on his inflatable paddle board  while fishing & / or paddling. Yesterday I got there as he was coming into shore & got to tell him that he was my hero.

He said he leaves home at 5am to go for a paddle & fish before he goes to work.

Not even his feet get wet & what a lovely start to ones day.

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adiantum

Today is world diabetes day and already theyve pinned the 'shame on you ' badge on me for having type 2.

The model they  used certainly seemed to snarl when she said type2 is a diet and lifestyle condition.

Admittedly she did recommend regular checkups .

 

https://worlddiabetesday.org/about/2019-theme/

 

 

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dowling gram

Hammer do you take anything for your Arthritis besides pain pills? Years ago I was diagnosed with Arthritis in my right knee. I started taking Condrotin and Glucosamine--it's a combination pill. You can buy it in the vitamin aisle of your pharmacy. After 6 months I had no pain at all and so far I have avoided Arthritis and I've continued to take it all these years. Sometimes I take just glucosamine alone but always take the combination pills a few times a year.

 

Condroitin helps build new cartilage and glucosamine plumps up what cartilage is there. It does not work overnight. It takes a few months for you to feel the effect

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