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Katrinka85

BS numbers during pregnancy (type 1 diabetes)

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Katrinka85

Hi Everyone.

 

so, I just wanted to ask some of you for some advice and your recommendations.... and stories

 

what were your numbers like during the first trimester? did you have a lot of highs? was your pregnancy good? healthy outcome?

I seem to struggle still with the spikes after meals... I got my first pump 2 days ago and met with my dietician yesterda who told me that I should try to eat 6 times a day, 30 carbs per meal and test 1 hour after each meal... my numbers are still in the range of 180-220...they do go down and after 2 hours they are where they need to be but I am really worried about the spikes...

I am now 7 weeks pregnant and really wanna hear some of other stories out there...

 

how did your numbers affect your pregnancy? did you have hard time keeping them between 80 and 120? how many highs did you have? how bad are the highs?

 

looking forward to hearing from all of you. ;)

thank you and happy Valentine's Day!

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Lady Imp

I spiked pretty bad during the first trimester....and also had a lot of lows. I also had insulin resistance something FIERCE during most of my 3rd trimester Granted, I spent most of the 1st trimester on MDI, once I finally got insurance figured out and back on the pump, I was able to tweak to my little heart's content when things started going wonky in the 3rd. I will say this though, getting your pump properly configured is going to be a long and perpetual process, especially with the pregnancy. You're seriously going to feel like you finally get things right and 4 days later your body says "nope! lol!" and you're tweaking settings again. My advice? Get comfortable making adjustments on your own - that is the only way to be successful with a pump, pregnant or no. And stop freaking out. The nice thing about the pump is that changes can be made in a snap.

 

In the end, as long as your A1c stays below 7 you should be perfectly fine. I carried into what most American OB's consider to be the "danger zone" for diabetic pregnancies, and despite the early BG issues and stumbling towards the end with blood pressure problems, still delivered a perfectly healthy baby. Doctors like to freak out patients over what I find to be statistically insignificant reasons, and simply because they fear malpractice lawsuits. Don't let their paranoia keep turn into your paranoia and keep you from enjoying the pregnancy.

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rubidoux

During my first pg, my b/s was under 80 about 95% of the time. For my second it was above 120 95% of the time. Two healthy babies, though!

 

During the first tri of my second was when I had the most trouble. I had numbers above 300 on quite a few occasions, and my problems were mostly in the middle of the night. I ended up just testing several times in the night, so I'd set an alarm for every hour and a half.

 

If your trouble is spiking, I think the answer is going to be eating less carb, unless you're already very low carb. During my first pg, I ate under 30 g per day until my inane peach cravings kicked in, which was at least four months, maybe five. After that I ate more carbs but only peach carbs, lol. Can you tell us what you're eating?

 

Also, I don't know about six times a day? What is the point of that? That might be good advice for a t2, who would be producing some insulin in response each time.... and maybe you are. Do you think you're still honeymooning? I don't know though. For me, and I'm guessing by what you said about post-meal spikes above, that just means spiking six times a day instead of 3 or 4. I suppose the nutritionist imagines you will eat less and have a lower spike, but I think all you have to do is eat a smaller amount of carb as part of a normal sized meal. Also, don't replace the carb w protein (although I would eat as much protein as you're wanting, since your body is working on that baby :) ), but do add fat.

 

ETA: Just saw Lady Imp's post and I agree! It is going to be frustrating to get your pump settings where you want them and then they'll change. Just remember, this is all temporary, and while t1 is a pretty freaking frustrating disease, you'll never have it this hard again! And also, I very much agree that you need to take charge of your pump. Do talk to your docs and definitely ask for help here, but you have to learn how to be a pancreas now. What fun! It will be ok, though, and all with it.

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Lady Imp

 

Also, I don't know about six times a day? What is the point of that? That might be good advice for a t2, who would be producing some insulin in response each time.... and maybe you are. Do you think you're still honeymooning? I don't know though. For me, and I'm guessing by what you said about post-meal spikes above, that just means spiking six times a day instead of 3 or 4. I suppose the nutritionist imagines you will eat less and have a lower spike, but I think all you have to do is eat a smaller amount of carb as part of a normal sized meal. Also, don't replace the carb w protein (although I would eat as much protein as you're wanting, since your body is working on that baby :) ), but do add fat.

 

I actually had WAY better control eating 6 mini-meals a day vs. 3 normal meals a day. Not that I ever eat 3 normal meals a day, I am a bit of a grazer. But what it wound up allowing me to do was be able to get my PPs around the 120 mark and not crash cause I was eating every 3 or so hours. It also kept the morning sickness at bay....sort of. :P Personally, I am less than a fan of LCHF diets during pregnancy, as I get kind of anal about eating well-balanced meals when I'm pregnant, but everyone is different. I adopted a strict portion control diet and it worked very well. It's funny the difference in your BGs when you eat only an actual weighed serving of Doritos versus just sitting in front of the TV with the bag, stuffing your face and guessing at the carb count.

 

P.S. My food scale...I bought one with this last pregnancy, and I seriously can't live without it now. A lot of people don't like them, but I depend on mine like Matthew Stafford depends on Reggie Bush. If you're thinking of getting one, I would recommend spending the extra cash on a nice digital one with a built-in food library. They make life so much easier.

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Katrinka85

Great advice!! i do have one but i haven't used it yet. so I will start using it.

did you also test before and after each of thr 6 meals a day????

 

what is the brand of your scale?

 

thanks!!!

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Lady Imp
Great advice!! i do have one but i haven't used it yet. so I will start using it.

did you also test before and after each of thr 6 meals a day????

 

what is the brand of your scale?

 

thanks!!!

 

I was testing on the order of 15x/day....before meals, after meals, every 2 hours through the night as I struggled with overnight lows, I was testing all the time and I still do. Anyway, my scale is a Perfect Portions, and it's seriously the peanut butter to my jelly.

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Kathryn10

Please try to stop worrying!!! I've had 2 successful pregnancies and perfectly healthy babies. First, my a1c was around 7 when I found out I was pregnant. I remember looking back after I found out I was pregnant at a time that my blood sugar was 400+ (I seriously miscalculated the carbs in one of those corn salad things from the deli). I thought for sure that I had ruined my baby's chances of being healthy. I had also just started on a pump about 2 weeks after I became pregnant and after I figured out my bolus rates it was the best thing I could've done! Throughout the pregnancy I was able to reduce my a1c to about 5.5.

 

With my second pregnancy my starting a1c was 5.0 and stayed between that and 5.3 until delivery. The first trimester in both pregnancies had a lot of low blood sugars. Second trimester was a piece of cake, but the third trimester was difficult because of the insulin resistance. You really have to stay on top of your bgs, basal rates and carb ratios.

 

I've definitely had bgs go into the 300s during both pregnancies due to miscalculations and/or hormones, but as long as you're testing often (I test about 10 times per day) and correct when you see bad numbers, you should be fine. Just do your best. That's all you can do! Plenty of women out there have had perfectly healthy babies. I've had type 1 for 25 years with not-so-great control for the first 20 years and did fine.

 

Good luck with your pregnancy!!! Take it one day at a time and enjoy the experience. It will all be SO worth it in the end.

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