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miketurco

understanding protein?

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miketurco

I've found that keeping an eye on protein, in terms of not having too much, helps control my blood sugar. 

 

As things read, the liver converts protein into sugar. But... does it do this only with complete protein? As I understand, the protein one eats doesn't become protein in the body unless what you eat is a complete protein, or a combination of foods (like rice and beans) with all the necessary enzymes.

 

I ask because I've been wondering about classifying protein on my diet, in terms of measuring, as either being complete or not complete. 

 

I know this sound really anal, but I've been doing a lot of experimentation and am always looking for new things to try.

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Bountyman
I know this sound really anal, but I've been doing a lot of experimentation and am always looking for new things to try.

 

Have you tried not being so anal? ;)

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Forester

I've found that keeping an eye on protein, in terms of not having too much, helps control my blood sugar. 

 

As things read, the liver converts protein into sugar. But... does it do this only with complete protein? As I understand, the protein one eats doesn't become protein in the body unless what you eat is a complete protein, or a combination of foods (like rice and beans) with all the necessary enzymes.

 

I ask because I've been wondering about classifying protein on my diet, in terms of measuring, as either being complete or not complete. 

 

I know this sound really anal, but I've been doing a lot of experimentation and am always looking for new things to try.

Hmm, I'm not sure how to answer your question the way you put it.  Liver does make glucose, but generally not directly from protein.  Rather it converts simple amino acids to glucose, about 90% of the time from 2 in particular: alanine and glutamine.  Both are classified as "non-essential" amino acids.  Your body makes them; you don't need them in your diet.  In other words, you only need "complete protein" for making more protein in your body, not for making glucose... which your liver generally only does when it runs out of glycogen, the storable form of glucose. 

 

In your first sentence about protein intake affecting glucose, that may be true if you have been trying to follow a low carb diet.  That is why some refer specifically to the LCHF diet, (Low Carb High Fat), meaning low carb, moderate protein, relatively high fat diet.  In the absence of carbs, protein (actually amino acids broken down from protein), is the next choice for energy, so you really only want to take in enough for protein maintenance, with no excess.  That is when fat can get "burned" instead of protein, leading to the kind of weight loss you are after.  That's the theory anyway, but it worked for me.

 

Hope this helps...

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miketurco

Hmm, I'm not sure how to answer your question the way you put it.  Liver does make glucose, but generally not directly from protein.  Rather it converts simple amino acids to glucose, about 90% of the time from 2 in particular: alanine and glutamine.  Both are classified as "non-essential" amino acids.  Your body makes them; you don't need them in your diet.  In other words, you only need "complete protein" for making more protein in your body, not for making glucose... which your liver generally only does when it runs out of glycogen, the storable form of glucose. 

 

In your first sentence about protein intake affecting glucose, that may be true if you have been trying to follow a low carb diet.  That is why some refer specifically to the LCHF diet, (Low Carb High Fat), meaning low carb, moderate protein, relatively high fat diet.  In the absence of carbs, protein (actually amino acids broken down from protein), is the next choice for energy, so you really only want to take in enough for protein maintenance, with no excess.  That is when fat can get "burned" instead of protein, leading to the kind of weight loss you are after.  That's the theory anyway, but it worked for me.

 

Hope this helps...

 

I thought protein was a go-to source for sugar, once one's running low on glycogen. 

 

Through experimentation, I've lowered my protein intake and increased fat and it's really helped my bg. To tell the truth, though, I had a -lot- of protein in my diet and probably not enough fat. (Carbs have stayed the same.) It could be anything affecting my bg, though. There are a lot of factors to consider.

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Fraser

Funny you ask that, right now I am munching on a slice of sprouted wheat bread with soy nut butter because I had a busy day did not eat enough and when I should have It will get me through the night. I was taught to count 50% of the protein as a longer lasting carb that picks up after the initial carb spike to even things out. My first appointment with the dietician after looking at my logs she said so where are your carbs? You need carbs to live and there is no protein in your logs. Yes I eat carbs 35 to 50 each meal plus 19 gm protein each meal 10 gm carbs plus 10 gm protein as a snack. It has worked out quite well. Oh yes and her next question was what food do I like to eat? I liked her style. Me at dx A1c 12' five years later 6 no meds, eat right and exercise. My motto is to eat better, eat less and exercise more.it at least has worked for me.

 

Being anal works for me too!

 

Update just let you know after late evening snack of sprouted bread and soy nut butter. ( I typically do not eat after dinner). Next mornings reading 102 which just a bit higher than my usual of 90-95. If I would not have eaten at that time would have had a mid sleep 70 or so. Point there are no plans that fit everyone. Just understand what you are eating and listen to your body. New A1c today another 6.0. No meds

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