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miketurco

How to layout a healthy diet?

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miketurco

I've been looking high and low for a way to scientifically/mathematically create a "balanced" diet for myself. My tolerance for carbs is -really- low, like 15g a day max.

 

I came across https://www.insidetracker.com/ and they have an interesting approach. They do blood work and recommend a food plan based on that. As cool as that sounds, I question their ability to do so. I'm thinking there's a lot more to it. For example, I can just imagine paying $100 or more to enroll in their program, plus the cost of the labs, and having them shoot me back a diet plan with 50 or 100 carbs in it. That would be a real waste of money.

 

There are tons of articles on the Internet, of course, written by people who tell you what you should and shouldn't eat. On the on side we have people like Dr. Eades (protein power), and on the other we have groups like PETA who say vegan-ism is the best way to go. On top of that pile is the USDA and the FDA, who, of course, are totally controlled by money from the grain industry. 

 

Sooooo.... those are my thoughts. I'd like to eat healthy and I'm looking for resources.

 

I've been thinking about hiring a dietitian to help me out with this.

 

Anyhow, just sharing some thoughts and hoping to spark some discussion on the matter.

 

Mike 

 

 

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Lady Imp

Honestly, I think the best way is to do your own experiments. Try a food, see how you respond to it and build your diet up around the data. That's how most of us do it. We can troll the internet looking for the "miracle diet," the cookie-cutter fix for good BGs, but the fact of the matter is diet is not a one-size-fits-all kind of thing. We're all in a lifelong experiment - and the data will change regularly. One food that you can handle today might give you problems a year down the road. That's why it's so important to test your BG frequently (even if insurance companies say otherwise!)

 

Good luck, and I hope you can find the diet that best suits your needs. :)

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miketurco

Thanks! I'm actually doing pretty good with food experimentation vs. bg. I was thinking along the lines of getting enough vitamin this and vitamin that in my diet. I've figured out that, if I want to lose weight, I have to (a) eat nothing close to the amount of food I was eating before, and (B) severely limit my carbs. That makes it hard, for me, to balance my diet. In the end, I think "eat a variety of foods" and "eat differently colored fruits and vegetables" is about the best I'll be able to do. Might be a good idea for me to take supplements too.

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Caravaggio

My general thinking on food is more real food (fish, meat, veggies and fruits, for example) and food with minimal but quality processing (oil, butter, cheese, prosciutto, nuts, wine, alcohol for example). Avoid junk food and other commercial processed food. Actually come to think of it, many of my eating principles probably resemble Michael Pollan's, which are more like simple guidelines rather than a "diet" in the sense of some regimented eating plan.

 

For us type 2 diabetes, we of course have to take our carb issues into account. So, for instance, I have to be careful of how much of which fruit I eat, and when I eat fruits.

 

One thing I've stopped doing is "going on a diet." When I stopped dieting and started focusing on good food, that's when I started losing weight. I read books on nutrition and various diets but never settled for any single diet. Rather I picked up what sounded logical to me and what I can incorporate in my life and practice on a daily basis - I still do this.

 

Other things I keep in mind: Stop eating when I'm sort of full (80-90% full), not very full or bloated. Enjoy my food. Prepare my food. Use fresh ingredients or as close to fresh as possible. When dining out, go to places that serve fresh food. Take my time to enjoy what I'm eating and enjoy the company of the people I'm dining with.

 

Keep searching with an open mind, and you'll find what will work for you.

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Lady Imp

Wow, you put way more effort into this than I do lol. My primary concern is BGs. I really don't worry too much about vitamins, there's plenty in veggies. I have found to have symptoms of vitamin E deficiency (not surprising, since the primary source of it is whole grains), so I take a vitamin E supplement as well as vitamin A and D because I'm hanging on to a prayer that it just might give my immune system an extra boost. If anything, vitamin D helps absorb calcium, and I need all the absorption of it I can get given that I don't consume a lot of it lol.

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samuraiguy

I have found to have symptoms of vitamin E deficiency (not surprising, since the primary source of it is whole grains), so I take a vitamin E supplement 

Leafy greens and nuts are my vitamin E go to foods, avocados and fish are low carb options too.

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jwags

I find it is not the total carbs a day but the type of carbs and the amount per meal or snack. There are certain csrbs I can eat that actually lower my bgs. I doubt any dietician or program will give you a truely LC diet. Dr Bernstein's diet is a hood place to start and you can add or subtract carbs.

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Kit

One thing I've stopped doing is "going on a diet." When I stopped dieting and started focusing on good food, that's when I started losing weight. I read books on nutrition and various diets but never settled for any single diet. Rather I picked up what sounded logical to me and what I can incorporate in my life and practice on a daily basis - I still do this.

 

Other things I keep in mind: Stop eating when I'm sort of full (80-90% full), not very full or bloated. Enjoy my food. Prepare my food. Use fresh ingredients or as close to fresh as possible. When dining out, go to places that serve fresh food. Take my time to enjoy what I'm eating and enjoy the company of the people I'm dining with.

 

Keep searching with an open mind, and you'll find what will work for you.

 

That last bit is so true.  Eat healthy food prepared in a manner that tastes good.  Take your time to eat and enjoy yourself.

 

It is so common now days for people to choose quantity and speed over quality.  They prefer a large amount of what is basically nutritional crap that really doesn't taste good over a reasonable amount of something that is good for you and tastes good, but takes a little more effort to prepare.

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miketurco

 

>> Other things I keep in mind: Stop eating when I'm sort of full (80-90% full), not very full or bloated. Enjoy my food.

>> Prepare my food. Use fresh ingredients or as close to fresh as possible. When dining out, go to places that serve

>> fresh food. Take my time to enjoy what I'm eating and enjoy the company of the people I'm dining with.

 

Oh Sweet Lord, spare me the madness!

 

Seriously, though, I could not deal with that. I think it's a personality thing, possibly a learning defect of some sort. If I don't write down and analyze every gram of every food that I eat I consider the day a loss. Basically the same thing goes for managing money. For what it's worth I used to teach stats. I've been turning everything to do with diabetes/health into experiments and studies.

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miketurco

That last bit is so true.  Eat healthy food prepared in a manner that tastes good.  Take your time to eat and enjoy yourself.

 

It is so common now days for people to choose quantity and speed over quality.  They prefer a large amount of what is basically nutritional crap that really doesn't taste good over a reasonable amount of something that is good for you and tastes good, but takes a little more effort to prepare.

 

I think there may be no answer to the question I asked. And you're right. Eat a variety of good foods and that's that. 

 

One thing I've been stressing over a little, though, is protein. To lose weight I stopped eating red meat, cut back on calories and cut back on protein (which drives my bg to heck). Sometimes, now, it's hard to get enough.

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oblivious

If we are basing this on learning how to eat healthy from a beginners point of view, I would use the KISS protocol. Keep It Simple Stupid.

 

Eat home made food without prossesed ingridients, consisting of organic meats, vegetables and a low glycemic carb source like quinoa

 

The fats from organic meats have a better ratio of omega 3 and omega 9 fatty acids, and ofcourse they contain less toxins since it`s organic. Protein is also essential for maintaining or building a strong body.

Vegetables to get all the minerals and vitaims you need, as a diabetic this is more pertinent then for other non diabetic individuals, quick tip, onion, garlic and yellow crooked neck squash help BG regulation.

We need carbs even though we are diabetics, how much is very individual, so find your range and base it on low glycemic sources.

 

If you can make everything from scratch and keep sugar and wheat out of the meals, you are off to a good start!

 

If you need a more advanced approach, research glycemic index tables for carbs you can eat, research protein synthesis to find out how much protein your body needs and when it comes to fat, I think as long as you keep away from transfats you will be ok, but do some research on omega 3, 6 and 9 fatty acids aswell :)

You can never get enough vegetables, so just eat them.

 

Things work so diferent with people, so the best way to get a good plan is to try some diferent meals and track you readings, document it all and then you will find your own guideline wich works for you.

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JanetP

I looked at their "Ultimate Plan" and the tests are nothing more than what a good internist would do during a yearly check-up and the "biomarkers" term is a bunch of hooey!  I think it is a scam and a way to sell supplements.

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Seagal

Best wishes on your search Mike, but be aware there will not be a "professional" that would recommend a limit of 15g carbs per day (at least I would be surprised if you found one).  I don't say it isn't going to give you good b.g., just that when dieticians are telling us to eat 30-50g per meal....well, you see the continuing problem as you have done so much research.

 

Could be you are over-thinking this?  I realize you are a "stat" guy and want to analyze each & every bite, you can and have been and seem to be doing well.  Fine tuning what you have been doing is all you need, not a program that will tell you what you need.

 

Read the comments posted here carefully, they reveal tested and true experiences.

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Deborah233

Eating healthily is eating locally, organically, and ethically so that everything that goes into the body is natural.


A healthy diet is a whole foods diet. A whole foods diet consists of locally fresh fruits and vegetables, raw and unprocessed nuts and seeds, grass fed and pasture raised meat dairy and eggs, unprocessed grains, fresh legumes, herbs and spices, insects, lentils.

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miketurco

I think that sounds nice but threes a lot more to it than that. I thank you for your reply but feel the evidence isn't there to support it. Half a cup of lentils has three days worth of carbs for me. And grains? I'm sorry, what you suggest would shorten my life significantly. However, I do respect your philosophy and try to eat based on the underlying thought.

 

Eating healthily is eating locally, organically, and ethically so that everything that goes into the body is natural.

 

 

A healthy diet is a whole foods diet. A whole foods diet consists of locally fresh fruits and vegetables, raw and unprocessed nuts and seeds, grass fed and pasture raised meat dairy and eggs, unprocessed grains, fresh legumes, herbs and spices, insects, lentils.

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Seagal

Mike have you ever visited "Mark's Daily Apple" site?  You might enjoy reading around it if you haven't already.  I think you also mentioned Peter Attia (Hyperlipid site), he is another one and very much a numbers type of fella.

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