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miketurco

Nurturing T2 diabetes instead of fighting it

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miketurco

Had a thought today re. T2 and the fight against it. In some ways, maybe it's a good thing, or at least a natural thing that should be nurtured instead of fought against.

 

It could be a perfectly natural "alternate" metabolism, belonging mainly to those who's ancestry ate a lot of meat. When these people get too much sugar in their diet, even under the guise of "healthy carbs," T2 D sets in and the body fights back. (Or suffers, whichever the case may be.)

 

I asked myself this question: If the T2 phenomenon were looked at by the medical community as being an alternate metabolism instead of a disease; AND it were identified very early in life, what we call the disease of T2 could be nearly whipped off the face of the planet via dietary means.

 

"The day is near at hand when the doctor will no longer be engaged to patch up the sick man, but to prevent him from getting sick. He will visit families, examine the premises, inspect factories and shops, and give instruction to his patients how to keep from getting sick. Each family will select its doctor and pay him so much a year per capita. The doctors will not lose by the arrangement, either." -- Edison

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NoraWI

If T2 is *an alternative metabolism" of those whose ancestors ate meat, then how do you account for the outlandish numbers of Native Americans, North, Central and South, whose original diet included a LOT of corn and other grains succumbing to T2 when they change to the "modern" diet, especially the "American" diet? There may be other factors as well since the incidence of T2 is also high in the Pacific Islanders and Australasians whose main diet was root, vegetables and seafood and access to meat was so infrequent that before the European invasion they traditionally waged wars against each other to gain captives to fill their need for meat. I think there are other factors at work here, not excluding food additives, highly processed grains (as in flour), concentrated sugars (today including HFCS), and intense exposure to environmental toxins.

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samuraiguy

I sort of self experimenting with that now by trying out the Diabetes (Updated to Metabolism) Miracle Diet by Diane Kress. She is of the mind that their is a majority of people that fall into a category called Metabolism B who have a disconnect between the liver and pancreas in dealing with glucose and lack of it. I am trying to see if it will help extend my time off of medication and keep my A1C's under 6 for longer (but I will try to look at meds if I can't stay under 5.7 despite my LPN's objections, lol).  The only thing that may present some people with challenges with the diet is if you leave phase 1 (basically ketogenic) you must consume at least 11g net carbs every five hours to keep the liver from overreacting and thus making the pancreas overreact. She does also require at least 150 minutes exercise a week to get the optimal results.

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samuraiguy

If T2 is *an alternative metabolism" of those whose ancestors ate meat, then how do you account for the outlandish numbers of Native Americans, North, Central and South, whose original diet included a LOT of corn and other grains succumbing to T2 when they change to the "modern" diet, especially the "American" diet? There may be other factors as well since the incidence of T2 is also high in the Pacific Islanders and Australasians whose main diet was root, vegetables and seafood and access to meat was so infrequent that before the European invasion they traditionally waged wars against each other to gain captives to fill their need for meat. I think there are other factors at work here, not excluding food additives, highly processed grains (as in flour), concentrated sugars (today including HFCS), and intense exposure to environmental toxins.

Also primal cultures and those that eat mostly meat still get plenty of glucagon and vitamins because they eat the fat and organs mostly fresh and raw, i.e. Inuit people eat raw seal fat, liver and kidneys. It's when that stuff is cooked that it creates carcinogens and loses much of its nutrients and is why most people in our modern society would never eat a true "paleo" diet.

 

There is also an activity component that is missed in our culture. Hunting gathering societies cover an average of 2-3 miles a day worth of activity. While the average modern man covers less than half a mile, some less than 500 feet total distance covered a day. This means paleo people could--and did--eat plenty of fruits, root vegetables and other natural starches without as much of an impact to their weight.

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ColaJim

Sarcasm

From my hillbilly point of view:
I agree, type 2 diabetes is a perfectly natural "alternate" metabolism.
The way I see it: Due to the loss of some nutrients in our "instant" foods, our bodies failed to process and utilize food properly resulting in the desensitizing of some switches, just one set of which is the "wake up" switches that switch ones ISF (correction factor) from about 10 mg/dL to about 40 mg/dL per unit insulin when we wake up. So now we are permanently asleep from an insulin POV.
And some t2 diabetics now even require the use of constant medication in order to maintain an insulin sensitivity of 10 mg/dL per unit insulin so that injected insulin will be useful.

Very natural.

I know, I know, many people don't even believe that the human body has any "wake up" switches.
 

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miketurco

Sarcasm

 

From my hillbilly point of view:

I agree, type 2 diabetes is a perfectly natural "alternate" metabolism.

The way I see it: Due to the loss of some nutrients in our "instant" foods, our bodies failed to process and utilize food properly resulting in the desensitizing of some switches, just one set of which is the "wake up" switches that switch ones ISF (correction factor) from about 10 mg/dL to about 40 mg/dL per unit insulin when we wake up. So now we are permanently asleep from an insulin POV.

And some t2 diabetics now even require the use of constant medication in order to maintain an insulin sensitivity of 10 mg/dL per unit insulin so that injected insulin will be useful.

 

Very natural.

 

I know, I know, many people don't even believe that the human body has any "wake up" switches.

 

 

I agree totally that what you're saying is a distinct possibility. My personal feeling is that, in general, our level of scientific achievement as a society is very limited. We only know and understand a very small piece of the great reality in which we live. The human condition, I think, is that every generation of society considers itself to have reached the ultimate levels of music, art, science, etc. Personally, I call BS on that. We still fight wars, we just have "better" weapons. We've been to the moon -- big yip! One day, in the far far distant future, if we make it to that point, the bridges between science, art and philosophy will cross, we will live in a world that is truly free, and that will be mankind's first step towards what we now call progress.
 
So, sure, nutrients lost from food, gmo, global worming, yada yada. What we call "science" is a joke. Occam's razor is one of the best and one of the few real tools we have in regards to understanding the world. And what you said makes perfect sense. 

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