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nojob

Hi Everyone, 10 year old with type 1

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nojob

Its very frustrating!

 

I started thinking the other day. Will he continue like this for the rest

of his life?

 

Has anyone ever been cured of diabetes?

There must be a cure some how. Will it be possible in our life time?

 

Thanks

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Lloyd

Diabetics have been told a cure is 5 years away. They have been told this for more than 50 years.

 

That does not mean there won't be a cure, but predicting when is very iffy.

 

-Lloyd

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rubidoux

I'm sorry! I think it is so hard for the parents. I would much rather it be me than my child.

 

I'm not sure how things are going for you guys, or how long you've been dealing w it, but I don't think things will stay as they are now. Someday diabetes will just be a normal not too big part of his life. I have a ten year old, too, and I imagine it's a hard time to be diabetic.

 

I don't know what I think of a cure in our lifetimes. I'm hoping for new gadgets and meds that will make things easier and less scary.

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DeusXM

The most important thing to remember is that the fact your son has diabetes won't stop them doing whatever he wants in life, or from having a long and happy life.

 

I don't want this to sound like a boast, but let me just put forward myself as an example.

 

I was diagnosed at the age of 14 - granted, a bit older than your son. But in the 16 years since I was diagnosed, I have:

 

  • Successfully passed all the various exams and things I had to do at school
  • Flown gliders, fired rifles, been on cadet camps
  • Went to university, lived like any other student and came back with a degree and a bit of experience in looking after myself
  • Had a full and varied social life
  • Backpacked around Eastern Europe with friends, having to work my way across a part of the world where I don't speak the language, accommodation hasn't been booked in advance and every morning when I woke up I had no idea which city or even which country I might find myself in at the end of the day
  • Moved abroad to the Middle East for a couple of years
  • Climbed mountains in Thailand and stayed with hill tribes
  • Watched the sun rise at Uluru
  • Dive the Great Barrier Reef
  • Do a skydive
  • Fallen in love

...and I intend to be here for much much longer.

 

The point I'm making is that while the diagnosis might come as a complete shock, your son is still the same person they were the day before his diagnosis. He can go on and do whatever he wants in life in the same way that anyone can do what they want in their life - by applying themselves, working hard, planning, preparing and fighting for what they want. Diabetes is just another thing to deal with. Life doesn't stop. Life is what you make of it and there is absolutely no time when "Diabetes won't let me do it" is a valid excuse for anything. Diabetes does not have to slow you down. It didn't stop me. Why should it stop your son?

 

Don't get me wrong. We all want a cure. We all would rather not have diabetes. But the most important thing you can do is ensure your son has the preparation they need for the life he wants, regardless of whether or not he has diabetes.

 

Don't put lives on hold waiting for a cure. It's coming, but until then, make sure that your child truly lives every day.

 

What matters is not whether diabetes will continue to be there for the rest of his life. What matters is what he does with the rest of his life - and that's entirely down to the choices you and he make, not the condition he has.

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nojob

A 10 year old with the moniker of "no job".  Makes a person wonder. 

Hey control. nojob is a nickname I have used for a long time. So there is nothing to it. So stop wondering.

 

I have used it to encourage myself.

 

My boy 10 years old has type 1 diabetes, he has fainted twice in the last 12 months. So it is very frustrating when as a parent 

you cannot do anything about it. 

 

You did not address my question. Do you think in our lifetime there will be a cure for diabetes. Because all I have heard is

how to manage it. My boy can inject himself now, he has the pump. But how can he live like this?

 

I am encouraged by DeusXM and others. 

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Dustin B

You did not address my question. Do you think in our lifetime there will be a cure for diabetes. Because all I have heard is

how to manage it. My boy can inject himself now, he has the pump. But how can he live like this?

 

 

There are 10's of thousands of us "that live like this everyday". To be brutally honest he will learn to live with it. He will figure out what works for him and he will adapt to the lifestyle that has been forced upon him. It won't be easy, and there will be times when taking care of himself is the last thing on his mind. He will undoubtedly have rough patches along the way as he learns that taking care of himself has to be a top priority. I was 14 at diagnosis and have lived through this myself.

 

As far as a cure, who truly knows? The science sounds convincing, and I personally would like to think that something better is just around the corner. Again, who knows. As others have said you will be much more successful learning to manage being a diabetic than waiting on a cure.

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Bountyman
Do you think in our lifetime there will be a cure for diabetes.

 

No one here would know that. There's really no information from those that are seeking a cure as well, because that information, for business reasons, is always kept under wraps. When, and if a cure is found...the whole world will know about it the same day.

 

There was a time when all Type 1 diabetics died within days or weeks. Nowadays, Type 1 diabetics can live a long, active life where management can be or won't let be a bother. In that perspective...the word "cure" can be semantic. It's a matter of outlook.

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rubidoux

One thing to think about is keeping one's body in the best condition possible in case there is a cure or partial treatment that might be reserved, at least at first, for people in better shape.

 

One of my main motivations for losing weight was that I think I'd be more likely to get better treatment by docs/hospitals if I'm perceived as being "compliant". One example of this sort of thing is the BMI requirements for kidney transplant.

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Stl-T2

There are some reasons to hope for a cure.  Scientists are getting better and better at manipulating cells to make them pluripotent, meaning making them capable of turning into different types of cells.  This is important because it means that patient's own cells might be coaxed into turning into beta cells.  Just in the last year or two there have been some preliminary experiments done with what is being called tissue printing.  It's sort of like 3D printing done with cells instead of plastic.  I've also heard that someone is researching a hormone that stimulates beta cell proliferation during pregnancy and trying to develop that into a method of treating at least type 2.  There are some very thorny technical issues to deal with and a lot of serious safety issues and I'd be quite surprised if anyone gets it all put together in the next 15 years, but I might be willing to bet on it being sometime in your son's lifetime.   In the meantime, follow the advice above.

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control

i assume the person is a currently unemployed parent of a 10 yr old

 

Ah.  So I see. 

 

Note to self:  Do not post so early in the morning and with 5 minutes to get out the door for work.

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Caravaggio

Its very frustrating!

 

I started thinking the other day. Will he continue like this for the rest

of his life?

 

Has anyone ever been cured of diabetes?

There must be a cure some how. Will it be possible in our life time?

 

Thanks

 

If you do a search on athletes, artists, statesmen and many other successful people in various fields, you will find a lot of people with Type 1 diabetes. I can't speak for Type 1 diabetics since I'm not one, but I personally am inspired by those who have not only lived with this condition but have thrived as well.

 

I follow a number of Type 1 bloggers, many of whom started blogging in their late teens or early 20s. They share a lot of their frustrations, experiences, achievements, many sad and funny moments, as a Type 1 diabetic. I suggest reading their blogs. A number of parents of Type 1 diabetics also blog. I also recommend reading some of the parents' blogs.

 

 

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DeusXM

 

 

 

My boy can inject himself now, he has the pump. But how can he live like this?

 

I don't want to demean the challenges we face every day, but the answer is 'quite easily'. 

 

That was sorta why I posted my boastful list of personal achievements - if having to inject and manage my diabetes was so impossible, do you think I would have managed even a quarter of those things on the list?

 

One thing that I find works well for me is to see diabetes not as one grand all-encompassing challenge, but more a series of little bite-sized individual ones that can be overcome. For instance, your son fainting twice. I can't imagine how terrifying that must be for a parent, but I would be inclined not to see either event as 'diabetes' as a whole, but something individual than went wrong - it's about working out why that happened. 

 

It's worth also being aware that while fainting etc. is something that can be associated with diabetes, it does not mean it will inherently happen or is a regular occurrence. Again, I've never been hospitalised or collapsed as a result of having diabetes for 16 years. So treat these things as accidental one-offs, in the same way that having a bad fall or a nasty cut are things that can happen to people but are the exception, rather than the rule. 

 

 

 

You did not address my question. Do you think in our lifetime there will be a cure for diabetes. Because all I have heard is

how to manage it.

 

All you'll have heard is how to manage it because that's currently all we have. T1 diabetes is a VERY complicated medical condition and we don't even really know what causes it, except that it appears to be a genetic condition. The reason most of us are tiptoing around the cure is because I suspect none of us are genetic biochemists so we don't really have an inside track into feasibility or timescales. Most of us also live full and healthy lives without a cure. As I said, all of us want a cure but I think many of us are doing just fine with good management.

 

As for cures on the horizon, there are a lot of promising leads for research and it's fair to say that in the last 10 years we've made more progress than in the last 100. Will there be a cure in my lifetime? I don't know. I think it's possible. I hope it's probable. But I'm not going to put my life on hold or just give up while I wait. I'm going to look after myself so that I'm in great condition when the cure does come, and I'm going to enjoy my life in the meantime.

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Stl-T2
pat593

Don't worry about a cure, if it happens, great.  Focus only on management and knowing that it is not a big deal.  I had a son who was born with cerebral palsy - constant seizures, bare minimum brain function and no quality of life. 

 

Diabetes?  It is not fatal anymore - wow, that is amazing in itself - and should not stop your son from living his life ANYWAY he chooses. 

 

He actually has a leg up on most kids, he will be taught at an early age how important it is to have a balanced healthy life.  And you are in a wonderful position to get him started right on this journey - just like you taught him to brush his teeth everyday,  teach him that his normal will include monitoring his blood sugar, no big deal unless you make it one. 

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Bountyman

I had a son who was born with cerebral palsy - constant seizures, bare minimum brain function and no quality of life. 

Let me say that was so brave of you to share with people whom you've never met. That must have been quite the challenge and heartbreak. When Mother's Day rolls around again next May...consider yourself hugged.

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ant hill

Don't worry about a cure, if it happens, great.  Focus only on management and knowing that it is not a big deal.  I had a son who was born with cerebral palsy - constant seizures, bare minimum brain function and no quality of life. 

 

Diabetes?  It is not fatal anymore - wow, that is amazing in itself - and should not stop your son from living his life ANYWAY he chooses. 

 

He actually has a leg up on most kids, he will be taught at an early age how important it is to have a balanced healthy life.  And you are in a wonderful position to get him started right on this journey - just like you taught him to brush his teeth everyday,  teach him that his normal will include monitoring his blood sugar, no big deal unless you make it one. 

I suggest to get on with Life as a Cure will not be anywhere within the next 10 or more years. Keep him Mobile with Activity!! and don't keep him in a chair.

 

Welcome to DF.

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