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miketurco

Lantus solostar pen questions

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miketurco

Just getting up to speed and am not clear on the details. Here's what I'm thinking:

 

Let's say I'm headed out for the day (I do a lot of full road trips.) Put the needle on the pen and cap it. Wet and dry the Freo, drop the pen in, then drop that into a fanny pack with the rest of my stuff. Out and about, this and that, then shot time rolls around. From here, slip into a quiet spot somewhere and do the ten second thing through the shirt. Replace the cap. Toss the needle later. Sound like a good plan?

 

 

Thanks,

 

Mike

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Bar&In

I am not sure what you are asking?

 

I just throw mine in my backpack and when it comes time I pull it out and give myself my shot in between cycles at work.

 

I've never shot through my shirt, I just pull my shirt up and inject. And I work in somewhat hot environment and never had a problem keeping pen in my backpack.

 

I usually change my needle every 3 days or so not every day for my Lantus pen since its only a once per day injection.

 

Had times I forgot to take it, had times my pen wouldn't turn because it ran out while at work... just adjust and take smaller dose depending on hours missed.

 

Like I said not sure what you were asking but that's all I do for my Lantus shot, pretty simple and only have to take it once per day.

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Bar&In

LOL, I just stated what I do.

 

Only thing I would advise which I learned the hard way while at work and tried to turn my pen and it wouldn't turn is if you have to take say 10 units I would attempt to turn it 12 or 13 units prior to your day trip to ensure you have 2-3 units test and 10 units dose available while away. That way you know you have enough to cover your daily dose.

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Bountyman

If you do do this, I suggest you leave the inner needle cap on because; once you put that needle into the glass vial changes in ambient temperature will wick insulin from the vial. You'll also run the risk...since there will be temperature changes, of sucking air into the vial.

 

Were it me...I wouldn't screw the needle on until I was ready to inject.

 

By the bye...what size needles are you using?

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Bar&In

Wanted to add to,

 

Always waste 2-3 units testing on your Lantus. Its one thing to shoot air with your fast acting and eat but another for your slow acting. I ended up shooting air in beginning I believe because I didn't test prior to each shot because I didn't want to waste insulin and the result was a very shootty day.

 

Also if you end up having the misfortune of hitting a vein with your slow acting make sure you have your snack ready. I waited while continually monitoring my numbers and when it got to point and I tried putting peanut butter on bread, I struggled mightily just getting it on the bread.  

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miketurco

If you do do this, I suggest you leave the inner needle cap on because; once you put that needle into the glass vial changes in ambient temperature will wick insulin from the vial. You'll also run the risk...since there will be temperature changes, of sucking air into the vial.

 

Were it me...I wouldn't screw the needle on until I was ready to inject.

 

By the bye...what size needles are you using?

 

6mm, 33 gauge, ultra fine. Can barely feel them going in.

 

Yah, might as well use a new needle each time. What you say about wicking makes a lot of sense. Especially here in the desert where the temperatures are up-and-down by forty some degrees each day.

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miketurco

Wanted to add to,

 

Always waste 2-3 units testing on your Lantus. Its one thing to shoot air with your fast acting and eat but another for your slow acting. I ended up shooting air in beginning I believe because I didn't test prior to each shot because I didn't want to waste insulin and the result was a very shootty day.

 

Also if you end up having the misfortune of hitting a vein with your slow acting make sure you have your snack ready. I waited while continually monitoring my numbers and when it got to point and I tried putting peanut butter on bread, I struggled mightily just getting it on the bread.  

 

I was going to ask whether those couple units they recommend you use to test were a waste, glad you mentioned that.

 

I've been through a few lows from glipizide & they scare me. I'm definitely prepared. But peanut butter on bread? Hard candy and glucose pills act a lot more quickly, so I have heard. I hit a low last week and tried eating a piece of cheesecake. It did nothing for me and I had to hit the candy. I've also used skittles in the past, those work well. 

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Bountyman

6mm, 33 gauge, ultra fine. Can barely feel them going in.

 

I used the BD 5mmx31G. Same experience...barely feel them go in. All my injections were abdominal. I had 14 spots tattooed on my stomach and a rotational chart I went by. In other words I used the same injection site only once every two weeks.

 

injection%20numbers2.jpg

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Bountyman

I was going to ask whether those couple units they recommend you use to test were a waste...

 

With a needle as small as 6mmx33G just screwing the needle on will wick the insulin up to the point. Try it. Screw the needle on then before you dial up the unit measure...push on the button at the end...watch the insulin ball up at the point.

 

The "purge" suggested is for the largest needles that are made for pens.

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Bountyman

Bountyman do you really have rotation sites tatooed? 

 

Yes. I figured I'd be on this insulin crap the rest of my life. Send me $20 and your email address and I'll send you a snapshot. :)

 

Edited to add: I had black dots tattooed on...not the numbers. The numbers are for a calender. You write down the numbers on your calender. Monday, number 1. Tuesday, number 2. etc. until you get to 14...then start over again.

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miketurco

Tonight, the needle kind of pushed itself out at the end of the 10 second count and some insulin came with it. I don't know how much and didn't try to inject more to make up for it. I'd guess it was a good three units though. How to prevent/deal with this situation?

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Bountyman

"Subcutaneous" is a thin space between the muscle and the tougher layers of the dermis above it (image below). When Injecting a volume of insulin into the subcutaneous layer of the skin it needs to spread out in order not to "push back". If you miss that soft tissue you'll get push back. If your needle is too long...you'll hit muscle and as well as insulin pushing back you'll get blood as well. If you use a needle that's too short...you'll inject into the dermis level and get push back.

 

You mentioned that you're using a 6mm needle. I suggest you, one, try an 8mm needle and two, inject into an area that has more fat. Depressing the pen plunger slower to give the insulin more time to spread out into the subcutaneous tissue may also help.

 

As to the needle pushing "itself" out...be forceful, maybe grit your teeth and use both hands next time. :)

 

piele.jpg

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mom24grlz

Tonight, the needle kind of pushed itself out at the end of the 10 second count and some insulin came with it. I don't know how much and didn't try to inject more to make up for it. I'd guess it was a good three units though. How to prevent/deal with this situation?

Ashleigh occasionally gets leakback too. I think she counts to 10 like you. She's using 5mm pen tips. Where do you inject lantus? Ashleigh's injecting in her thighs and hips. I've heard counting longer can help, pinching up, not pinching up, rotating needle as you pull out, are all things people have suggested to me to prevent leakback.

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miketurco

I'm going to try the suggestions with the existing needles and go to a longer needle if necessary.

 

Regarding injection site, it goes in my stomach. Plenty of fat there! As to the needle pushing itself out, what I meant was the needle was applying a force such that it would have pushed itself out.

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miketurco

Regarding injection sites, everyone keeps saying "stomach stomach stomach." I'm overweight (understatement) and am wondering whether I'm injecting into fat and not into subcutaneous tissue.

 

So I'm thinking back of the arms and the fatty areas of the thighs. I don't have much fat there. Why does everyone keep saying the stomach is the way to go?

 

Ref for injection sites: http://www.lantus.com/day-by-day/day-two/rotating-injection-sites

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Bountyman

Regarding injection sites, everyone keeps saying "stomach stomach stomach." I'm overweight (understatement) and am wondering whether I'm injecting into fat and not into subcutaneous tissue.

 

Look at my diagram again. The area between the dermis (skin tissue) and the muscle IS the subcutaneous layer. The thickness of that layer depends on the individual. After Lantus is injected it changes its pH level and crystallizes. That crystallization releases the insulin into the subcutaneous (fat layer) of the body over time. Fat is a tissue. Maybe you're thinking that if you inject into fat the insulin has no efficacy. You'd be wrong.

 

 

So I'm thinking back of the arms and the fatty areas of the thighs. I don't have much fat there. Why does everyone keep saying the stomach is the way to go?

 

Sitting in your chair with your hands in your lap...you tell me...what's the easiest spot to inject into from that position? I suggest you inject into all the areas you feel comfortable with and decide for yourself.

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miketurco

Look at my diagram again. The area between the dermis (skin tissue) and the muscle IS the subcutaneous layer. The thickness of that layer depends on the individual. After Lantus is injected it changes its pH level and crystallizes. That crystallization releases the insulin into the subcutaneous (fat layer) of the body over time. Fat is a tissue. Maybe you're thinking that if you inject into fat the insulin has no efficacy. You'd be wrong.

 

 

Sitting in your chair with your hands in your lap...you tell me...what's the easiest spot to inject into from that position? I suggest you inject into all the areas you feel comfortable with and decide for yourself.

 

Got it. Thanks. My understanding is that it's injected sub-c and works its way into the muscles. My doctor said it works like a "poor man's insulin pump." Lantus finds its way into the muscle tissue and is released slowly from there.

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mom24grlz

Regarding injection sites, everyone keeps saying "stomach stomach stomach." I'm overweight (understatement) and am wondering whether I'm injecting into fat and not into subcutaneous tissue.

 

So I'm thinking back of the arms and the fatty areas of the thighs. I don't have much fat there. Why does everyone keep saying the stomach is the way to go?

 

Ref for injection sites: http://www.lantus.com/day-by-day/day-two/rotating-injection-sites

Not sure. Most parents of type 1s are told to avoid the stomach for lantus injections. I think it has something to do with the absorption rate.

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Bountyman

Got it. Thanks. My understanding is that it's injected sub-c and works its way into the muscles. My doctor said it works like a "poor man's insulin pump." Lantus finds its way into the muscle tissue and is released slowly from there.

 

Yeah...um...no. Not the way Lantus works. Lantus, injected into the subcutaneous, is turned from a liquid into a crystalline structure at the injection site. It does that when the body changes its pH structure. The "crystaline" structure then gives off the insulin over time...which is absorbed by the blood vessels in the subcutaneous layer. Your doctor's wingin' it. If morbidly obese people injected Lantus into their abdomen...it would never reach the abdominal muscles.

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Bountyman

Not sure. Most parents of type 1s are told to avoid the stomach for lantus injections. I think it has something to do with the absorption rate.

 

Were you told that as a parent by your doctor...or did you read that somewhere?

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mom24grlz

Were you told that as a parent by your doctor...or did you read that somewhere?

 

Doctor recommendation but also from talking to other parents of type 1 children.  Butt seems to be the most popular recommendation followed by arms.  Ashleigh has always refused to do injections or pump sites in her butt, so the hip is the next closest location. When she did MDI full time she always did the Lantus in her thighs and it seemed to work well for her.

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