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MTano0720

Early diagnosed GDM Need advice

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MTano0720

hello all im almost 10 weeks along and was diagnosed early in this pregnancy (from what i hear) this is the first time ever being consider Diabetic. My numbers are really high, slowly dropping but nowhere near what the Dr wants to see (well in my opinion) first test was 209 mg and that was 2 hours after eating bad carbs, last night after dinner it dropped to 181 1 hour after a low carb dinner, and this AM testing after fasting was at 129, and after breakfast 1 egg, 2 toast - 1 hour 189. my goals are 60-90 fasting test goal and 90-130 1 hour after meals?

 

im scared, emotional, and lost. ive read that its not too bad on baby but the Dr and nurse treat it differently. Stress i know cant help these numbers. please help any ideas to help ease my mind? i have support from  family but being im the first every diagnosed we are still new to this.

Thank you in advance

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samuraiguy

Welcome to the forums and congrats on the pregnancy. Does GDM throw a monkey wrench into your pregnancy? You bet, but the good news is you have the ability to control your numbers and keep them as close to normal as possible, certainly low enough so the risk is minimal to your baby. The AACE (endos) recommends getting your A1C under 6 if possible (to do this you would need a FBG under 100 mg/dl, 1 hour PP under 140 mg/dl and 2 hour PP under 120 mg/dl), under 6.5 as a minimum standard for all parts of pregnancy. Depending on your current A1C this is very doable in short order by just adjusting your diet, exercise and taking any prescribed meds and/or insulin. 

 

I would say the first step is to watch your carb intake and, if possible, spread it out to five smaller meal/snacks rather than three larger meals. Use your meter as a guide as to what carbs to eat and how much (you now know 2 pieces of toast is too much) based on your goals--which are very reasonable and doable--and don't forget PP exercise can often help blunt any spikes too.

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MTano0720

Thank you Samuriguy.. i had a feeling even though my nurse went over the whole meal planning that the bread maybe too much. my A1C was at 7.2 and im hoping to cut it down as best as i can. thank you for your advice

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fjordscape

Congratulations on the pregnancy!

 

GD certainly can cause problems for the fetus and the child. See this summary from the federal government. http://www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/gest_diabetes/Pages/sub2.aspx WebMD and Mayo Clinic are other good online sources of information.

 

The BG targets you listed are just the normal, healthy ranges. I think 140 at hour 1 is normal, but lower is better.

 

Gestational diabetes goes away after delivery. However, people who are very overweight often have numbers in these ranges. If your glucose wasn't tested before pregnancy, this is conceivably not just GD. Someone with your numbers who is not pregnant actually would be high in the defined range of prediabetes.

 

Early diabetes is not reason to feel devastated. Diabetes is a slow-progressing condition even if not held in check, and it is easy for most people to hold it in check. Diabetes is defined solely as blood glucose being consistently beyond a certain level. Once this happens, serious organ damage, in particular to the retinas and kidneys, takes at least 10 years to come to fruition, even under neglect. If someone is diagnosed early, this should not happen because they probably will be under a doctor's care.

 

Any diabetes guide will tell you that the most effective preventative measures for prediabetes and diabetes, and also the standard first treatments, are daily exercise and changes in diet. Unfortunately, there are opposing theories about diet, but since 2000, the high carb, low fat theory has been falling into disrepute and the low carb, high fat theory (LCHF) has been gaining favor. Reducing carbs means eating less sweeteners and less starchy foods. Bad starchy foods include potato, refined wheat products (i.e., white flour), and other refined cereals, e.g., white rice. I don't know what the carb proportions should be for a pregnant woman, but since your BG is quite too high, it can't hurt to substitute brown rice for white rice, whole grain bread for white bread, and drink fewer 20 oz servings of soft drinks. An example of LCHF is the famous Atkins diet.

 

Exercise should include light aerobics and modest strength training (e.g., lift baby over head 10 times, 3 sets twice a day? :D) As little as 30 minutes a day of brisk walking can bring down lower BG and blood pressure. Everybody of all ages should be doing this. The risk factors for diabetes are all the same ones as for cardiovascular disease (CVD), except that elevated glucose (as in prediabetes) is not a risk factor for CVD.

 

Recently on this forum there have been success stories from people whose BG was much higher than yours. They lowered their BG to good levels in 4 to 6 months by a combination of losing weight, daily exercise, and cutting down on carbs.

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jwags

I think they are stricter with GD bgs than with normal diabetics. What range has your doctor given you? It is important to get close to that range . You may need meds or insulin to get there.

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fjordscape

Other refined flour products are pizza and tortillas. I find most pizza doughs digest poorly. I scrape off the toppings and eat them. If I eat Mexican food, I leave aside the taco shells and tortilla wrappers.

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