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miketurco

how much novolog?

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miketurco

Am seriously considering novolog (fast acting) in addition to lantus (slow). I need to pull my morning BG down from mid 130s to under a hundred. I don't think continuing to up my basal is the right way to go.

 

I'm T2.

 

Before I take on another med expenses, I'm wondering how much novolog I might end up using. I can get two flexpens for 25 ea. a month. After that the cost goes up to 80 something each. (Pretty much same as lantus.)

 

I'll be using this to drag myself down from, say, 135 to 90 in the morning. Can anybody take a wild guess as to how many units something like that would require? I realize how different everyone's needs are but am trying to come up with a ballpark figure.

 

Also, how many units in a 3ml pen? I don't know if the pens are u100 or what.

 

Thanks

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princesslinda

I am concerned that if you're taking all this insulin, you'll stop making your own, thus requiring it from here on out.   To know how much to take, you'd have to experiment and find your insulin:carb ration and go from there, adjusting based on how many carbs you're consuming.  My co-worker uses the Novolog flex pen, and each has 250 units. She's very insulin resistant, requiring 15-20 units or so before a meal.  Interestingly, it takes about 90 minutes for it to take effect (which to me doesn't seem all that "quick acting.")

 

Personally, I'd have to be staying at a lot higher reading than 130 to want to add insulin.

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William V

Am seriously considering novolog (fast acting) in addition to lantus (slow). I need to pull my morning BG down from mid 130s to under a hundred. I don't think continuing to up my basal is the right way to go.

 

I'm T2.

 

Before I take on another med expenses, I'm wondering how much novolog I might end up using. I can get two flexpens for 25 ea. a month. After that the cost goes up to 80 something each. (Pretty much same as lantus.)

 

I'll be using this to drag myself down from, say, 135 to 90 in the morning. Can anybody take a wild guess as to how many units something like that would require? I realize how different everyone's needs are but am trying to come up with a ballpark figure.

 

Also, how many units in a 3ml pen? I don't know if the pens are u100 or what.

 

Thanks

First off doctors typically calculate individual's insulin requirements using standard formula to obtain a safe "customer made" starting value for both long acting and rapid acting insulin. Fast (er) acting insulin is dangerous; particularly dosed incorrectly. There are way too many variables to hazard any wild guess that would have meaning. What works for my diet and how i manage my diabetes may be 5 times as much, or less,  than the next person. Have you entertained/tested splitting your long acting insulin for example only: 50% before bed /50% morning? or shifting the dosing time a few hours to better align its highest level of activity in your body to your higher BG times? This type of discussion is best done with your doctor.

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miketurco

Based on what I've read, going north of 125 on a regular basis is bad bad bad. And for what is worth, when I'm in the 130s with a fasting I tend to head north for a few hours. I'm hoping that a morning boost will allow me to reduce my evening background dosage.

 

I've never heard of a case where taking insulin causes ones panc to stop working. Based on my last cpep, before starting insulin, my panc was kicking out way too much insulin and was on its way to burning itself out.

 

I am sternly insulin resistant.

 

I Fear being sickly and dependent and I'm facing a triple threat. diabetes, hypertension and ckd. I will do whatever it takes to bring those numbers down. If, in part, that means taking another shot, I'm all for it.

 

I was just wondering how much Nov people take to get an idea of the cost. I definitely wouldn't do anything like this without talking to a doctor.

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Bar&In

I'm still in HM period so I only take roughly 40-45 units every 3 days when I change my insert (basal and bolus combined). That's also eating between 150-200 carbs daily. Usually about 15 units total daily, 1 unit basal broken up over 5 doses and usually 6 boluses including meals and snacks totaling around 14-15 units daily.

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mom24grlz

HM=Honeymoon period. the period after diagnosis (type 1) where the pancreas is still producing insulin. It can last from a couple days to a couple of years, or some people skip it all together (Ashleigh never had one)

 

As you already know the amount of insulin taken at meal times and to correct high blood sugars can vary from person to person and even from meal to meal.  Here are Ashleigh's amounts for novolog:

 

Breakfast=1 unit insulin for every 6 carbs eaten (1:6)

Lunch=1 unit for every 7 carbs eaten (1:7)

after school snack=1 unit for every 8 carbs eaten (1:8)

supper=1 unit for every 7 carbs eaten (1:7)

evening snack=1 unit for every 8 carbs eaten (1:8)

 

Correction doses=12am-5am she gets 1 unit brings her down 25 points (1:25) we correct for numbers above 130

6AM-7AM=1 unit brings her down 35 points (1:35)*

8am-9pm=1 unit brings her down 40 points (1:40)

10pm-11pm=1 unit brings her down 30 points (1:30)

 

*thinking about changing this to 1:25 because the 35 isn't working to well anymore.

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DeusXM

 

 

I am sternly insulin resistant. 

 

Then adding more insulin is the single worst thing you can do.

 

The more insulin you add, the more insulin resistant you become.

 

All of your health concerns/problems are caused by the fact that your pancreas overproduces insulin. What you need to do is to get your circulating insulin levels down along with your blood sugar. You've already implied that you also have hypertension and are at risk of CVD. Insulin tends to increase blood pressure and excess insulin is correlated with CVD. 

 

You do NOT need more insulin. You need an alternative medication that allows you to use the insulin you produce more effectively and to reduce the overall glycaemic load of your diet. I don't know enough about oral hypoglycaemics to tell you what that drug is (I'm assuming you're already on Met), but pramlintide (Symlin) might be of use based on the fact it encourages your body to use less insulin. Consult your doctor. Also, how much exercise are you doing? The most effective way to treat insulin resistance, pharmacologically or not, is exercise.

 

I cannot stress enough how more insulin is the wrong choice for you.

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GrammaBear

Thank you for that. I'll definitely discuss that with the doctor.

 

Mike, for what it is worth, when I was taking Lantus on MDI (multiple daily injections) the Dr. told me to take it once a day.  The company claims it last 24 hrs however for me it lasted 16 hrs and no more.  So upon talking to an Endocrinologist that I consulted instead of my GP, we agreed that it would be better for me to split the dose into two injections.  I am more insulin sensitive in the a.m., so I injected 8 units in the morning and 10 or 12 units in the evening.  Maybe you could consider talking about that with your doctor ?

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miketurco

well, I take the L shot at 9p, and that happens to be the lowest bg point of the day. The difficulty I have is in the morning, from about 11 to 14 hours after the injection. I did try splitting it but it doesn't really make a difference. I think splitting the injection would make more sense if I were experiencing highs in the evening, but I'm not.

 

I can definitely work harder at getting more exercise and improving my weight loss regimen. And I'm not opposed to doing something, medicinally, to improve my insulin resistance.

 

My thought in going with a morning bolus is that it will allow me to reduce the level of my evening basal shot. The real problem area for me is from wakeup time to around 1pm.

 

I'm not trying to take more insulin. And in a way, taking slow acting at night and rapid in the morning is similar, in concept, to splitting up the lantus dose.

 

Metformin helps a lot, but the absorption rate and the period of time for which is effective just don't cut it for me. in going to give the er a shot, maybe that will work better for me.

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miketurco

Went to the doctor today. Let's just say that the words of wisdom in this thread came mostly not from me. Thank you all for your input. I'm now taking actos, er met and have split my insulin into two doses. I figure it will take a few weeks to see whether this change anything for the better.

 

Also, the Dr cut the hydrochlorothiazide from my list and doubled up on my lisinopril.

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