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dowling gram

New potatoes vs old potatoes

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dowling gram

I don't usually like potatoes that much so it's no hardship to do without. I do however love new potatoes right from the garden a short time after they flower. Well this is the time and I've been resisting but not tonight. An hour after my husband dug them I tucked into 3 small potatoes slathered in butter and sprinkled in salt and pepper and was in heaven.

 

I've been reading about potatoes and apparently new potatoes have less starch and sugar. I don't know about buying them but I figured right from the garden they might be OK. I'll have to get an hour reading the next time because I got busy and forgot to take it. At 2 hours my BG was back to my before reading of 5.0( 90)  

 

Yea--I think I can eat my new potatoes fresh from the garden. I love home grown garden vegetables. They have so much more flavor than those store bought ones. New potatoes right from the garden shortly after they flower have a taste I can't describe. They taste like nothing you've ever tasted before and certainly not like an old potato or even after they grow bigger in the garden.

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adiantum

Thanks DG, I might try growing them for this experiment.

I'm trying to remember what  I was told many years ago about corn cobs being less "starchy " if eaten same day as picked , something like within an hour or two.

Now I'm wondering if you & she have hit onto something .

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moe22

We do red skinned potatoes with  onions  sometimes ;put in a pan ,toss them in olive oil ,salt & rosemary.... bake about an hour covered...oh my!!!!

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dowling gram

Thanks DG, I might try growing them for this experiment.

I'm trying to remember what  I was told many years ago about corn cobs being less "starchy " if eaten same day as picked , something like within an hour or two.

Now I'm wondering if you & she have hit onto something .

It will be a while before our corn is ready. It's just heading out now but I think I will try it out too. I know from experience that it's sugars start to turn to starch within a day of being picked. That's why supermarket corn has no flavor. Maybe the fiber in corn reacts differently before the sugar turns to starch. We never eat corn unless it's picked and cooked immediately. It's the same when we pick it to freeze it so maybe our frozen corn is good too. I'll have to do some experiments with corn this year. I'll let you know what happens

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jwags

I think there is something to the less starch theory. I can handle new potatoes even ones not fresh from the garden, in a small quantity.

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GrammaBear

I came across a 2 lb bag of those 'mini' potatoes in the store and bought some.  Since our potatoes are not yet ready for digging, my hubby, who isn't diabetic, just HAD to have potatoes for eating.  The smell of the little potatoes tempted me too much so I had a few.........yum, yum.  They were really tiny but tasted oh so good smeared with butter and salt and pepper.  Sigh.......would have liked more though B)

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adiantum

I was watching 2 chefs cooking on tv this morning & one said peas start becoming starchy just 20mins after being picked .

Maybe we could eat peas with confidence as long as we get them to the table quickly.

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Orlando

I was watching 2 chefs cooking on tv this morning & one said peas start becoming starchy just 20mins after being picked .

Maybe we could eat peas with confidence as long as we get them to the table quickly.

 

If you didnt get to the table on time , then you could take a leek.

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adiantum

ooooooooooooooooooooooooh :banghead:

 

That should've come with a " Groan Alert"

LMAO @ Orlando

If you didnt get to the table on time , then you could take a leek.

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ronmesnard

Yes, 'waxy' potatoes have a considerably lower GI than 'fluffy' potatoes such as russet.  Russet potatoes have the same GI as table sugar.  As with any high carb food portion size is everything.  

 

New potatoes are baby potatoes.

 

The newer or smaller the potato the more of the calories are not quickly digested. Larger red potatoes have a fairly high GI. Adding lots of butter and sour cream also slows the digestion of the carbs.  

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Seagal

I don't know how you could get fresh peas from harvest to table in 20 minutes!  First you have to pick enough to make it worthwhile, then you clean & process the peas (shell), then cook for a smidge, butter & eat and hopefully the rest of the meal is ready.  Or you could just eat peas for the meal.  Either way it sounds devine and mixing them with new potatoes is the way we used to fix them :D

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ronmesnard

I few links for potato information.  Potatoes are very 'dicey'.  'Waxy' potatoes are more stable and safer to eat.  Yukon Gold are a waxy potato and all new potatoes are more 'waxy' than the mature ones.  The important point is not all potatoes are the same.  Many GI tables average the different potatoes into a worthless average GI number.  I say worthless because the best potatoes can be 50% lower than the highest.  Of course portion size and BG testing are important.  You may also discover your own insulin resistance also effects what you can tolerate.  From my own experience, I could eat more moderate to high moderate foods without spiking my sugar a year ago than now.  I was getting my BG under control after an upward drift then and had some reserve.   

 

Retrograding works more for the 'bad' potatoes.  The waxy potatoes store their calories in complex sugars and resistant starch which we digest far more slowly than the starchy potatoes.  These sugars do not retrograde while the starch can.  I waxy potatoes are more stable and their GI more predictable.  Retrograding is reversible with temperature.  I have given up potatoes until they don't spike my BG anymore.  They are an 'iffy' food we need to take care when eating.  Many of us need to avoid these foods all together.  

 

http://livewell.jillianmichaels.com/glycemic-index-potatoes-4887.html

 

http://lowcarbdiets.about.com/od/questionsandanswers/a/potatoglycemic.htm

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15800557

 

While I am at it here is some info on resistant starch.

 

Retrograding starch -

Note retrograded starch is the least stable of the resistant starches.  Diabetics ought to be familiar with resistant starch.  It accounts for lowering of the GI for some starchy food.  It slows the digestion of the easily digestible starch (amylose) like fiber except resistant starch is broken down in the large intestine by microbes.  The result is not sugar but small chained fatty acids.  These have health benefits.  2 foods high in amylopectin (resistant starch) that I know of are basmati rice grown in the Punjab and Barilla white fiber pasta.  All basmati rice is high in resistant starch but the rice grown in warmer regions is moderately high GI while that in the Punjab is moderate.  The difference is visible.  Rice grown in the Punjab is 'fluffy' due to the higher concentration of resistant rice.  This is prized in India and is priced at a premium.  That is convenient for those interested in resistant starch.  You can be sure if the rice does not state where it is grown it was not grown in the Punjab.Trader Joes now sells brown basmati rice grown in the Punjab.  The added dark fiber slows the digestion even more.  

 

I am disappointed with Barilla.  They used to sell white fiber pasta with 40% resistant starch now it only contains 20%.  If you wish to experiment with this, buy the shape of pasta that has the highest recommended cook time you can find.  We need to use the minimum cooking time allotted.  The firmer the pasta the slower it digests.  Thicker pasta takes longer to cook and longer to digest. Fettuccine has the same GI as beans 30-40 however beans do not convert to pure sugar.  Normal fettuccine has a moderately low GI especially Italian pastas.  Like the Indians with their rice, Italians prefer eating lower GI pasta because of its consistency.  Even their normal pasta has higher levels of retrograded starch making it chewier.  Barilla has patented drying processes making it the most chewy pasta on the planet.  A word of caution.  Pasta without fiber is pure starch!  Even fettuccine gets converted to 100% sugar eventually.  Small portions are wise and I have stopped eating normal fettuccine as I have potatoes until I lower my insulin resistance.  Smaller sized white fiber and whole wheat pasta have less ill effect for me.  I can't find fettuccine with any kind of fiber even on the internet or I would be eating that.  That would probably be completely safe for me to eat.    

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Retrogradation_(starch)

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