Jump to content
Diabetes forums
  • Welcome To Diabetes Forums!

    Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today to contribute and support the site.

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

predb4

GI INDEX USEFULNESS

Recommended Posts

predb4
On another thread, DOWLING GRAM SAID:
 
 

GI index is also for the most part meaningless IMO.  It gives you some idea but mostly for people who don't test at all. And why to use somebody else's response and in the case of the GI index - HEALTHY people reaction to foods when you can test your own?  

 

 

====================================================

 

I actually bought 2 G.I. BOOKS.  They are useless now that i have learned that the GI index is calculated on healthy individuals.

 

Furthermore, depending on their beta cell fuNction, each diabetic has his own GI.

 

I consider this a throwback to the times when people did not take the blood sugar daily.

 

In fact, as i write, diabetics are systematically denied sufficient strips which would enable them to find their own GI. 

 

In other words, we have to fund the extra strips and meter ourselves, as if we did not already have sufficient expenses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kooka

"In fact, as i write, diabetics are systematically denied sufficient strips which would enable them to find their own GI. 

 

 

In other words, we have to fund the extra strips and meter ourselves, as if we did not already have sufficient expenses."

 

And this is the thing that irks me so bad. I believe there is more money in diabetic medications and supplies  and the big companies want to continue this way. :(

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jwags

I remembering buying the GI book 8 years ago. It was so confusing. Most of the brands they listed were Australian brands and every brand of a product had a different GI. Yes, the original studies were done with healthy people not diabetics. So the research means nothing for us. Having enough strips to test is the issue. I am on Medicare now and they only let me have one strip per day. I am trying to get my Endo to appeal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dowling gram

Actually the GI index is relatively new so it is not a throwback but is meaningless to a diabetic. The truth of the matter is that no book can tell you how and what you should eat. Don't feel bad about wasting money on a useless book. I suppose many of us have gone that route. I know I spent money on a so called diabetic cook book that sits in my cupboard and is never opened.

 

Doctors, diabetic associations and insurance companies who limit strips are living in the dark ages but then much of the medical community is when it comes to diabetes. I feel fortunate to be living with diabetes now when we do have strips and meters even if some of us have to pay for those strips. 50 years ago the only way you could test your sugar was with urine strips that you compared to a color chart. Very inaccurate.

 

My dream is that the medical community will finally wake up. Just think of the pain and suffering that could be avoided if every diabetic knew what we know and strips were free.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fraser

Totally agree on the need for strips, it is the only way we really know what is going on with us.

 

Although I have found the GI useful especially whe talking with newbies, it it least gives some

Sense of what can be worse than others, but always follow up with the only true way to find out how you react to a food is to test.

 

As to testing food on diabetics, I am always amazed how differently we react to or tolerate foods. Really the last place I want info from testing another diabetec. I will just use myself as the ginea pig..

Thank you. ; )

 

I listen and learn from others, but it is not useful to me until I have done my own testing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OldTech

The GI diet was the first one that I tried after my diagnosis. It simply did not control my elevated glucose and I now consider it a dangerous diversion from carb plus protein counting. On the other hand, the Atkins induction diet worked like a charm.

 

We hear similar arguments for choosing foods based on micronutrients rather than macronutrients all the time. I simply don't care how good the micronutrients of a food are if it contains more than a few carbs I will not consume it. 

 

I am also very tired of seeing people list micronutrients of foods that are supposed to prevent diabetes. I ate a lot of those before I was diagnosed trying to stay healthy and I still got diabetes. We need to realize that is just the long-term consumption of excess carbs that is the first order effect on people's long term health as they age. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
oblivious

I don`t agree with this at all.

The various GI tables I have found and put together my self has helped me greatly in the past.

I started out with ranking all the foods I ate after theyr GI, and taking in to concideration how much carbs is in the food per 100 gr, it was easy to find more apropriate foods to eat.

 

GI and GL (glycemic load) are mere guidelines and not a law that you can follow just as is.

Take melons for example. A water melon is relatively high in GI, but is has few carbs per 100 gr so the GL is relatively low.
And if you take in to concideration how you react to all of this, you can create a system for eating that works very well.

 

For example, I react much better to Emmer/Farro flour then regular Wheat flour. Both are pretty much the same in the ammounts of carbs per 100 gr, but the GI of Emmer is a lot lower.

And all my testing has found this to be true for me. So it can work, if done correctly. I`m not saying this is the case for everyone, but it does actually work for some. So not complete bull IMO.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.